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MemberZachary Smith

…Ph.D. Student, Sport Studies—University of Tennessee

M.A., Comparative Religion—Western Michigan University

M.S., Sport Science—United States Sports Academy…

Zach is a PhD student and graduate teaching associate in Sport Studies at the University of Tennessee. Before Tennessee, he completed an MA in Comparative Religion at Western Michigan University. His academic interests revolve primarily around religion and physical cultures in the US, and he is a research assistant at the Center for the Study of Sport and Religion at the University of Tennessee. His dissertation is an ethnographic study of Christian mixed martial arts.

MemberAdrian Hermann

I am Full Professor of Religion and Society and Director of the Department of Religion Studies at Forum Internationale Wissenschaft of the University of Bonn, Germany. My work focuses on Method and Theory in the Study of Religion, Documentary Film, Global Christianity (especially in the Philippines), Buddhist Modernism, and the Religious History of the Globalized World. From 2002–2011 I studied Comparative Religion, Drama Studies, Sociology, and North American Literature in Munich, Bielefeld, and Basel. I received a PhD from the University of Basel, Switzerland based on a dissertation titled “Distinctions of Religion – Analyses of the modern discourse on ‘religion’ in world society and the problem of the differentiation of ‘religion’ in 19th and early 20th century Buddhist contexts”. In 2014/15 I was a Visiting Scholar at Utrecht University and Stanford University. From 2015–2017 I was Assistant Professor of Religious Studies and World Christianity at the University of Hamburg.

MemberDaniel Capper

Daniel Capper, Ph.D., since 2000 has been a professor in the Department of Philosophy and Religion at the University of Southern Mississippi, where he teaches Asian, Native American, and comparative religions. His interdisciplinary research, arising from anthropological, psychological, and environmental science perspectives, explores religious interactions with the nonhuman natural world. His many publications include the books <Guru Devotion and the American Buddhist Experience> and <Learning Love from a Tiger: Religious Experiences with Nature>.  Currently he is working on a project to extend Buddhist environmental ethics to space issues such as orbiting debris and mining on our moon, as can be found at the web site https://www.buddhismandspace.org/.  

MemberJeremy Garber

Jeremy Garber is the Academic Advising and Writing Center Coordinator and an Adjunct Instructor in Theology at the Iliff School of Theology. He is a graduate of the Ph.D. Religious Studies program in Theology, Philosophy, and Cultural Theory at the University of Denver and the Iliff School of Theology. Jeremy received his M.Div. from Associated Mennonite Biblical Seminary in Indiana, concentrating in theology and ethics. Dr. Garber’s dissertation was titled “‘Another Way’: The Pneumatology of Deleuzean Minoritarian Communal Interpretation in Scripture, the 16th Century Radical Reformation, and Alternative 21st century Anabaptist Community.” His primary research is on the idea of the Holy Spirit and the interpretation of popular culture in religious communities, using media theory and Deleuzean philosophy. Dr. Garber has published articles on the perception of Anabaptism in contemporary literature, the authority of Scripture in young adults, and theology in popular culture. He has also taught courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels in constructive theology, philosophy of religion, religion and popular culture, ethics, and comparative religion.