Search

MemberGraham Jensen

I am a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow in English at the University of Victoria in British Columbia, Canada. My research interests include literary modernism, twentieth-century Canadian literature, poetry and poetics, and digital humanities research and methodologies. I am also principal investigator of the Canadian Modernist Magazines Project and a former graduate fellow with Editing Modernism in Canada. At the University of Victoria, I also hold an Associate Fellowship in the Centre for Studies in Religion and Society as well as a Digital Scholarship Fellowship in the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab.

MemberKate Thornhill

I’m a technology librarian who specializes in digital research and teaching methodologies connected to finding, evaluating, curating, archiving, and reusing data to tell, teach, and make scholarly research stories in the humanities and social sciences. I also support operations management for UO Libraries Digital Research, Education, and Media Lab and serve as the Oregon Digital service manager.

MemberOrchid Tierney

A doctoral candidate in the English Department at the University of Pennsylvania, Orchid Tierney researches landfills and their relationships to contemporary poetry, poetics, and media. Her dissertation draws on interdisciplinary methodologies from discard studies, media archaeology, and the digital humanities to explore the issues related to contemporary waste displacement and the afterlives of toxic discards in media art and poetry.

MemberJennifer Guiliano

Dr. Jennifer Guiliano received a Bachelors of Arts in English and History from Miami University (2000), a Masters of Arts in History from Miami University (2002), and a Masters of Arts (2004) in American History from the University of Illinois before completing her Ph.D. in History at the University of Illinois (2010). She currently holds a position as Assistant Professor in the Department of History and affiliated faculty in Native American Studies at the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. She has served as a Post-Doctoral Research Assistant and Program Manager at the Institute for Computing in Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (2008-2010) and as Associate Director of the Center for Digital Humanities (2010-2011) and Research Assistant Professor in the Department of History at the University of South Carolina. She most recently held a position as Assistant Director at the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities at the University of Maryland where she also served as an adjunct instructor in the Department of History and the Digital Cultures program in the Honor’s College. Dr. Guiliano currently serves as President (2016-2018) of the Association for Computing in the Humanities (ACH). She is  co-director with Trevor Muñoz of the Humanities Intensive Teaching + Learning Initiative (HILT) and as co-author with Simon Appleford of DevDH.org, a resource for digital humanities project development. An award-winning teacher and scholar, Dr. Guiliano recently published her monograph Indian Spectacle: College Mascots and the Anxiety of Modern America, which traces the appropriation, production, dissemination, and legalization of Native American images as sports mascots in the late 19th and 20th centuries. She is also completing her co-authored work Getting Started in the Digital Humanities (Wiley & Sons, forthcoming).

MemberNicole Rizzuto

Statement of Interest as Candidate for MLA’s Executive Committee LLC 20th and 21st Century English and Anglophone Literatures My interest in serving on the Executive Committee for Twentieth and Twenty-First Century English and Anglophone Literatures stems from my ongoing research within these fields and from my commitment to addressing the changing structure of the profession and its effects on knowledge production and scholarly activity. I take the current ideological and financial pressures placed on the humanities and literary studies occurring in the context of ecological and employment crises as challenges to be met on a number of fronts. I will work toward fomenting an inclusive atmosphere in the organization of sessions, panels, and other scholarly activities to encourage dialogue among all ranks of teacher-scholars across racial, gender, ethnic, sexual, and class identifications. I am interested in supporting a range of scholarship that foregrounds methodological debates about interpretative practices and ways of reading colonial, postcolonial, and neocolonial modernities; scholarship that reflects on the protocols of disciplinary and cross-disciplinary formations in era of an increasingly globalized and digitalized literary studies; and scholarship that considers how these debates, practices, and protocols are shaped by precarities emergent with the contraction of employment opportunities and resources for those working in the fields of twentieth and twenty-first century literatures. I will work to encourage the participation of graduate students, Early Career Researchers, and independent scholars in reimagining the intellectual landscape of the field and its professional practices. Finally, given the unevenly experienced effects of the climate crisis, I will support environmental humanities work that foregrounds marginalized perspectives while reconfiguring the boundaries of humanistic thought through engagement with social sciences, natural sciences, and science and technology research.

