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MemberGraham Jensen

I am a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow in English at the University of Victoria in British Columbia, Canada. My research interests include literary modernism, twentieth-century Canadian literature, poetry and poetics, and digital humanities research and methodologies. I am also principal investigator of the Canadian Modernist Magazines Project and a former graduate fellow with Editing Modernism in Canada. At the University of Victoria, I also hold an Associate Fellowship in the Centre for Studies in Religion and Society as well as a Digital Scholarship Fellowship in the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab.

MemberKate Thornhill

I’m a technology librarian who specializes in digital research and teaching methodologies connected to finding, evaluating, curating, archiving, and reusing data to tell, teach, and make scholarly research stories in the humanities and social sciences. I also support operations management for UO Libraries Digital Research, Education, and Media Lab and serve as the Oregon Digital service manager.

MemberOrchid Tierney

A doctoral candidate in the English Department at the University of Pennsylvania, Orchid Tierney researches landfills and their relationships to contemporary poetry, poetics, and media. Her dissertation draws on interdisciplinary methodologies from discard studies, media archaeology, and the digital humanities to explore the issues related to contemporary waste displacement and the afterlives of toxic discards in media art and poetry.

MemberJennifer Guiliano

Dr. Jennifer Guiliano received a Bachelors of Arts in English and History from Miami University (2000), a Masters of Arts in History from Miami University (2002), and a Masters of Arts (2004) in American History from the University of Illinois before completing her Ph.D. in History at the University of Illinois (2010). She currently holds a position as Assistant Professor in the Department of History and affiliated faculty in Native American Studies at the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. She has served as a Post-Doctoral Research Assistant and Program Manager at the Institute for Computing in Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (2008-2010) and as Associate Director of the Center for Digital Humanities (2010-2011) and Research Assistant Professor in the Department of History at the University of South Carolina. She most recently held a position as Assistant Director at the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities at the University of Maryland where she also served as an adjunct instructor in the Department of History and the Digital Cultures program in the Honor’s College. Dr. Guiliano currently serves as President (2016-2018) of the Association for Computing in the Humanities (ACH). She is  co-director with Trevor Muñoz of the Humanities Intensive Teaching + Learning Initiative (HILT) and as co-author with Simon Appleford of DevDH.org, a resource for digital humanities project development. An award-winning teacher and scholar, Dr. Guiliano recently published her monograph Indian Spectacle: College Mascots and the Anxiety of Modern America, which traces the appropriation, production, dissemination, and legalization of Native American images as sports mascots in the late 19th and 20th centuries. She is also completing her co-authored work Getting Started in the Digital Humanities (Wiley & Sons, forthcoming).

MemberDouglas Eyman

Douglas Eyman is Director of the PhD in Writing and Rhetoric, the MA concentration in Professional Writing and Rhetoric (PWR), and the undergraduate Professional Writing Minor at George Mason University.  He teaches courses in digital rhetoric, technical and scientific communication, editing, web authoring, advanced composition, and professional writing. His current research interests include investigations of digital literacy acquisition and development, new media scholarship, electronic publication, information design/information architecture, teaching in digital environments, and video games as sites of composition. Eyman is the senior editor and publisher of Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy, an online journal that has been publishing peer-reviewed scholarship on computers and writing since 1996. His most recent publications include Digital Rhetoric: Theory, Method, Practice (University of Michigan Press, 2015) and Play/Write: Games, Writing, Digital Rhetoric (co-edited with Andrea Davis, Parlor Press, 2016). His scholarly work has appeared in Pedagogy, Computers and Composition, Technical Communication, Cultural Practices of Literacy (Erlbaum, 2007), Digital Writing Research(Hampton Press, 2007), Rhetorically Rethinking Usability (Hampton Press, 2008), Rhetoric and the Digital Humanities (Chicago, 2015), and Microhistories of Composition (Utah State, 2015).  

MemberDarrell J. Rohl

I am a specialist in life and interaction at the edges of the Roman Empire, comparative borderland dynamics in world history, archaeological theory (e.g. archaeology of place, process philosophy, postcolonial perspectives), and digital tools/methodologies within archaeology, history, and the wider humanities. I currently direct the Archaeology program at Calvin College and have active archaeological fieldwork projects in Jordan, where I am the Director of Excavations for the Umm al-Jimal Project and Director of the Hisban North Church Project. Previously, I was the academic lead for the Hidden Landscape of a Roman Frontier Project, a collaborative project of Canterbury Christ Church University and Historic Environment Scotland that focused on remote sensing of the Antonine Wall.

