Search

MemberSteven Seegel

…onal Lives and Deaths of Geographers in the Making of East Central Europe (University of Chicago Press, 2018)

Ukraine under Western Eyes (Harvard University Press, 2013)

Mapping Europe’s Borderlands: Russian Cartography in the Age of Empire (University of Chicago Press, 2012)…

Steven Seegel is Professor of Russian, East European, and Eurasian history at the University of Northern Colorado. He is the author of Map Men: Transnational Lives and Deaths of Geographers in the Making of East Central Europe (University of Chicago Press, 2018), Ukraine under Western Eyes (Harvard University Press, 2013), and Mapping Europe’s Borderlands: Russian Cartography in the Age of Empire (University of Chicago Press, 2012). He contributes to Chicago’s international history of cartography series and has translated over 300 entries from Russian and Polish for the US Holocaust Memorial Museum’s Encyclopedia of Camps and Ghettos, 1933-1945. He is a former director at Harvard of its Ukrainian Research Institute’s summer school and exchange program. Currently, he is a host on three channels at the New Books Network (NBN) for its podcasts, which now reach a million downloads monthly. 

MemberSimone Pinet

…Archipelagoes: Insular Fictions from Chivalric Romance to the Novel (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2011)

The Task of the Cleric: Cartography, Translation, and Economics in Thirteenth-Century Iberia (University of Toronto Press, 2016)
Selected recent chapters and articles :

 
“Clerical environments,” invited chapter for The Routledge Companion to Medieval Iberia: Unity and Diversity, Michael Gerli and Ryan …

I work at the intersection of discourses in medieval Iberian literatures, that is, I like asking questions that come up when one sees an apparently unrelated or distant sphere intervening in the literary, whether it be politics, or cartography, or economics, which is what I am currently working on for a book project. As an extension of this, I am interested in how the medieval intervenes in other periods, other geographies, that is, how the medieval informs (or disinforms) discourses about modernity or secularism or civilization, and how it shapes imperial and colonial projects, or contemporary Latin American literatures.