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MemberPeter Mondelli

Peter Mondelli has served on the faculty at UNT’s College of Music since 2012.  His main research projects consider the impact of print culture and bourgeois capitalism on nineteenth-century Parisian opera.  Other areas of interest include oral song culture in the late eighteenth-century, early music and musicology in fin-de-siècle France, and the relationship between music studies and the posthumanities.

MemberRyan Patten

A PhD candidate in Editorial Studies at Boston University’s Editorial Institute, where my dissertation is a critical edition of a selection of Maurice Greene’s (1696–1755) orchestral anthems. Other interests include: music and cultural history of the Early Modern Era, especially of Britain and North America; sacred music and theology; Irish and Scottish music; textual criticism; and bibliography.

MemberBarbara J. Eckstein

Sustainability; ecocriticism; global circulations–human and not–especially through the Upper and Lower Mississippi River Basin. Among the circulations that especially interest me are people (e.g. different kinds of laborers), cultures, mosquitoes, diseases, and modes of human interaction alternative to capitalism. Among the writers and thinkers that most engage me now are William Wells Brown, Eddy Harris, and Joseph Nicollet. I am also interested in other rivers–the Narmada, Zambezi, Limpopo, Murray-Darling, Hawkesbury–struggles over technologies to control them, water rites, the ecosystems they support, their use as boundaries, and their appearance in literature.

Membernispero

I am a scholar of U.S. and Latin American literature and culture of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In particular, my first book and my current projects reflect a transnational approach to the cultural history of capitalism. They address a common broad question: how are our local and national identities shaped by and through popular economic and political narratives? My book, A Cultural History of Underdevelopment: Latin America in the U.S. Imagination (University of Virginia Press, 2016) explores how Americans have mapped the hemisphere from the mid-19th century to the end of the Cold War in terms of an economic geography in which the United States was a rich nation among poor ones. The most common term for this geography and condition of poverty has been “underdevelopment,” a term from the social sciences that has also drawn on cultural generalizations about the origins and the spaces of poverty. Since I arrived at Wayne State, I have also taught and writen about the history and culture of Detroit, especially in the ways its image circulates outside the city–as the Motor City, Motown, the Arsenal of Democracy, and the city of ruins. My new project, Keywords for the Age of Austerity, is an evolving online work of historical etymology and cultural criticism. I trace the history of economic concepts in the mass media, uncovering the history and common use of popular terms like “accountability,” “entrepreneur,” and “innovation.”

MemberRichard J. Callahan, Jr.

Material histories of religion, emphasizing the work of people in and on the world, stemming from American history and culture through the networks of resource extraction to oceanic spaces and the dark of coal mines. Comparative studies of religion and globalization embedded in those networks, influencing and influenced by the relentless frames of capitalism and “civilization.”