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MemberMaria Seger

I’m an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. My research and teaching interests include early and nineteenth-century American literature, African American literature, US ethnic literatures, and critical race and ethnic studies. As a literary and cultural studies scholar, I am broadly interested in the violence of racial capitalism in US literature and culture. My work primarily deals with how violence arises out of and impacts capitalist social relations and ideological production, especially as it relates to notions of selfhood, ownership, and state power across the long nineteenth century. Right now, I’m at work on my book project, At All Costs: Extralegal Violence and Liberal Democracy in American Culture, which examines extralegal violence not as a lawless force that threatened American liberal-democratic governance but instead as emerging from and further entrenching the conditions that governance set.

DepositRace

“Race” offers a compelling study of ideas related to race throughout history. Its breadth of coverage, both geographically and temporally, provides readers with an expansive, global understanding of the term from the classical period onwards: Intersections of Race and Gender // Race and Social Theory Identity // Ethnicity, and Immigration // Whiteness // Legislative and Judicial Markings of Difference // Race in South Africa, Israel, East Asia, Asian America // Blackness in a Global Context // Race in the History of Science // Critical Race Theory

MemberJames M. Harland

I work on the history and archaeology of late antique and early medieval Western Europe, specifically Britain and Gaul, with a focus on processes of transformation and ethnic change. My broader interests lie in ethnic identity, transformation and continuity, and military and economic history, in addition to the philosophical and ethical implications of the study of these fields and their reception and misuse in the modern day, drawing upon continental philosophy and literary theory to explore these concerns. My doctoral thesis was a critical historiography of the study of ethnic identity through archaeological means in late and post-Roman Britain, making use of ethnic sociology and continental philosophy to examine and interrogate the epistemological foundations which underpin this subject of study. More information about my research, publications, CV and teaching can be found on my hcommons site, here.

MemberJina Kim

I am currently a Consortium for Faculty Diversity postdoctoral fellow in the program in Critical Social Thought at Mount Holyoke College. In Fall 2018, I will be Assistant Professor of English and SWG (Study of Women and Gender) at Smith College. I received my PhD in English and Women’s Studies from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor in the summer of 2016, and my BA in Studio Art and English from Agnes Scott College in 2007. My research lies at the intersection of critical disability studies, contemporary multi-ethnic US literature, and women of color feminisms. I am at work on a manuscript titled Anatomy of the City: Race, Infrastructure, and US Fictions of Dependency, which examines how multi-ethnic U.S. literatures situated in post-Reagan cities recuperate the maligned condition of public dependency. Drawing together ethnic literary, feminist disability, women of color feminist, and urban sociological studies, it re-conceptualizes the pathologized cityscape disabled by anti-welfare policy, and positions dependency as an underexplored yet vital analytic for ethnic American cultural critique. Attending to infrastructure as thematic, formal, and analytic concern, I argue that writers, artists, and activists like Karen Tei Yamashita, Helena María Viramontes, Toni Cade Bambara, Anna Deavere Smith, and Grace Lee Boggs salvage dependency by highlighting public support systems: healthcare, transportation, education, sanitation, and food welfare. In doing so, they emphasize our contingency on human and material infrastructures alike—the often-obscured pipes, wires, roads, and labor networks that regulate metropolitan life. Through their engagement with infrastructural support, the texts in my study register, contest, or overwrite dominant rhetorics of dependency, which selectively equate racialized and gendered deviance with state parasitism (i.e. the “illegal” migrant, the welfare queen). City infrastructure, in the literary-cultural afterlife of 1996 U.S. welfare reform, operates as a figure of condensation for a counter-discourse of dependency—one that documents the disabling violence of state divestment while foregrounding a public ethics of care. My work has appeared in Disability Studies Quarterly, the anthology Disability Studies and the Environmental Humanities, and Lateral: Journal of the Cultural Studies Association. In 2012, I received the Irving K. Zola Award for Emerging Scholars in Disability Studies.

MemberSarah Tucker Jenkins

Sarah earned her bachelors in Women’s and Gender Studies from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. While in North Carolina, she was also a research assistant for the book, Transforming Scholarship: Why Women’s and Gender Studies Students Are Changing Themselves and the World by Drs. Michele Tracy Berger and Cheryl Radeloff. She earned her masters in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies at Florida Atlantic University. While at FAU, Sarah taught Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies and volunteered with the LGBTQA Resource Center. She also founded the student organization, The F-Word: FAU Feminists. Her master’s thesis is titled “Hegemonic ‘Realness’? An Intersectional Feminist Analysis of RuPaul’s Drag Race.” Sarah also earned an M.Ed. in Critical Studies in Educational Foundations at Ohio University, where she served as the Women’s Center Program Coordinator for three years. She is currently serving as the Young Women Leaders Program Mentoring Coordinator at the University of Virginia.