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MemberOlivia Richmond

I’m in my fourth year in History at Carleton. I moved to Ottawa three years ago from Kitchener, ON. This year, I am developing digital history skills by working with my classmates on digitizing Late Medieval folio pages and learning the mystic arts involved in digital codicology. My usual interests include medieval women, medieval Christianity and monasticism , disability studies, and sexuality and gender. This year I am working on an Honours research project, which will be a year long endeavour into late medieval convents, considering what images they were exposed to and how the cloister impacted the lives of the nuns living there.

MemberLincoln Mullen

I am a historian of American religious history and nineteenth-century United States history, often working with computational and spatial methods. I am an assistant professor in the Department of History and Art History at George Mason University, where I teach digital history, American religious history, and the nineteenth-century United States. I am also affiliated faculty at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media.

MemberEric Nystrom

I am interested in the history of technology, particularly those histories at the intersection of visual culture and work. In Seeing Underground: Maps, Models, and Mining Engineering in America (2014), I examined the development and use of visual tools such as underground maps, photographs, and 3-D models by American mining engineers in the late 19th and early 20th century. These visual tools helped mining engineers exercise their authority over work, and together with new technologies, enabled them to shape and reshape mining labor and the mining landscape. I am also keenly interested in public history (especially the histories of institutions such as parks and museums), and digital history (particularly text mining, distant reading, and population microdata). Prior to joining Arizona State, I was assistant and associate professor of history at the Rochester Institute of Technology in Rochester, New York (2007-2015).

MemberSheila A Brennan

…http://networkedcurator.doingdh.org
Mapping Early American Elections, Co-Primary Investigator and Co-Director, 2016-19: Grant to develop new access points to a rich collection of early American election returns by building maps and interpretive essays, http://earlyamericanelections.org/
Doing Digital History 2014 & 2016: An Institute for Mid-Career American Historians
Co-Primary Investigator and Co-Director, 2013-17: Grants to design, teach, and evaluate a summer Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities for training mid-career historians in digital humanities work, ht…
…George Mason University, PhD, History (Major field US History; Minor fields: memory and museums; digital history)

University of Notre Dame, MA, American Studies

Bates College, BA, American Cultural Studies, (Minor in Spanish)…
…ital Age,” Oxford Handbook of Oral History, (New York: Oxford University Press, 2010) with James Halabuk, Sharon Leon, Tom Scheinfeldt, and Kelly Schrum.
Encyclopedia of New England Culture (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2005), 3 entries

Research White Papers and Reports

“Doing Digital History 2016: A Summer Institute for Mid-Career American Historians, white paper, co-author Sharon Leon, Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, June 2017: http://history2016.doingdh.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/8/2017/07/DoingDH2016-Whitepaper-Full.pdf
“Building Histories of t…

I am a digital public historian and a program officer. I am the former Director of Strategic Initiatives at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media where I also worked as a Research Associate Professor in History and Art History at George Mason University. My newest publication, Stamping American Memory: Collectors, Citizens, and the Post, is available as an open access digital and print monograph from the University of Michigan’s Digital Culture Books series. It offers the first cultural history of stamp collecting through closely examining the Post Office’s commemorative stamp program. Designed to be saved as souvenirs, commemoratives circulated widely and stood as miniature memorials to carefully selected snapshots from the American past that also served the political needs of small interest groups. I began my career working in public museums, and served as the Director of Education and Public Programs at the U.S. Navy Museum in Washington, DC for seven years before I came to RRCHNM in 2005. At the Center, I directed and managed 30+ projects. The first project that I managed and worked on from start to finish was the Hurricane Digital Memory Bank. After HDMB, I became part of the original Omeka team (2007-present), and continued to work on many other digital humanities and cultural heritage projects. I have experience teaching, and leading and developing workshops that introduce digital humanities methods to scholars, GLAM professionals, and graduate students. I received my PhD in American and digital history from Mason, and earned an MA from the University of Notre Dame and BA from Bates College in American Studies. My research interests include public history, digital history, collecting practices, how museums use the web and digital platforms, museums and material culture, memory and memorialization, and US cultural history. I have co-authored essays on teaching the history of technology, doing oral history in the digital age, as well as white papers focused on developing digital public history projects and on increasing digital literacies of mid-career scholars. I have contributed to edited collections, including Debates in Digital Humanities 2016 and two volumes published by Smithsonian Institution Press. My dissertation, “Stamping American Memory: Stamp Collecting in the U.S. 1880s-1930s,” earned the 2010 Moroney Prize for Scholarship in Postal History. In 2012, I was awarded the University of Michigan Press-HASTAC Prize for Digital Humanities to create a new web project, Stamping American Memory, an open peer-reviewed, open access digital book and publication with University of Michigan Press. I present on topics in digital humanities and museums, online collecting, postal history, and digital public history.

