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MemberAnthony Rasmussen

I am a postdoctoral fellow with the University of California Institute for Mexico and the United States (UC MEXUS). My work explores, among other things, the intersection of aurality and gender, strategic vulnerability in musical performance, and what I call the transmusical–the under-explored areas between culturally-inflected definitions of “music” and “sound.” My current work concerns the socio-cultural aspects of whistle languages in contemporary Mexico City. In my free time I study requinto jarocho and tres cubano and make music with the experimental pop group, The Fantastic Toes.

MemberJanelle Peters

Dr. Peters holds degrees from the University of California, the University of Chicago, and Emory University. Her undergraduate thesis on the Dead Sea Scrolls was awarded High Honors. She was one of two recipients in Religious Studies of the Jacob K. Javits Fellowship for graduate studies (2004-2008). Her research appears in top peer-reviewed journals such as Biblica, JECH/APB, JSP, and Neotestamentica. She has presented at classics and religious studies conferences at universities such as Princeton and Tufts. Dr. Peters has contributed to national magazines such as America. She has taught at Dominican University, the University of St. Francis, Lake Superior State University, and Emory University. In addition to her academic pursuits, she has done environmental work with faith-based organizations (Floresta and La Jolla Presbyterian) in Oaxaca, edited the college newsletter of Revelle College at UCSD (Revellations), fed the homeless with Christian campus organizations at UCSD, served on the Education and Faith Committee of the Catholic Community at UCSD, translated business documents between French and English (San Diego, CA), tutored English and civics for Boat People SOS (Atlanta, GA), coordinated veterans and emergency preparedness programs for AmeriCorps and the American Red Cross (Chicago, IL), taught physical education at a charter school (Los Angeles, CA), worked on a political campaign (Los Angeles, CA), and coordinated research for University of California science research station.

MemberTravis Lau

Travis recently completed his doctorate at the University of Pennsylvania Department of English and is currently a postdoctoral teaching fellow at The University of Texas at Austin. His research interests include eighteenth- and nineteenth-century British literature, the history and theory of the novel, the history of medicine, disability studies, body studies, and gender and sexuality studies. He is currently working on a book project drawn from his dissertation, Prophylactic Fictions: Immunity and Biosecurity, which traces the British literary and cultural history of immunity and vaccination in relation to conceptions of national health and the rise of the security state. His academic writing has been published in Journal of Homosexuality, Romantic Circles, English Language Notes, and Digital Defoe. His creative writing has appeared in The Deaf Poets Society, Wordgathering, Assaracus, Rogue Agent, Up the Staircase Quarterly, and QDA: A Queer Disability Anthology (Handtype Press, 2015).

MemberMatthew Bokovoy

I am senior acquiring editor in the fields of Native American and Indigenous Studies, Cultural Anthropology and Ethnography, History of Anthropology, Non-fiction of the American West, and Literary Memoir of the American West. I conceived the major, social science documentary project, The Franz Boas Papers: Documentary Edition (25 vols.) with my colleagues at University of Nebraska Press, Regna Darnell of University of Western Ontario, and Martin Levitt of American Philosophical Society, funded by $2.5 million CAD from the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada. I am an American and European historian (PhD, Temple University, 1999) in intellectual, social, and cultural history of the 19th and 20th Century that writes about urban history, architecture and urban planning, historical memory, anthropological race theory, history of science, intellectuals and war, and California and US Southwest history. My work has been published in scholarly journals such as the Journal of the American Planning Association, Reviews in American History, AHA Perspectives, and the New Mexico Historical Review. I am author of The San Diego World’s Fairs and Southwestern Memory, 1880-1940 (University of New Mexico Press, 2005), a finalist for the San Diego Book Award. My reviews have been published in American Historical Review, Journal of American History, Journal of Religion, Journal of American Ethnic History, Pacific Historical Review, Western American Literature, Western Historical Quarterly, and New Mexico Historical Review. I am currently working on a new book, entitled “Manic-Depressive Illness: An Intellectual History of Bipolar Disorder from Hippocrates to Biological Psychiatry.” I play lead guitar in Red Cities (Lincoln, NE), a garage punk band on Modern Peasant Records. The Big Takeover Magazine said: “On breakneck blasters like ‘Worker Song’ and ‘Come Now Baby,’ Red Cities’ unashamedly summon slashing ‘Search and Destroy’ simulating riffs – tension-building, jet engine-explosive punk that exhilarates.” I am also a producer for Modern Peasant Records, having sponsored The Sinners’ Drunk on the Lord’s Day (MPR-013) and John Wayne’s Bitches’ Bitched Out (MPR-011). I blog about the history of punk rock, hardcore, and indy rock at the music podcast Doc Rockavoy’s Indy Music Garage.

MemberGladys Nubla

Gladys Nubla is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Intercollegiate Department of Asian American Studies (IDAAS) at Pitzer College, where she teaches literature, feminist/gender/sexuality studies, popular culture, and theories and research methods. Her book manuscript in progress, titled Children of Empire: Narratives of Sexuality and Human Rights in Filipinx/American Contact Zones, examines the figure of the sexualized native child across cultural and activist arenas, tracing the presence of the colonial past in Filipinx American and Philippine narratives of sexual awakening and sexual violation and in the institutional avenues for redress.

MemberPhilip Gentry

​Philip Gentry is a musicologist specializing in the history of music in the United States during the twentieth century, both popular and classical. He is particularly interested in theoretical questions of history, identity, and politics. His book What Will I Be: American Music and Cold War Identity (Oxford University Press, 2017) traces the changing relationship between music and identity in four diverse musical scenes: the R&B world of doo-wop pioneers the Orioles, the early film musicals of Doris Day, Asian American cabaret in San Francisco, and John Cage’s infamous silent piece 4’33”. He has also published an article on Leonard Bernstein’s second symphony and a review essay of the musical Hamilton. He is currently completing a comprehensive study of anti-communist blacklisting in the music industry in the 1950s, and is in the early stages of a new project investigating the relationship between past and present in contemporary music. Originally from the San Francisco Bay Area, Gentry earned his Ph.D. at UCLA and taught at the College of William & Mary before coming to the University of Delaware. At Delaware he teaches the music history sequence for undergraduates; graduate seminars in research methods and special topics; and literature surveys on symphonic, chamber and contemporary repertoires. He has also served a term as an at-large member of the national council of the American Musicological Society, and two terms as president of the society’s mid-Atlantic chapter. He lives in Philadelphia.