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MemberLuna Najera

Areas of interest: Spanish and Latin American cultural studies (early modern and colonial); gender studies; second language acquisition; community engagement. Her journal articles have focused on early modern war, surveillance, gender, and other themes.  Born in Guatemala, she grew up in Los Angeles. She earned a Ph.D. in the Department of Romance Studies at Cornell University, and a B.A. from Hampshire College. Her faculty appointments have included Vassar College, Trinity College, University College Utrecht, and Radboud University (The Netherlands).

MemberDavid E. García

David García is a professor of English at Carthage College, having dedicated the past twenty-five years to the lives of faculty and students as an academic administrator and faculty member. A romanticist by training, he contributed to two manuscript transcription projects (the Cornell Wordsworth and Cornell Yeats series); current interests include the role of faculty in remaking the academy through curricular and pedagogical innovation and of making a case for the humanities in modern society.

MemberChristine Yao

Christine “Xine” Yao is a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of British Columbia in the Department of English. She works on intersections of affect, race, gender, and sexuality in relation to science and law through long 19th century American literature. Her research has been published in J19: The Journal of Nineteenth-Century Americanists and American Gothic: An Edinburgh Companion. She is an award-winning instructor of literature, culture, and writing. She completed her Ph.D.  in English at Cornell University in 2016 with minors in American Studies and Feminism, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. Dr. Yao’s postdoctoral, PhD, and MA work has been funded by competitive national grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. Her archival research has been supported by travel grants to the American Antiquarian Society, the Massachusetts Historical Society, and the College of the Library of Physicians of Philadelphia. Additional training thanks to the Center for American Visual Culture, the Futures of American Studies Institute at Dartmouth College, and the LGBT Leadership Academy at Cornell in Washington. For further information and CV, please see http://www.christineyao.com 

MemberDaniel Roger Schwarz

I am Frederic J. Whiton Professor of English Literature and Stephen H. Weiss Presidential Fellow at Cornell University, where he has taught since 1968. In 1998 I received Cornell’s College of Arts and Sciences Russell award for distinguished teaching, and the Weiss title also speaks to his teaching prowess. I am the author of the recently released Crises and Turmoil at the New York Times, 1999-2009 (Excelsior Edition of SUNY Press, 2012) which is getting a good deal of attention. Of late I have been blogging on the media for the Huffington Post. In recent years I have published In Defense of Reading: Teaching Literature in the Twenty-First Century (2008) in the prestigious Blackwell Manifesto series. My books include Reading the Modern British and Irish Novel, 1890-1930 (2004), Broadway Boogie Woogie: Damon Runyon and the Making of New York City Culture (2003), Imagining the Holocaust (1999), Rereading Conrad (2001), Reconfiguring Modernism: Explorations in the Relationship Between Modern Art and Modern Literature (1997), Narrative and Representation in Wallace Stevens (1993)–a Choice selection for best academic book of 1993; The Case for a Humanistic Poetics (1991), The Transformation of the English Novel, 1890-1930 (1989; revised 1995), Reading Joyce’s “Ulysses” (2004; orig. ed 1987); The Humanistic Heritage: Critical Theories of the English Novel from James to Hillis Miller (1986); Conrad: The Later Fiction (1982); Conrad: “Almayer’s Folly” through “Under Western Eyes” (1980); and Disraeli’s Fiction (1979). I have edited Joyce’s The Dead (1994) and Conrad’s The Secret Sharer (1997) in the Bedford Case Studies in Contemporary Criticism Series, and co-editor of Narrative and Culture (1994). I have also edited the Penguin Damon Runyon (2008). I served as consulting editor of the six-volume edition of The Early Novels of Benjamin Disraeli (2004) for which I wrote the General Introduction. I am General Editor of the multi-volume critical series Reading the Novel for which I wrote Reading the Modern British and Irish Novel, 1890-1930 (2004) and am now writing a 2 volume study on the European Novel. My former graduate students and NEH participants put together a festschrift in my honor entitled Reading Texts, Reading Lives: Essays in the Tradition of Humanistic Cultural Criticism in Honor of Daniel R. Schwarz, ed Helen Maxson and Dan Morris, co-published by University of Delaware Press and Rowman and Littlefield (2012).I have directed nine NEH seminars, and has lectured widely in the United States and abroad, including a number of lecture tours under the auspices of the academic programs of the USIS and State Department. I have held three endowed visiting professorships. I have published about 90 poems, some of which are available on his web page http://courses.cit.cornell.edu/drs6/ and a little fiction. I also write travel article for magazines and newspapers, and they too are on my web page I am Faculty President of the Cornell chapter of Phi Beta Kappa as well as the longtime Faculty Advisor to the English Club and the Men’s Varsity Tennis Team. He is active in the Presidential Research and College Scholar programs.My interests include travel (and writing about travel), art museums, theatre, and sports, especially swimming and playing tennis. I have two sons are Cornell graduates: David ’89, varsity men’s tennis coach at Brown after ten years at Middlebury where he coached his team to two Division Three National Team Championships and Jeffrey ’94, currently working in Boston as a Senior Associate Product Manager in the mutual fund industry. I am is married to Marcia Jacobson, a retired scholar who held the Hargis Professorship in American Literature at Auburn University.

MemberDustin Nash

Dustin Nash’s research straddles disciplinary boundaries through its exploration of the nexus between religion, politics, and identity in the formation of the Hebrew Bible, and the repercussions of scribal engagement with these categories in the development of Judaism. Dustin received his B.A. in 2004 from Luther College of Decorah, IA.  He was a visiting graduate student at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem from 2004-2005, received an MTS from Harvard Divinity School in 2007, an MA in Near Eastern Studies from Cornell University in 2011, and his PhD from the same institution in 2015.  He is currently Assistant Professor of Religion Studies at Muhlenberg College in Allentown, PA.  His courses there include “Jewish Traditions,” “Paths in Jewish Thought,” “Introduction to the Hebrew Bible,” “Reading Biblical Hebrew,” “Rabbinic Texts and Traditions,” “Speaking with the Divine: Divination, Shamanism, and Prophecy,” and “Myth, Religion, and Creation.”

MemberAma Bemma Adwetewa-Badu

My research focuses on politics, aesthetics, and identity construction and representation as articulated through avant-garde poetics and 20th/21st century Anglophone Black diasporic literature and culture, especially poetry. I am especially interested in the intersection of politics and aesthetics in literature, and the ways in which avant-garde poetics disrupt preconceived notions of Blackness  (and personhood) while constructing an open nature to the signs placed upon the (black) body. My most recent project, “Iterations of Identity: Black Diasporic Poetics and the Politics of Form,” positions these interests in a comparative aesthetic perspective, with a focus on examining avant-garde poetics through a primary lens of close-reading and aesthetics, including a study of the politics of aesthetics as dictated by neo-colonialism in West-Africa and the Caribbean, and racialized climates constructed by the global white gaze.