MemberTrina Etmanskie

Aspiring teacher, current student. I am working towards finishing my undergraduate degree with hopes in starting a Bachelor of Education in September 2019. I am interested in learning new skills and techniques that I could apply to a classroom setting. My goal is to become an elementary school teacher in Ontario. My hope is that I can apply new, technological ways of research into the classroom even for those at a young age. My academic interests are public history, understanding digital history as a tool for storytelling and introducing technology into the history classroom. My goal is to gain a knowledge base that will allow me to further my interest in education reform as well as utilize tools of digital history to inform and teach new, young learners. History is not of the past but of the present! With the correct tools, the young minds of tomorrow can truly grasp and understand the past in new lights. My main area of study in my academics lays in the sphere of public history. It is interesting to begin to understand how we have displayed history in the public eyes. Although we can all view history (as it happens around us every moment) there are few moments that are preserved. Why do we choose these moments? And how do we preserve them? Further more, what does the way in which we preserve these moments say about us as a society? —————————— I have knowledge using: Twine Github Languages such as Markdown and basic Javascript —————————— “There is no end to education. It is not that you read a book, pass an examination, and finish with education. The whole of life, from the moment you are born to the moment you die, is a process of learning.” – Jiddu Krishnamurti  —————————— Follow me along this academic journey as I work towards the task of discovering what medieval folio I have stumbled upon! I will be posting on Twitter and my blog with up to date information along this digital journey.

MemberVeronica Berry

I moved to Ottawa from Aylmer, Ontario four years ago to pursue a History B.A. Honours at Carleton University. My areas of interest are quite wide-ranging as my previous courses include discussions on the fall of the Western Roman Empire, the Vikings’ arrival in Britain, France after 1871 and a thorough history of Russia. I prefer to engage with various areas, periods and approaches to history because this helps to broaden my view on the world. I found it fascinating to take two courses on late nineteenth/early twentieth century Ireland at the same time as I learned about similar events from a male-centred narrative alongside a neglected, less traditional female viewpoint. I centred my fourth year on two seminars entitled American Madness and Digitizing Medieval Manuscripts. Though these classes sound incredibly different from each other their relationship to the present (along with my interest) links them together. Given mental illness’ awareness in our society I want to investigate exactly how people treated and understood mental illness in the past. The course’s specific focus in America feels suitable, as U.S. history—from the Civil War to the Civil Rights Movement—has been a reoccurring subject throughout my undergraduate degree. Digitizing Medieval Manuscripts stood out due to the rising growth in digital history and my own personal aspirations for a graduate degree in Library Sciences. Through this course I hope to explore a new technological world and develop important skills to carry on after graduation. Additionally, my interest in the medieval significantly increased during my year in the United Kingdom where I investigated popular accounts of ‘ghost stories’ and religious vs. societal ideas around sanctity. Finally, as an avid reader I love uncovering the ‘story’ within historical documents, events and people. I hope to one-day work in an environment (whether that is a library, a museum or an archive) in which I can surround myself daily with documents and artefacts that make history come alive.

MemberCatherine Gibson

I am a researcher at the European University Institute specialising in the history of science in the Russian Empire in the long nineteenth century. I am particularly interested in how local populations understood and participated in the production of cartographical knowledge about the empire and its peoples. Co-editor of the scholarly blog Peripheral Histories? A collaborative digital history of the Russian, Soviet, and post-Soviet provinces, localities, and republics. https://peripheralhistories.wixsite.com/ NEW PUBLICATION: ‘Shading, Lines, Colours: Mapping Ethnographic Taxonomies of European Russia, 1851-1875.’ Nationalities Papers (2018): 1-20. https://doi.org/10.1080/00905992.2017.1364229