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MemberPaul Reilly

Currently, Visiting Senior Research Fellow in the Archaeological Computing Research Group at the University of Southampton, where I focus on two main areas of research: ontological transformations of archaeology in the digital, especially due to the developing alignments between virtual and physical words; exploring the significance of craft skills in field archaeology, which involves extensive cross-disciplinary collaboration with fine artists.I am a pioneer of data visualisation and virtual heritage. My involvement in archaeological computing began in 1982 while working on my PhD in which I developed and applied proto-GIS technology to the analysis of the archaeological landscape of the Isle of Man. My fascination with the potential and pitfalls of digital technologies to model, explore, present, translate, transform and re-present archaeological data and interpretation has expanded ever since. Now my peer-reviewed research output investigates the implications of additive manufacturing and their affordances for contemporary archaeology (see ORCID account: orcid.org/0000-0002-8067-8991).I am a past chairman and now life member of CAA (Computer Applications in Archaeology), Chairman of the CAA International Scientific Committee, a member of Virtual Heritage Network Ireland, CAA-Greece and the editorial board of Virtual Archaeology (virtualarchaeology.ru)In addition to my academic credentials I bring more than 23 years of wide international business experience in the IT and communications sector (with IBM) where I was worldwide leader for Knowledge brokering, professional and community development and complex solution deployment for the Telecommunications Industry business unit. I have also held leadership roles for strategy development, marketing, sales and research and development (where I was the industry leadership team interface to IBM Research Division). Previous to IBM I was a research fellow and free-lance field archaeologist working in UK, Germany, Austria, and Spain and pioneer of data visualisation techniques in archaeology.

MemberMegan Meredith-Lobay

Megan Meredith-Lobay is the digital humanities and social sciences analyst for ARC at UBC. In addition, Megan serves on the Compute Canada Humanities and Social Sciences National Team as well as the Software Carpentry National Team. She holds a PhD from the University of Cambridge in Archaeology where she used a variety of computing resources to investigate ritual landscapes in Late Iron Age/Early Medieval Scotland.  Megan worked at the University of Alberta where she supported research computing for the Faculty of Arts, and at the University of Oxford where she was the programme coordinator for Digital Social Research, an Economic and Social Research Council project to promote advanced ICT in Social Science research.

MemberSebastian Hageneuer

I am a Near Eastern Archaeologist based in Germany and focused on the methodology of reconstruction of ancient architecture. I received my degree at the Free University of Berlin, Germany and am still anrolled as a PhD student with a thesis about the influence and development of archaeological reconstruction drawings of the 19th and 20th century. During my time as a student, I started a company called Artefacts, that focused on creating visual reconstructions of ancient architecture and worked for various projects. I am currently a research assistant at the University of Cologne and work in the newly created Master-programm of Archaeoinformatics (Computational Archaeology) as a specialist in 3D Documentation and Modelling. I am also a Fellow for Innovations in Digital Teaching and explore new ways of communicating archaeological knowledge with modern technologies in an associated project.

MemberEthan Watrall

An anthropological archaeologist who has worked in Canada, the United States, Egypt, and the Sudan, Ethan Watrall is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Michigan State University.  He is Director of the Cultural Heritage Informatics Initiative and Director of the Digital Heritage Imaging & Innovation Lab (which is a partnership between the Department of Anthropology and The Lab for the Education and Advancement in Digital Research). Ethan is Director of Digital Heritage Projects at Matrix: The Center for Digital Humanities & Social Sciences, where he served as Associate Director from 2009-2020.  Ethan also serves as Adjunct Curator of Archaeology at the Michigan State University Museum. Broadly, Ethan’s scholarship focuses on the application of digital methods and computational approaches within archaeology and heritage. This focus expresses itself broadly in three domains: (1) publicly engaged digital heritage and archaeology; (2) digital documentation and preservation of tangible heritage and archaeological materials; and (3) building capacity and communities of practice in digital heritage and archaeology. The thematic thread that binds these domains together is one of preservation and access – leveraging digital methods and computational approaches to preserve and provide access to archaeological and heritage materials, collections, knowledge, and data in order to facilitate research, advance knowledge, fuel interpretation, and democratize understanding and appreciation of the past.

MemberMike Bishop

Field archaeologist and artefact specialist, experienced in post-excavation management and aerial/satellite image interpretation. Also a practising copy-editor, proofreader, indexer, and typesetter, as well as a published writer and volume editor, book illustrator, and translator. Founding editor of the Journal of Roman Military Equipment Studies. I am a specialist on the Roman army and Roman artefact studies with long-term interests in the archaeological applications of computing and all aspects of publishing in archaeology.

MemberJody Gordon

Jody Michael Gordon is an Associate Professor of Humanities and Social Sciences at Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston and an Assistant Director of the Athienou Archaeological Project (AAP). He received his Ph.D. in Classical Archaeology from the Department of Classics at the University of Cincinnati, where his dissertation involved an archaeological study of the effects of imperialism on local identities in Cyprus during the Hellenistic and Roman periods. In addition to working in Cyprus, Jody has excavated in Tunisia, Italy, Spain, and Greece, and his research interests include Roman archaeology, cultural identity, ancient imperialism, and computer applications in archaeology. See here for more on Jody’s teaching at Wentworth Institute of Technology.

MemberPatricia Murrieta-Flores

I’m the Director of the Digital Humanities Research Centre based at the Faculty of Humanities at the University of Chester. I’m also ERC Senior Researcher at the ‘Past in its Place Project’ (2014-2016) and Lecturer in Digital Humanities (from 2017). I’m part of the team of the HERA ‘Deepdead Project’ (2016-2019), a collaborator in the ‘Spatial Humanities Project’ at Lancaster University, and the European Cost Action ‘Reassembling the Republic of Letters’. My interest lies in the application of technologies for Humanities and her primary area of research is the Spatial Humanities and the investigation of different aspects of space, place and time using a range of technologies including GIS and Corpus Linguistic approaches. See some of my publications here: Patricia Murrieta-Flores in Academia.

MemberHenriette Roued-Cunliffe

I am an associate professor in the Section of Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums (GLAM), Department of Communication, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. I teach, research, and write about digital heritage, such as:

  • open data in the heritage sector
  • participatory heritage communities online (like family historians)
  • GLAM (Galleries, Libraries, Archives, and Museums) openness and online interaction