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MemberMatthew Scarborough

I was awarded my Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge in March 2017 for a dissertation on the linguistic prehistory and historical dialectology of the Aeolic dialects of Ancient Greek. Since October 2015 I have been also collaborating as a research associate with the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History on a new database of Indo-European cognate relations. My research interests can be subdivided into a handful of related topics:

  • Greek language and linguistics (from Mycenaean to the modern spoken language)
  • Ancient Greek dialect studies (from both literary and sub-literary sources)
  • Ancient Greek epigraphy and papyrology
  • Indo-European comparative linguistics and philology (including comparative myth and poetics)
  • Homer and other Early Greek poetry
  • Etymology and the Indo-European lexicon
  • Language classification, cladistics, and subgrouping methodologies in historical linguistics

MemberMekhola Gomes

I am a historian of early India. I am currently working on a book manuscript that traces the history of connections between inscriptions, ideations of rule, and practices of power within polities in the Deccan between 200-700 CE. I am also working on a new project that compares discourses and practices of power across early India and Indonesia through the epigraphic record. My broader areas of interest include epigraphy, kinship, and feminist theory.

MemberHenry Colburn

My research focuses on the art and archaeology of ancient Iran, and on the regions of the Near East, Eastern Mediterranean, and Central Asia that interacted with Iran prior to the advent of Islam. I am especially interested in reconstructing the social, cultural, political and even economic environments in which objects were created. I am also interested in how our modern knowledge of the ancient world was created, since this affects how we interpret objects and the conclusions we draw about the people who made them. I have held fellowships at the Harvard Art Museums and the Getty Research Institute, and teaching positions at the University of California, Irvine and the University of Southern California. I am now the Andrew W. Mellon Curatorial Fellow in Ancient Near Eastern Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

MemberJonathan Schmidt-Swartz

I am a doctoral candidate in the Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies at New York University focusing on Hebrew Bible and the Ancient Near East. My primary research interests and dissertation focus broadly on the intersection of ancient scribal culture, critical theory, and kingship. More specifically, my dissertation aims to trace the intellectual history and historiography of kingship found within the Hebrew Bible in more concrete terms, namely, by considering how scribes (re)interpreted sources they inherited.

MemberChristopher Hays

Christopher Hays is the D. Wilson Moore Associate Professor of Ancient Near Eastern Studies at Fuller Theological Seminary. He has previously held teaching and research positions at Emory University, Princeton Theological Seminary, and the University of Notre Dame Tantur Ecumenical Institute in Jerusalem. He has participated in archaeological research in Israel and conducts study trips there. In 2017-18, Hays is serving as president of the Society of Biblical Literature’s Pacific Coast region. Hays is the author of Hidden Riches: A Textbook for the Comparative Study of the Old Testament and the Ancient Near East (Westminster John Knox, 2014) and Death in the Iron Age II and in First Isaiah (Forschungen zum Alten Testament 79; Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2011). He is working on the Isaiah commentary for the Old Testament Library series, having translated the book for the Common English Bible and written the entry on Isaiah for the Oxford Encyclopedia of the Books of the Bible. In 2013, he was one of ten scholars around the world to receive the Manfred Lautenschlaeger Award for Theological Promise. Hays has published articles on diverse topics in journals such as the Journal of Near Eastern Studies, the Journal of Biblical Literature, Vetus Testamentum, Biblica, Zeitschrift für die Alttestamentliche Wissenschaft, Ugarit-Forschungen, Journal of Ancient Egyptian Interconnections, and the Journal of Theological Interpretation. He has also contributed essays to various edited volumes. Hays teaches courses in Old Testament and directs the master’s program in Ancient Near Eastern Studies in the School of Theology. His languages include Hebrew, Akkadian, Ugaritic, Aramaic, Greek, and Latin. Hays is ordained in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).

MemberSebastiaan (Bas) Godefridus Clercx

After finishing grammar school (“Gymnasium”, highest distinction) in Breda, the Netherlands, I took a BA in Classics at the University of Leiden and graduated in 2013 (highest distinction). In 2015 I finished a Research Master in Classics (highest distinction) with a thesis on emotional involvement in Homer’s Iliad as well as a Master in Comparative Indo-European linguistics with a thesis on the historical development of dental clusters in Latin. Before joining the Institut für klasissche Philologie at the HU, I taught Latin and Ancient Greek at a Dutch grammar school.