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MemberRachel Mikos

Currently completing a doctoral studies at Charles University in Prague on a linguistic analysis of abstraction and ambiguity in Mongolian riddles. Themes includes: “ruined” and “eroded” words, Tibetan, Sanskrit, and Chinese loanwords as traces of linguistic archeology; structural analysis of parallelism, layered and stepped riddles; missing ethnographic context; cosmological imagery generated through iconopeia or image-formation words; the function of deixis, movement and stasis in Mongolian riddles.

MemberKate Costello

Kate Costello is a doctoral candidate at the University of Oxford, specializing in modern Chinese literature and culture. Her doctoral thesis examines bilingualism, language games and word play in modern and contemporary experimental literature. Her research focuses on the relationship between bilingualism and linguistic experimentation, investigating the ways that multiple language competencies are deployed within a literary text. Drawing on the work of a broad range of authors that do not fit neatly into Sinophone, Francophone, or Anglophone canons, her thesis resituates these authors within a framework of interlingual writing. Paying special attention to the creative manipulation of sound, script, and syntax, her dissertation examines the playful, devious and irreverent ways that bilingual competencies manifest themselves in experimental writing. Her research interests extend to film, theatre, and text-based visual arts practices. Kate has a strong interest in linguistics and critical theory, and is co-convener of the Oxford Comparative Criticism and Translation Discussion Group. She has presented papers at major international conferences including the American Comparative Literature Association annual meeting, the Modern Language Association annual convention, the Association for Asian Studies Annual Conference, the Association for Chinese Literature and Comparative Literature biannual conference, and the Cognitive Futures in the Humanities annual conference. Kate is also a literary translator and she has translated short stories, poems and essays by Renshun Jin, Su Xian, and Wa Lan. Her translations have appeared in Washington Square ReviewChinese Arts and Letters, the LA Review of Books China Channel, Paper Republic and Quarterly Asia, as well as the 2018 Seoul International Writer’s Festival Anthology.  

MemberJane Hacking

My research interests are in the area of Second Language Acquisition, particularly L2 Phonology and the development of L2 reading, listening and speaking proficiency. I am committed to research-led teaching and also a strong proponent of community engagement and the transfer of knowledge generated within the academy to society at large. For the past few years I have worked actively with the public school system in Utah as it has rolled out school dual language immersion programs in Chinese, French, German, Portuguese, Spanish and most recently Russian. For the latter I have consulted on translation of the mathematics curriculum and selection of a literacy program from among those used in Russian primary schools. In my spare time, I ski, hike, read mystery novels and travel to challenging places.

MemberAnna Shields

I specialize in classical Chinese literature of the Tang, Five Dynasties, and Northern Song eras. My particular interests include literary history and the emergence of new literary genres and styles in late medieval China; the sociology of literature; and the role of emotions in classical literature. My first book, Crafting a Collection: The Cultural Contexts and Poetic Practice of the Collection from among the Flowers (Huajian ji), published by the Harvard Asia Center, examined the emergence of the song lyric in a path-breaking anthology. My recent book, One Who Knows Me: Friendship and Literary Culture in Mid-Tang China, explores the literary performance of friendship in ninth-century China through a wide range of genres, including letters, prefaces, exchange poetry, and funerary texts. Other recent and forthcoming publications investigate emotions in medieval letters; the compilation of anthologies of Tang literature in the Northern Song; and the cultural influence of Tang dynasty anecdote collections. I’ve served as President of the T’ang Studies Society since 2011, and I am an editorial board member of the Library of Chinese Humanities Chinese-English translation series, published by De Gruyter. Before coming to Princeton, I taught at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, where I served both as Director of the Honors College (2007-2011) and as associate professor in the Dept. of Modern Languages, Linguistics, and Intercultural Communications (2007-2015), and at the University of Arizona (1999-2006). I’m currently working on a new book that traces the shaping of the Tang dynasty literary legacy during the Five Dynasties and Northern Song.