MemberMaria Papadopoulou

I was trained as a classical philologist and a linguist. I wrote my PhD on the ‘Semantics of Colour Terms in Hellenistic Poetry’ (University of Athens, Greece 2011). My research is interdisciplinary and draws on a wide range of sources and methodologies. I have published over 30 academic papers in well-acclaimed international volumes and have managed several research projects in Greek Dialectology at the Academy of Athens, Greece and at the Greek Ministry of Education, where I was tenured 2001, after succeeding in rigorous nation-wide examinations. In 2014 I earned a two-year Marie Curie Fellowship entitled ‘Chlamys. The cultural biography of a garment in Hellenistic Egypt’ (Grant agreement no. 657898). This prestigious grant resulted in a two-year fellowship at the University of Copenhagen (May 2015 – April 2017) Project website: http://ctr.hum.ku.dk/marie-sklodowska-curie-projects/previous-marie-sklodowska-curie-projects/chlamys/ Since January 2017 I have been a member of Equipe Condillac-Listic at the University of Savoie Mont Blanc, an international research group interested in different aspects of ontology and multilingual terminology (http://new.condillac.org/members/). As a member of this team in charge of initiatives linked to Digital Humanities, my research activities aim at promoting the interdisciplinary dialogue between different research communities, namely those working in Artificial Intelligence, Knowledge Representation, Semantic Web technologies and Ontology, with Humanists, especially those working in Classics broadly defined, i.e., covering all possible expressions of the cultures and cultural heritage of Ancient Greece and Rome, both tangible and intangible: movable and immovable objects, texts, and practices.

MemberDouglas Eyman

Douglas Eyman is Director of the PhD in Writing and Rhetoric, the MA concentration in Professional Writing and Rhetoric (PWR), and the undergraduate Professional Writing Minor at George Mason University.  He teaches courses in digital rhetoric, technical and scientific communication, editing, web authoring, advanced composition, and professional writing. His current research interests include investigations of digital literacy acquisition and development, new media scholarship, electronic publication, information design/information architecture, teaching in digital environments, and video games as sites of composition. Eyman is the senior editor and publisher of Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy, an online journal that has been publishing peer-reviewed scholarship on computers and writing since 1996. His most recent publications include Digital Rhetoric: Theory, Method, Practice (University of Michigan Press, 2015) and Play/Write: Games, Writing, Digital Rhetoric (co-edited with Andrea Davis, Parlor Press, 2016). His scholarly work has appeared in Pedagogy, Computers and Composition, Technical Communication, Cultural Practices of Literacy (Erlbaum, 2007), Digital Writing Research(Hampton Press, 2007), Rhetorically Rethinking Usability (Hampton Press, 2008), Rhetoric and the Digital Humanities (Chicago, 2015), and Microhistories of Composition (Utah State, 2015).  

MemberDarrell J. Rohl

I am a specialist in life and interaction at the edges of the Roman Empire, comparative borderland dynamics in world history, archaeological theory (e.g. archaeology of place, process philosophy, postcolonial perspectives), and digital tools/methodologies within archaeology, history, and the wider humanities. I currently direct the Archaeology program at Calvin College and have active archaeological fieldwork projects in Jordan, where I am the Director of Excavations for the Umm al-Jimal Project and Director of the Hisban North Church Project. Previously, I was the academic lead for the Hidden Landscape of a Roman Frontier Project, a collaborative project of Canterbury Christ Church University and Historic Environment Scotland that focused on remote sensing of the Antonine Wall.

MemberAlberto Campagnolo

Alberto Campagnolo trained as a book conservator (in Spoleto, Italy) and has worked in that capacity in various institutions, e.g. London Metropolitan Archives, St. Catherine’s Monastery (Egypt), and the Vatican Library. He studied Conservation of Library Materials at Ca’ Foscari University Venice, and holds an MA in Digital Culture and Technology from King’s College London. He pursued a PhD on an automated visualization of historical bookbinding structures at the Ligatus Research Centre (University of the Arts, London). He was a CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow (2016-2018) in Data Curation for Medieval Studies at the Library of Congress (Washington, DC). Alberto, in collaboration with Dot Porter (SIMS, UPenn Libraries, Philadelphia, PA), has been involved from the onset in the development of VisColl, a model and tool for the recording and visualization of the gathering structure of books in codex format. Alberto has served on the Digital Medievalist board since 2014, first as Deputy Director, and as Director since 2015, and has been in the Editorial Board of the Journal of Paper Conservation since 2016.

MemberDesiree Rowe

Dr. Desireé D. Rowe received her interdisciplinary Ph.D. in 2009 from the Hugh Downs School of Human Communication at Arizona State University. She also earned her M.A. from Minnesota State, Mankato and B.A. in English from Seton Hall University. Her work lives at the intersections of queer performance ethnography, feminist rhetorical perspectives on popular culture, and digital discourses. Her research agenda currently focuses on radical negativity and failure (among other darker aspects of human subjectivity) to reimagine alternative constructions of possibility. Her work includes articles in Women and Language, Text and Performance Quarterly, Cultural Studies -Critical Methodologies, Rethinking History: A Journal of Theory and Practice, Qualitative Inquiry, many book chapters, and a solo autoethnographic performance that she is touring. She was recently awarded the Best Book Chapter of 2015 by the National Communication Association’s Ethnography Division. In her spare time, she likes to watch crappy reality television and period dramas and build cardboard rocket ships with her daughter.