MemberAli Rachel Pearl

Ali Rachel Pearl is a PhD candidate in the Department of English (with a certificate in the Media Arts + Practice program) at the University of Southern California. She is a writer, scholar, and teacher whose work lives at the intersections of race, gender, and digital culture. Her scholarship, prose, book reviews, photos, digital experiments, and other works appear in Hyperrhiz, Hobart, Redivider, DIAGRAM, The New York Timesand elsewhere. Most of the year, she lives and teaches in Los Angeles. Ali writes about archives, surveillance, ephemerality, street art, performance art, and electronic literature. She is concerned with the ways in which traditional memory institutions perpetuate racism, sexism, and exclusion, and explores alternative archives and methodological approaches to documenting art, particularly ephemeral art that resists the archival impulse. She is also working on a project about how ideologies structure digital technology and how communities, bodies/identities, protests, and physical spaces are replicated online.  Ali’s other work is interested in themes of queerness, love, capitalism, family, re-writing history, and the deserts of the American Southwest. She can’t seem to figure out a way to differentiate between her academic bio and her creative writing/artist bio but she doesn’t believe in those kinds of distinctions anyway.

MemberDesiree Rowe

Dr. Desireé D. Rowe received her interdisciplinary Ph.D. in 2009 from the Hugh Downs School of Human Communication at Arizona State University. She also earned her M.A. from Minnesota State, Mankato and B.A. in English from Seton Hall University. Her work lives at the intersections of queer performance ethnography, feminist rhetorical perspectives on popular culture, and digital discourses. Her research agenda currently focuses on radical negativity and failure (among other darker aspects of human subjectivity) to reimagine alternative constructions of possibility. Her work includes articles in Women and Language, Text and Performance Quarterly, Cultural Studies -Critical Methodologies, Rethinking History: A Journal of Theory and Practice, Qualitative Inquiry, many book chapters, and a solo autoethnographic performance that she is touring. She was recently awarded the Best Book Chapter of 2015 by the National Communication Association’s Ethnography Division. In her spare time, she likes to watch crappy reality television and period dramas and build cardboard rocket ships with her daughter.

MemberStephanie J. Lahey

Stephanie J. Lahey is a SSHRC-funded PhD candidate at the University of Victoria, Canada, where she holds the Howard E. Petch Research Scholarship and a University of Victoria Fellowship. Her doctoral dissertation—a mixed-methodology, corpus-based study of the use of parchment ‘offcuts’ (low-quality byproducts of parchment manufacturing) in manuscripts produced in later medieval England—is jointly supervised by Dr. Iain Macleod Higgins (Victoria) and Dr. Erik Kwakkel (UBC iSchool). A recent Guest Researcher at Universiteit Leiden, she is the Editorial Assistant of Early Middle English, teaches at DHSI and at the University of Victoria, and serves on the Public Relations and Outreach Committee of the Canadian Society of Medievalists / Société canadienne des médiévistes. Her research interests include medieval codicology, palaeography, and manuscript production; parchment-manufacturing and use; medieval legal, technical, and reference literatures; quantitative and digital humanities; and public humanities.

MemberMatthew Davis

Matthew Evan Davis is currently an instructor at Blinn College. Prior to this, he served as a Postdoctoral Fellow with the Lewis and Ruth Sherman Centre for Digital Scholarship at McMaster University, a Lindsey Young Visiting Faculty Fellow at the University of Tennessee’s Marco Institute, and as the Council for Library and Information Resources/Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Data Curation for Medieval Studies at North Carolina State University. While at North Carolina State he worked as part of the team on two similar projects — the Piers Plowman Electronic Archive and the Siege of Jerusalem Electronic Archive, as well the Manuscript DNA project and the Medieval Electronic Scholarly Alliance, an aggregator and discussion space for digital scholarly and cultural heritage work regarding the Middle Ages. Davis works on the staging practices of medieval drama, cultural transmission through translation and reception, the history of the book, and material and digital curation as a means of preserving both the material object and the connections between the object, the content contained by that object, and its cultural milieu. His current digital project is the Minor Works of John Lydgate virtual archive, which is attempting to make the manuscripts and other media containing the works of Lydgate that exist in less than twenty witnesses more accessible to scholars of the poet, students who may have only read them in print editions, and individuals interested in manuscripts as artifacts in their own right. It also serves to bridge a gap between the digital world, where anything that cannot be concretely categorized is often left by the wayside, and the physical object with its own rich set of significations. His CV may be seen both on this site and here, and he may be contacted via email at matthew@matthewedavis.net