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MemberJeremiah Mercurio

I currently serve as Head of Humanities & History in the Columbia University Libraries. Previously, I held positions as a librarian and faculty member at Fairfield University and Haverford College. My doctoral dissertation, completed at the University of St Andrews, Scotland, focused on the role of language and fantasy in Anglophone Decadent fiction and illustration. My scholarly interests include Decadent literature and art, book studies, literary doodling, comparative media studies, and Appalachian literature.

MemberCaleb Andrew Milligan

I am a Doctoral Candidate and Graduate Teacher of Record in the Department of English at the University of Florida, specializing in comparative media studies, digital humanities, and embodied rhetorics. I teach, research, and publish broadly across intersections between literature, film, and digital media. My current research project, Post-Digital Touch: Writing Embodiments, Affective Interfaces, and Haptic Media, builds from my published and forthcoming work to account for the importance of touch to textual encounters in an age of ubiquitous computing devices which change the ways we compose our media and our bodily selves. In addition to my research agenda and teaching record, I am a 2016-2018 HASTAC scholar, founding member of the TRACE Innovation Initiative, and coordinator of interdisciplinary digital humanities conferences and workshops at UF.

MemberSteven Tötösy de Zepetnek

Steven Tötösy de Zepetnek’s http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/clcweblibrary/totosycv areas of scholarship include (comparative) literature and cultural studies; comparative media and communication studies; postcolonial studies; (im)migration and ethnic minority studies; digital humanities (new media and knowledge management); education incl. online education and design; editing and publishing (print & online); film and literature; audience studies; European, US-American, and Canadian cultures and literatures; history; bibliography; and conflict management and diversity training. Education: B.A. history and German studies (U of Western Ontario 1980), M.A. comparative literature (Carleton U 1983), B.Ed. history and English as a second language (U of Ottawa 1984), Ph.D. comparative literature (U of Alberta 1989). Teaching: comparative literature, German, and English U of Alberta 1984-2000; media and communication studies U of Halle-Wittenberg 2002-2011; comparative literature Purdue U 2000-; education & cultural studies Ghent U 2012-; and (distinguished) visiting professorships in the U.S., Europe, and Asia. Publications: single-authored books include Comparative Cultural Studies and the Future of the Humanities (forthcoming); Comparative Literature: Theory, Method, Application; The Social Dimensions of Fiction; edited volumes include Digital Humanities and the Study of Intermediality in Comparative Cultural Studies; Companion to Comparative Literature, World Literatures, and Comparative Cultural Studies; Mapping the World, Culture, and Border-crossing; Perspectives on Identity, Migration, and Displacement; Imre Kertész and Holocaust Literature; Comparative Hungarian Cultural Studies; Comparative Central European Holocaust Studies; The New Central and East European Culture; Comparative Cultural Studies and Michael Ondaatje’s Writing; 200+ articles in peer-reviewed journals; also publications in Chinese, French, German, Greek, Hungarian, Italian, Macedonian, Mara-thi, Polish, Portuguese, and Spanish translation. Editing and publishing 1981-current including series editor of Books in Comparative Cultural Studies (Purdue UP); Books in Comparative Culture, Media, and Communication Studies (Shaker Press); Research Institute for Comparative Literature Book Publishing Programme (U of Alber-ta); editor, CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture (Purdue UP), Canadian Review of Comparative Litera-ture/Revue Canadienne de Littérature Comparée (Canadian Comparative Literature Association / Association Canadienne de Littérature Comparée), and special issues of various journals. Languages: near-native English, native German and Hungarian, fluent French, reading Latin, Russian, Spanish, Italian.

DepositBeyond Broadcasting? To What Extent are Digital Technologies Enabling Progressive Uses of Media in a Post-Broadcasting Television Landscape?

This study is an attempt to explore the changes digital technologies are having on the experience of watching television. When new technologies are introduced, revolutionary claims are often made for the new media they help form. A frequent claim is that new media are more ‘progressive’ than older media forms, and encourage more democratic participation in the production and circulation of media content. This study aims to compare this claim with evidence of how viewing experiences are actually changing in practice. A further aspect of my inquiry is to consider the implications of this for broadcasting as currently constituted.