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MemberTeresa Goddu

Teresa A. Goddu is Associate Professor of English and American Studies at Vanderbilt University. She is a specialist in nineteenth-century American literature and culture. Her research and teaching focus on slavery and antislavery, race and American culture, the history of the book, genre studies, as well as print, material and visual culture. She is the author of Gothic America: Narrative, History, and Nation (Columbia University Press) and Selling Antislavery: Abolition and Mass Media in Antebellum America (University of Pennsylvania Press). Her recent research focuses on the environmental humanities. She is writing a book-length study of contemporary U.S. climate fiction and she curates a climate fiction collection at the Vanderbilt library. 

MemberRuth Morgan

Ruth A. Morgan is an environmental historian and historian of science with a particular focus on Australia, the British Empire, and the Indian Ocean world. Ruth holds an Australian Research Council Discovery Early Career Researcher Award and is a Research Fellow in the National Centre for Australian Studies at Monash University. During 2017, she is based at the Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society at the LMU, Munich, Germany, where she holds an Alexander von Humboldt Foundation Postdoctoral Research Fellowship. Ruth is a member of the Executive Committee of the Australian Historical Association and the National Management Committee of the Australian Garden History Society. She is also Treasurer of the International Water History Association, Vice President of the International Commission on the History of Meteorology, and a member of the Monash Climate Change Communication Research Hub. She joined Monash in mid-2012 after completing her doctoral studies at The University of Western Australia in Perth.

MemberJulia Mattes

Hello 🙂 I am new to Humanities Commons. Please allow me to introduce myself. My name is Dr. Julia Mattes M.A. I am a researcher in prehistoric archaeology (and occasionally in art history). Due to a broad education and a liking for ‘thinking outside the box’ I enjoy to work in different fields of academia and have a wide-ranging expertise. I am a member of the Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Uppsala University as well as an independent scholar and holder of a number of grants. So far I mainly worked with European prehistoric cult and religion, ancient diseases, climate change, ancient art and art history.

Memberkatrina

Katrina Grant is an art historian with a background in the study of Early Modern Italy. Her research focuses on gardens and the history of landscapes, as well as the visual culture of theatre and festivals, and the connections between these two areas. Her PhD thesis (University of Melbourne, 2011) focused on the relationship between garden design and theatre in Early Modern Italy. She has published on the gardens of Lucca, history of emotions and set design, and artistic relationships between Britain and Italy in the eighteenth century. She has run the popular Melbourne Art Network website as editor and webmaster since 2010 and she is a founding editor of the online open-access art history journal emaj (emajartjournal.com). She is currently in charge of Marketing and Communications for the Art Association of Australia and New Zealand (AAANZ). She also has a background in educational research, including the use of new technologies for learning and assessment and worked as a Research Fellow at the Australian Council for Educational Research for several years. Her current research focuses on GIS and visualisation technologies and their potential for extending art historical research into new areas. Her main project is Digital Cartographies of the Roman Campagna, which is operating in collaboration with the British School at Rome. This project brings together historical maps with modern mapping technologies to recreate the lost landscape of the Roman Campagna, and draw together data and research from a variety of disciplines, including art and architectural history, social history, cultural geography and the history of climate and ecological change.

MemberKatrina Grant

Katrina Grant is an art historian with a background in the study of Early Modern Italy. Her research focuses on gardens and the history of landscapes, as well as the visual culture of theatre and festivals, and the connections between these two areas. She has published on the gardens of Lucca, history of emotions and set design, and artistic relationships between Britain and Italy in the eighteenth century. She has run the popular Melbourne Art Network website as editor and webmaster since 2010 and she is a founding editor of the online open-access art history journal emaj (emajartjournal.com). She is currently a lecturer at the Australian National University in the Centre for Digital HUmanities Research. She is also in charge of Marketing and Communications for the Art Association of Australia and New Zealand (AAANZ). She also has a background in educational research, including the use of new technologies for learning and assessment and worked as a Research Fellow at the Australian Council for Educational Research for several years. Her current research focuses on GIS and visualisation technologies and their potential for extending art historical research into new areas.

