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MemberMarci McMahon

Marci R. McMahon is Associate Professor in the Literatures and Cultural Studies Department at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (UTRGV), with affiliations in the Gender and Women’s Studies program and Mexican American Studies program. She previously served as the Interim Director of the Mexican American Studies Program and Center at the University of Texas Pan American (UTPA) and University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (UTRGV), a bicultural and biliterate university along the US-Mexico border in South Texas and one of the largest Hispanic Serving Institutions in the nation. Her publications appear inThe Chicano Studies Reader: An Anthology of Aztlán, 3rdEdition; Aztlán: A Journal of Chicano StudiesChicana/Latina Studies: The Journal of MALCSFrontiers: A Journal of Women’s Studies;Journal of Equity & Excellence in Education; and Text & Performance Quarterly.She is the author of Domestic Negotiations: Gender, Nation, and Self-Fashioning in US Mexicana and Chicana Literature and Art(Rutgers University Press, 2013), the first interdisciplinary study to explore how US Mexicana and Chicana authors and artists across different historical periods and regions use domestic space to engage with recurring debates about race, gender, and immigration. Her second book Sounding Cultural Citizenship: Latinx Dramaturgy in Times of Crises extends this focus on performance, gender, and immigration, to explore critical moments in US history when citizenship has been redefined by Latinx communities and has been in crisis; the book argues that citizenship is performed through sound, with aurality and listening as vital to performances of citizenship.

MemberRebekah Ramsay

I am a history lecturer at the University of Central Asia, Naryn Campus. Recently, I completed my doctorate at Emory University, focused on cultural revolution and citizenship construction in early Soviet Kazakhstan. I have also begun preliminary work for a related project on the role of Central Asia in twentieth-century internationalism. Along with colleagues at UCA and partner institutions, I am interested in supporting projects related to Central Asian oral histories, cultural heritage, and digital humanities.

MemberDebra Rae Cohen

I spent many years as a journalist and critic before returning to academe, and much of my current work is concerned with the conversations and intersections between modernist literature and the mass media of the period. My co-edited collection, Broadcasting Modernism, examines the centrality of radio to modernist literary culture. I am now at work on “Sonic Citizenship: Intermedial Poetics and the BBC,” which extends the work of Broadcasting Modernism to explore the relations between the BBC and interwar print cultures. A former editor of Modernism/modernity, I continue to edit the modernism/activism blog “In These Times” for the journal’s Print Plus platform.

MemberAndrew J. Eisenberg

I am an ethnomusicologist and sound culture researcher specializing in urban Kenya. I received my PhD in ethnomusicology from Columbia University in 2009, with a dissertation on voice, place, and identity on Kenya’s Swahili coast. From 2011 to 2013, I carried out research on the recording industry in Nairobi as a postdoctoral research associate with Georgina Born’s ERC-funded project on music and digital technology at Oxford. Currently I am working on an ethnographic monograph on music, spatial relations, and cultural citizenship in urban Kenya, while also continuing my research on the recording industry in Nairobi.

MemberMegan Beckerich

I am a current MA student at the University of Chicago in the Master of Arts Program in the Humanities. I completed by thesis in 2018, and am continuing my Japanese language education. My thesis discussed censorship and gendered supernatural bodies in early Meiji period Japanese prints, and the influence of globalization and modernization had on the perception of such images. My interests include folklore, censorship in art, print history, Japan studies, and material culture studies. I have served on a student curatorial committee at the University of Chicago, contributing two labels to a small exhibit on the prints of Felix Buhot. Currently I am interning at the Cincinnati Art Museum as a Photography Conservation and Curation Intern. My main projects are working with Meiji period ambrotypes, and cyanotypes from the William Howard Taft diplomatic mission to Asia in 1905.