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MemberDominik Hagmann

…in Noricum‘ which aims to invetigate the rural settlement activities in a well-defined study area in the northern (now Lower Austrian) hinterland of the former Roman province of Noricum.

Further, I am involved in different projects to varying degrees. I manage various aspects of digital archaeology at the project cluster Roman Rural Landscapes lead by Günther Schörner which is settled at the Department of Classical Archaeology at the Faculty of Historical and Cultural Studies, University of Vienna:

Historical Land Use and Landscape Change in the Decapolis Region [finished 2017]
Val di Pesa and Val Orme as a Changing Rural Landscape: an integrated approach [finished 2019]
Molino San Vincenzo 
Modeling Roman Rural Landscapes

Additionally, I am a lecturer at the Department of Evolutionary Anthropology a…

University of Vienna (Vienna, Austria) | Master of Arts, Classical Archaeology, 2017
University of Vienna (Vienna, Austria) | Bachelor of Arts, Classical Archaeology, 2014

I am a digital {classical} archaeologist focusing on ancient Roman rural landscapes in Lower Austria, but also in whole Central Europe, the Italian Peninsula and the Levant. Currently I am working as an university assistant at the Department of Classical Archaeology at the University of Vienna.

MemberErin Averett

…B.A., Latin and Classical Archaeology, University of Georgia (1998)

M.A., Art History and Archaeology, University of Missouri (2000)

Ph.D., Art History and Archaeology, University of Missouri (2007)…

Erin Walcek Averett is Associate Professor of Archaeology at Creighton University and Assistant Director of the Athienou Archaeological Project on Cyprus. She earned her Ph.D. in Classical Archaeology at the University of Missouri in the Department of Art History and Archaeology in 2007.  She specializes in early Greek art and archaeology and the archaeology of Cyprus, focusing on terracotta figurines in the Geometric and Archaic periods in the Eastern Mediterranean. Dr. Averett has traveled and excavated throughout the Mediterranean and was a fellow of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens in Greece from 2002-2004.  Other areas of interest include Greek and Cypriot religion, points of contact between the Near East and the Aegean, gender in the ancient world, and digital archaeology.  She also serves as Adjunct Curator of Antiquities at the Joslyn Art Museum in Omaha, NE.

MemberJorrit Kelder

My academic background is in Classical Archaeology, with a special interest in the Eastern Mediterranean. My research has focused on aspects such as (ruler) iconography, interactions between various cultures and regions, long-distance trade and exchange, and the integration of textual and archaeological evidence . My PhD focused on the composition of the Mycenaean state, comparing Greece with known political entities in the Late Bronze Age Orient. I have worked for a number of fieldwork projects (in Egypt, Syria, Greece and Romania), served as a consultant for various exhibitions, and I am the author of a number of articles and monographs on the ancient world.

MemberSarah Bond

I am an Associate Professor in the Classics Department at the University of Iowa. I am interested in Roman, late antique, and early medieval history, archaeology, topography and GIS, Digital Humanities, and the role of Classics in pop culture (e.g., Game of Thrones). I obtained a BA in Classics and History with a minor in Classical Archaeology from the University of Virginia (2005). My PhD is in Ancient History from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2011). My book, Trade and Taboo: Disreputable Professionals in the Roman Mediterranean, was published with the University of Michigan Press (October, 2016) and looks at the lives of marginalized tradesmen like gravediggers and tanners. Follow me on Twitter @SarahEBond, read my Blog, or email me at sarah-bond@uiowa.edu .

MemberLinda R. Gosner

Linda Gosner studies Roman archaeology, art, and social history. Her research centers on local responses to Roman imperialism in rural and industrial landscapes of the western Mediterranean (primarily Spain, Portugal, and Sardinia). In particular, she studies the impact of empire on technology, craft production, labor practices, and everyday life in provincial communities. Linda’s current book project examines the transformation of mining communities and landscapes in the Iberian Peninsula following Roman conquest. Her work engages with broad questions about human-environment interaction, community and identity, labor history, mobility, and culture contact. In addition to her ongoing research in Spain and Portugal, Linda currently co-directs the Sinis Archaeological Project, a landscape survey project in west-central Sardinia, Italy. The project explores the diverse social and environmental factors impacting resource extraction, settlement patterns, and colonial interactions in the 1st millennium BCE through the Roman period. She is also a core collaborator with the Progetto S’Urachi excavations in Sardinia. Previously, Linda has conducted fieldwork—including excavation, pedestrian survey, and ceramic analysis—in Spain, Portugal, Italy, Egypt, Jordan, and Turkey, most recently co-leading a survey at the site of S’Urachi in Sardinia. At Michigan, Linda teaches courses in Classical Art and Archaeology and Classical Civilization. She is also a postdoctoral scholar with the Michigan Society of Fellows and a Research Affiliate with the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology. Linda holds a PhD from the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University. In fall 2020, Linda will join the faculty of Texas Tech University as an Assistant Professor of Classical Archaeology.

MemberJody Gordon

Jody Michael Gordon is an Associate Professor of Humanities and Social Sciences at Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston and an Assistant Director of the Athienou Archaeological Project (AAP). He received his Ph.D. in Classical Archaeology from the Department of Classics at the University of Cincinnati, where his dissertation involved an archaeological study of the effects of imperialism on local identities in Cyprus during the Hellenistic and Roman periods. In addition to working in Cyprus, Jody has excavated in Tunisia, Italy, Spain, and Greece, and his research interests include Roman archaeology, cultural identity, ancient imperialism, and computer applications in archaeology. See here for more on Jody’s teaching at Wentworth Institute of Technology.

MemberPrem Sai Ramani

I am an undergraduate student currently studying in my final year at the University of Western Ontario in London, Canada. While my academic interests are quite varied, I am primarily interested in analytical chemistry, particularly in its application to archaeological science, and classical archaeology. I have spent three seasons digging at the Roman military site of Vindolanda along Hadrian’s school with the Vindolanda Field School. During this time, I have had the opportunity to conduct research on a few leather samples in the lab. I am primarily interested in understanding the extent of the degradation of chemical information, as well as the potential to identify and confirm tanning agents and other markers of the tanning process through scientific analysis.