MemberTorsten Christian Kathke

My current research project analyzes popular non-fiction books diagnosing the state of society in the United States and Germany from 1968 through 1989. I contextualize them as cultural and economic products of their era. My project is located at the juncture of the history of ideas and an analysis of the cultural and economic contexts that translated these ideas to a mass audience.   The two decades following the societal upheavals of the 1960s led to feelings of rootlessness and uncertainty about the future for many in the middle classes, both in Germany and the United States. Newly emergent as well as newly perceived threats to home, hearth, and country filled the headlines and the abundant newscasts. A generation that had grown up believing in constant progress was taken aback by the change of direction. Elites who had so far been personally unaffected by the abundance of problems in their respective societies began to take notice.   In this climate, a streamlined and consolidated publishing industry sold this multitude of crises to concerned consumers in the form of popular books that translated academic debates about the ills of the world into sensationalist, reductive – and sometimes wildly speculative – but convincing jeremiads that left little room for hope if people, societies, or even the world did not change its ways.    Both in Germany and the United States, concerns over environmental issues found fertile ground. American publishers especially also sold tracts on the psychological problems and erosion of family values that postindustrial society seemingly brought with it. Books like Alvin Toffler’s Future Shock (1970), Christopher Lasch’s Haven in a Heartless World (1977), or the Club of Rome’s study on The Limits to Growth (1972) were both contributions to debates in the public sphere, as well as their originators; they were located at the intersection of academic debate and public outrage, and thus helped set the tone for an era that has been appropriately termed “The Age of Fracture”.

MemberAnnabell Engel

…IMC Leeds 2018:

session 301, Monday 2 July 2018: 16.30-18.00: New Approaches to a Climate History of the 13th and 14th Century: Tipping Points and Extreme Events

Paper 1311a: The Onset of the Little Ice Age in 14th-Century Central Europe: Evidence from Narrative Sources and Deliberations about the Utility of Other Source Types…

PhD Candidate within the Dantean Anomaly-project at GWZO, Leipzig.

MemberSharon Leon

Sharon M. Leon is an Associate Professor of History at Michigan State University, where she is developing projects on digital public history and digital networking projects related to enslaved communities in Maryland. Leon received her bachelors of arts degree in American Studies from Georgetown University in 1997 and her doctorate in American Studies from the University of Minnesota in 2004. Her first book, An Image of God: the Catholic Struggle with Eugenics, was published by the University of Chicago Press (May 2013). Prior to joining the History Department at MSU, Leon spent over thirteen years at George Mason University’s History Department at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media as Director of Public Projects, where she oversaw dozens of award-winning collaborations with library, museum, and archive partners from around the country. Leon continues to serve as the Director of the Omeka web publishing platform.

MemberCaroline Heitz

  I am an archaeologist working on prehistoric wetland sites and the archaeology of alpine spaces, currently based at the University of Bern in Switzerland. I did my studies in Prehistoric and Roman Archaeology, Archaeological Science, Social Anthropology and the History of Eastern Europe. Accordingly, I have a deep interest in inter- and transdisciplinarity research. In my PhD thesis titling ‘Ceramics beyond Cultures: A praxeological approach to mobility, entanglements and transformation in the northern Alpine space (3950-3800 BC)’, I combined different thing, action, cultural and social theories with qualitative and quantitative methods of archaeology and archaeometry. While this project aimed at inquiring the role of spatial mobility for transformations in Neolithic pottery production and consumption practices, my latest research is focussed on the mutuality of human-environment-relations.  

MemberTom White

I am currently finishing a monograph on late medieval manuscripts and their treatment from the medieval period to the modern day. ‘Working Theories of the Late Medieval Book: Manuscript Study in a Digital Age’ explores the figurative, interpretive and theoretical possibilities of manuscript study, with a particular focus on the works of Geoffrey Chaucer, vernacular romance, bookmaking recipes, The Book of Margery Kempe, The Book of Sir John Mandeville, and Thomas Hoccleve’s Series. Drawing on contemporary theory, this project looks to position manuscript studies in relation to the fields of media archeology and critical infrastructure studies. I’ve published some of this work in the journal Exemplaria and some has also appeared on the Birkbeck Material Texts Network Blog. I also write on political ecology, renewable energy, and the role of visual culture in a time of climate crisis. A recent article on these topics–part of a new project tentatively titled Three Energy Stories: Humber, Clyde, Thames–appeared in the Open Library of Humanities. I am contributing editor of the Glasgow Review of Books and have contributed to MAP Magazine, The Trouble, the LRB Blog, the History Workshop Blog, and the British Library Discovering Literature resource.