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MemberAttila Mészáros

Dr. Attila Mészáros studied German and Hungaric Studies at the Philosopher Constantine University in Nitra (Slovakia) and subsequently did her PhD in the field of German linguistics at the TU Chemnitz, Germany. In his dissertation he examined the techniques of popularizing knowledge transfer in the computer field in a multilingual context. As Senior Research Assistant at the Department of German Language and Literature of the J. Selye University in Komárno (Slovakia), he is working on his habilitation project, which is dedicated to the refugee debate in the German, Hungarian and Slovak press.

MemberKyle Frackman

I am an Associate Professor of German & Scandinavian Studies in the Department of Central, Eastern, and Northern European Studies at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. My teaching and research interests include 18th- to 20th-century German literature, the history and culture of the German Democratic Republic (East Germany), and German and Nordic film.

MemberMartin Munke

I am a historian interested in East-Central and Eastern European History. My focus lies on the relations and entanglements of these areas with the German lands, especially in the Age of Enlightenment and the ‘Age of Extremes’. Another focus of my work are digital methods and the concepts of Open Science and Citicen Science in the field of historical research. After several years as research assistant at Chemnitz University of Technology (Institute of European History, Institute of European Studies), I work as head of the divison “Saxonica” (since 2016) and vice head of the department “Manuscripts, Rare Prints, and Saxony” (since 2017) at Saxon State and University Library (SLUB), Dresden.

MemberAndrea Wald

I am a graduate student at the department of Germanic Studies. I studied German, English, and Theater, Film, and Media Studies in Vienna and Cambridge. I am currently writing a dissertation on the Austrian writer Hugo von Hofmannsthal and the “Aesthetics of Surface” in literature, philosophy, and psychoanalysis ca. 1900.My interests include: early 20th century German and Austrian literature; Baroque literature and aesthetics; the reception of the Baroque in 20th century scholarship; the intersection of aesthetic and political theory, psychoanalysis.

MemberJulie Shoults

Julie Shoults is currently a Lecturer in German at Muhlenberg College in Allentown, Pennsylvania. She received her PhD in German Studies in 2015 from the University of Connecticut, where she also earned her M.A. in German Studies (2009) and her Graduate Certificate in Women’s Studies (2011). She was an instructor in the Department of Literatures, Cultures, & Languages and in the Women’s, Gender, & Sexuality Studies Program while at UConn. Before attending the University of Connecticut, Julie earned her B.A. in German and English at Moravian College (2005) and spent a year as a Fulbright Teaching Assistant in Berlin, Germany (2005-2006). Her research interests include life writing and autobiographical genres, women and socialism, and German Expressionism, and her dissertation, “Narrating a Tradition: Socialist Women with a Feminist Consciousness in the German Bildungsroman” was awarded the 2016 Dissertation Prize by the Coalition of Women in German. Her current projects focus on the intersections of gender and violence in the contexts of WWI, WWII, and the GDR.

MemberClaus Janew

Our striving for knowledge is a declaration of love. By gaining wisdom we are loved in return. – Claus Janew lives in Dresden and Bonn, Germany, and is an independent philosopher and autodidact who has been alternating between multi-year full-time research and multi-year full-time employment for funding since 1985. He only writes when he has something new to say. Claus Janew discovered the infinitesimality structure, an explanation of both consciousness and reality being a direct solution to the problem of free will. Part of it is an unlimited change of conscious focus in principle. The basics have been published in German and English journals. A comprehensive book about his metaphysics is available in German; furthermore a self-help guide and a challenging dialogue, the latter in English as well.

MemberErvin Malakaj

I am Assistant Professor of German Studies at the University of British Columbia. Prior to my appointment at UBC, I served as Assistant Professor of German and Coordinator of the German Program at Sam Houston State University. I received my Ph.D. in Germanic Languages and Literatures and Film & Media Studies at Washington University in St. Louis (2015) and hold a B.A. (2007) and M.A. (2009) in German Studies from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

I specialize in late-18th to 21st-century German media and cultural history. In particular, my research focuses on 19th-century literary cultures, film history (Imperial Germany, Weimar Germany, cinema of the 60s and 70s), narrative theory, queer theory, and critical pedagogy.

Currently, I am writing a book examining the influence of fluctuating literary markets on authorial agency and narrative form provisionally titled Fragile Literary Cultures in Early Imperial Germany. Part and parcel of this research is my work on a volume titled The Becoming and Afterlife of Literature: Agents in the German Literary Field (co-edited with Vance Byrd).

My scholarship in film studies includes a book project examining the primacy of melodramatic form in the articulation of queer experiences in popular culture and the intellectual sphere of Weimar Germany. In addition, I am completing an article, which examines the queer potential of slapstick in Ernst Lubitsch’s early comedies. This article is part of my work on an edited volume titled An Interdisciplinary Companion to Slapstick Cultures (co-edited with Alena Lyons and under advanced contract with de Gruyter).

In 2016, I co-founded the international scholarly collective “Diversity, Decolonialization, and the German Curriculum” (DDGC). Following DDGC’s inaugural conference March 2017 at the University of North Carolina, Asheville, DDGC has been institutionalized into a biannual conference (the next conference will take place Spring 2019 at St. Olaf College). I also serve as the co-editor of DDGC’s official blog.