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MemberDominique Hetu

I recently completed my Ph.D. (FRQSC) in Comparative Literature at the Université de Montréal. My dissertation,” Geographies of Care and Posthuman Relationality in North American Fiction by Women,” explores how seven contemporary North-American novels (historical novels, contemporary fiction and dystopias) written by women illustrate the primacy of relationality. To achieve this goal, I use the notions of “geographies of care” and “posthuman care” critically to uncover, in the texts, gestures, and attitudes of care that facilitate, despite obstacles, the appropriation of social and intimate structures through the development of spaces and relationships of solidarity.I am now a postdoctoral fellow (SSHRC, CLC) at the Canadian Literature Centre (UAlberta), under the supervision of Marie Carrière. My project will further investigate the interconnections between posthuman care, ordinary ethics, and Canadian and Quebecois literatures.My main research interests are feminist care ethics, the posthuman framework, Canadian literature, ordinary ethics, and feminist/alternative space theory.

MemberTana Jean Welch

Tana Jean Welch is a poet and scholar of contemporary American poetry. She received her Ph.D. in Literature from Florida State University in 2013, specializing in medical humanities, American poetry and poetics, multiethnic literature, posthumanism, new materialism, and gender theory. She is currently Assistant Professor at the Florida State University College of Medicine where she teaches courses in literature, writing, and humanities and serves as the managing editor for HEAL: Humanism Evolving through Arts and Literature. Her critical work has been published in MELUSThe Journal of Ecocriticism, and Academic Medicine. Her poetry has been published in The Southern ReviewPrairie SchoonerThe Gettysburg Review, and other national literary journals. Her first collection of poetry, Latest Volcano, was the winner of the 2015 Marsh Hawk Press Poetry Prize.

MemberKate Costello

Kate Costello is a doctoral candidate at the University of Oxford, specializing in modern Chinese literature and culture. Her doctoral thesis examines bilingualism, language games and word play in modern and contemporary experimental literature. Her research focuses on the relationship between bilingualism and linguistic experimentation, investigating the ways that multiple language competencies are deployed within a literary text. Drawing on the work of a broad range of authors that do not fit neatly into Sinophone, Francophone, or Anglophone canons, her thesis resituates these authors within a framework of interlingual writing. Paying special attention to the creative manipulation of sound, script, and syntax, her dissertation examines the playful, devious and irreverent ways that bilingual competencies manifest themselves in experimental writing. Her research interests extend to film, theatre, and text-based visual arts practices. Kate has a strong interest in linguistics and critical theory, and is co-convener of the Oxford Comparative Criticism and Translation Discussion Group. She has presented papers at major international conferences including the American Comparative Literature Association annual meeting, the Modern Language Association annual convention, the Association for Asian Studies Annual Conference, the Association for Chinese Literature and Comparative Literature biannual conference, and the Cognitive Futures in the Humanities annual conference. Kate is also a literary translator and she has translated short stories, poems and essays by Renshun Jin, Su Xian, and Wa Lan. Her translations have appeared in Washington Square ReviewChinese Arts and Letters, the LA Review of Books China Channel, Paper Republic and Quarterly Asia, as well as the 2018 Seoul International Writer’s Festival Anthology.  

MemberAliya Weise

I am a Ph.D. Candidate at the George Washington University with a focus on American Literature, Critical Theory, Posthumanism, and Multispecies Theory. I am also a Preliminary Credential Candidate at the San Diego State University and conducting my student teaching at San Diego High School of International Studies, an International Baccalaureate school. I have completed graduate programs at the George Washington University and the University of Maryland in American Literature and Creative Writing respectively. My undergraduate education in English Language Literature and Creative Writing was at Western Washington University. I began my academic career and life-long love for education at the Green River Community College. My goals are to help students of any age learn how to use textual references to construct meaning from, interpret, and respond to complex text with a written product. In short, I hope to share my love of literacy and nurture such a love in others. I am also eager to contribute to my scholarly field and to our understanding of English Language Arts pedagogy. While working on my studies I have held teaching appointments ranging from the George Washington University to Montgomery Middle School. I have also had a variety of administrative positions and committee appointments. I excel at detail-orientated work, collaborate well with others, am competent with numerous electronic and paper-based education resources, and am highly adept at learning new skills. The experiences I have had in my career, my studies, and my life have allowed me to develop versatile skills to work exceptionally well with diverse populations.