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MemberBruce Buchan

Bruce is an intellectual historian whose work traces the entanglement of European political thought with the experience of empire and colonisation, focussing on the Early Modern and Enlightenment periods. Bruce’s research seeks an understanding of concepts by bringing different fields of historical enquiry into productive conversation, most notably colonial history, histories of sound and noise, the history of science and medicine, and the history of ideas and political thought. His previous research on European perceptions of Indigenous government, the conceptual history of asymmetric warfare, and the meanings of civility, savagery and civilisation have appeared in a wide range of journals. Bruce’s research has been supported by a competitively awarded Discovery grants and a Future Fellowship from the Australian Research Council. His current research (with Linda Andersson Burnett) focusses on the conceptual prehistory of race in the teaching of medicine and moral philosophy, and in colonial travel during the Scottish Enlightenment.

MemberParkorn Wangpaiboonkit

Parkorn’s research considers realism in opera and music drama as a means of inventing racial difference across the colonial modern. His work diagnoses the practice of dramatizing and musicalizing another/an Other’s ethnicity as an imperial tool for race-making in the colonial liminal, historicizing the discourse on race and opera away from contemporary identity politics. His current project focuses on Western art practices in nineteenth-century Siam, and examines how the selective emulation and criticism of Italian opera at the Siamese court served as a discursive site for negotiating ethnological imperialism. Parkorn’s broader interests in opera studies include the performance of race and racialization, operatic masculinities and queer opera culture, new and old technologies of operatic sound reproduction, and colonial histories of Western opera. His article “Excavating operatic masculinity” is forthcoming with Cambridge Opera Journal.

MemberCorrie Decker

I am an associate professor of history at the University of California, Davis. I specialize in the history of gender, childhood, sexuality, and development in East Africa. My book, Mobilizing Zanzibari Women: The Struggle for Respectability and Self-Reliance in Colonial East Africa (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014), is a history of Muslim women’s professionalization and development in colonial Zanzibar. I have published several articles and book chapters, and co-authored with Elisabeth McMahon The Idea of Development in Africa: A History (Cambridge University Press, 2020). My current research investigates the history of puberty and maturation in twentieth-century eastern Africa.

MemberKyle Taylor Lucas

American Indian and Canada First Nations Studies Intersection of Colonial Oppression and Trauma Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) Urban Indian Survival Indigenous and Post-Colonial Studies Indigenous Women and Generational Trauma Criminal Justice System Reform Dismantling the Prison Industrial Complex Political Economy and Justice History of Race, Class, and Gender in Colonial U.S. Women of Color and Feminist Theory Environmental Justice Wild Salmon Recovery Water as a Human Right

MemberStephen Gapps

  I have a long-standing interest in public history and the history of early colonial Sydney. My PhD thesis was a history of historical reenactments and public commemorations of the past. I taught Public History at the University of Technology, Sydney, and worked extensively as consultant historian.   In 2011 I won the NSW Premiers History Prize for Regional and Community history with my book Cabrogal to Fairfield – A history of a multicultural community.   Since then I have held a position as a curator at the Australian National Maritime Museum. In 2014 I developed the exhibition War at Sea – The Navy in WWI and in 2015 curated the highly successful Black Armada – Australian support for Indonesian independence 1945-1949. In 2018 I am working on concept development of the new permanent displays at the museum that explore deep time and Australian maritime history.   In 2017 I was awarded the NSW State Library Merewether Fellowship. I have been working on a project on Australian resistance warfare for publication in May 2018 called The Sydney Wars – Conflict in the early colony 1788-1817.    

MemberNatasha Bailey

I am a cultural and gender historian, whose work focuses primarily on indigenous Nahua women in central Mexico during the early colonial period (early C16-mid C17). In my doctoral research I look at the participation of Nahua women in producing and selling the alcoholic beverage pulque and how their domination of the trade offered opportunities to negotiate their social position within a colonial state. My doctoral project brings together scholarship from gender history, indigenous history and drinking studies, pursuing an innovative methodology that combines source materials in Spanish, Nahuatl and visual languages.