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MemberTeresa Marie Hooper

I teach and study the entire Medieval and Early Renaissance periods, but I specialize in Early Medieval Literature with a focus in Early Medieval England, medieval manuscripts, and a little Late Antiquity for good measure. My areas of interest for teaching and research purposes include (but often wander outside of): Early English codicology; Old English language and literature; memory studies; LA/medieval cultural geography, cosmography, and travel narratives; LA, medieval, and Early Modern ethnography and exploration; early Latin saint’s lives; Latin texts in English translation; monsters and teratology; Chaucerian dream poems; Renaissance poetry; and Ancient to modern drama. My current research interests include the textual and codicological history of the Beowulf-Manuscript (London, BL Cotton Vitellius A.xv, part 2), the earliest Latin St. Christopher legend, and the OE and Latin versions of Orosius’ History against the Pagans. 

MemberOlivia Richmond

I’m in my fourth year in History at Carleton. I moved to Ottawa three years ago from Kitchener, ON. This year, I am developing digital history skills by working with my classmates on digitizing Late Medieval folio pages and learning the mystic arts involved in digital codicology. My usual interests include medieval women, medieval Christianity and monasticism , disability studies, and sexuality and gender. This year I am working on an Honours research project, which will be a year long endeavour into late medieval convents, considering what images they were exposed to and how the cloister impacted the lives of the nuns living there.

MemberAnna Dorofeeva

I’m Zeno Karl Schindler Barker Junior Research Fellow at Durham University. My research interests span the cultural and intellectual history of the early and high Middle Ages, with a particular focus on book history. My most recent research output has focused on the Physiologus and on the codicology of miscellany manuscripts. I’m currently working on secret writing and cryptography in Durham Priory Library manuscripts from the ninth to the sixteenth centuries, examining community identity, the social experience of secrecy, and the boundary between graphic symbol and written word. If you want to get in touch, drop me an email to anna [dot] dorofeeva [at] durham [dt] ac [dot] uk.

MemberAbigail G. Robertson

I am a PhD candidate in Medieval Studies and a Bilinski Fellow in the English department at the University of New Mexico. My dissertation investigates the life of the legendary St. Swithun of Winchester who served as bishop in life and source for miracles in death. Synthesizing the disciplines of art history, history, architecture, and literature to illustrate the emergence of the cult that surfaced after Swithun’s death, my research details how the remains of the saint influenced the architecture of the cathedral into which his body was ultimately relocated, the religious writing that inspired pilgrims to visit his shrine, and the art objects that sought to represent his holiness in a way that would symbolize with gems and gold the power of his remains. I am also interested in paleography and codicology and how the digital humanities can aid in the enrichment of editing and cataloguing practices for the purpose of editions.

MemberAdrienne Williams Boyarin

Adrienne Williams Boyarin (PhD UC Berkeley, 2006) is Associate Professor of English and English Graduate Program Advisor at the University of Victoria in British Columbia, Canada. She is author of Miracles of the Virgin in Medieval England: Law and Jewishness in Marian Legends (D.S. Brewer 2010), praised as “elegantly written, scrupulously researched,” and a model of “codicological expertise” (Speculum 88.1, 2013). She is editor and translator of the alliterative Siege of Jerusalem (Broadview 2013, rev. in TLS) and Miracles of the Virgin in Middle English (Broadview 2015, rev. in TMR), and the founding Executive Editor of the journal Early Middle English (Arc Humanities/Amsterdam UP). Her research interests include Jewish-Christian polemics, medieval Anglo-Jewish history, Early Middle English (and the multilingual Early Middle English period broadly), manuscript studies, Marian texts, and gender studies. She is a former member of the MLA Executive Committee for TC Religion and Literature (2014-2019) and the MLA Delegate Assembly (2017-2019).  

MemberStephanie J. Lahey

…u CNRS, Villa Clythia, Fréjus, France.
2018 Jun — DHSI (Digital Humanities Summer Institute) 2018. Victoria, BC.
2018 Jan — American Academy in Rome, Winter School in Latin Paleography and Codicology. Roma, Italia.
2017 Jun — TNA–PAST (The National Archives Postgraduate Archival Skills Training), Medieval Legal Records Workshop. Richmond, UK.
2017 Jun — London International …

Stephanie J. Lahey is a SSHRC-funded PhD candidate at the University of Victoria, Canada, where she holds the Howard E. Petch Research Scholarship and a University of Victoria Fellowship. Her doctoral dissertation—a mixed-methodology, corpus-based study of the use of parchment ‘offcuts’ (low-quality byproducts of parchment manufacturing) in manuscripts produced in later medieval England—is jointly supervised by Dr. Iain Macleod Higgins (Victoria) and Dr. Erik Kwakkel (UBC iSchool). A recent Guest Researcher at Universiteit Leiden, she is the Editorial Assistant of Early Middle English, teaches at DHSI and at the University of Victoria, and serves on the Public Relations and Outreach Committee of the Canadian Society of Medievalists / Société canadienne des médiévistes. Her research interests include medieval codicology, palaeography, and manuscript production; parchment-manufacturing and use; medieval legal, technical, and reference literatures; quantitative and digital humanities; and public humanities.