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MemberLuis Restrepo

…ericanos en el siglo XXI: nuevos

itinerarios .  Pittsburgh, PA: IILI, 2011. 315-329.

“Memory and Justice” Native American Studies Across Time and Space. Edited by Oliver Scheiding.

Heidelberg: Heidelberg Universitätsverlag, 2010. 91-104.

“Creole Politics of Memory.” In Creole Subjects in the Colonial Americas. R. Bauer and J.A. Mazzotti,

eds. Univ. of North Carolina Press. Chapell Hill: 2009.  334-354.

“Colonial Thought” A Companion to Latin American Philosophy. Edited by Susana Nuccetelli, Ofelia

Schutte, and Otávio Bueno. New York: Blackwell, 2009. 36-52.

“El parque humano y la ci…

My main research field is Colonial Latin America, with interest in postcolonialism, literature and human rights, indigenous literatures of the Americas.  I currenly direct the Comparative Literature & Cultural Studies Program (MA & PhD) at the University of Arkansas. I have served in the MLA Executive Committee of Colonial Latin American Literature, as Co-Chair of the Latin American Studies Colombia Section. I serve on the editorial board of  Confluencia  (U of Northern Colorado), Perifrasis (U de Los Andes, Bogota), Estudios de Literatura Colombiana (U de Antioquia, Medellin), and Co-herencia (U Eafit, Medellin).  I am a U.S. Fulbright Scholar recipient to Colombia. I have been visiting professor at the Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Universidad de Antioquia, Universidad Eafit, and Universidad de Buenos Aires (Online).

MemberGerman Pallares

German is a PhD Candidate at the Stuart Weitzman school of Design interested in the history of modern architecture in Latin America and the United States with a focus on cultural relations, borders and politics. His work is interdisciplinary, drawing on fields such as Border and Chicano Studies, Environmental History, and Urbanism, and explores Post-colonial and De-colonial concepts that refine understandings of territories, nations, and migration as they relate to architectural and urban conditions. German has taught History & Theory courses in Mexico and the U.S.

MemberNatasha Bailey

I am a cultural and gender historian, whose work focuses primarily on indigenous Nahua women in central Mexico during the early colonial period (early C16-mid C17). In my doctoral research I look at the participation of Nahua women in producing and selling the alcoholic beverage pulque and how their domination of the trade offered opportunities to negotiate their social position within a colonial state. My doctoral project brings together scholarship from gender history, indigenous history and drinking studies, pursuing an innovative methodology that combines source materials in Spanish, Nahuatl and visual languages.

MemberHo'esta Mo'e'hahne

Ho’esta’s research examines the representational politics of Indigeneity, settler imperialism, and sexuality in North America. Ho’esta is at work on a book project that reads multi-ethnic literature, cinema, and visual and sonic cultures connected to Los Angeles and considers how the contemporary cultural politics of multi-racial, urban settler colonialism are shaped by historical and ongoing anti-Indigenous violence in the region. Ho’esta works at the intersections of Indigenous critical theory, feminist and queer theory, decolonial thought, literary, cinema, and cultural studies as well as transnational settler-colonial studies.