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MemberNila Namsechi

Nila Namsechi is currently a PhD candidate in Byzantine, Ottoman and Greek modern Studies at University of Birmingham where she offers the first systematic study of the Byzantine and Early Medieval Duchy of Naples from c650-1000.Drawing together over fifty years of textual and archaeological research, her thesis will address the transition period that Naples underwent during these centuries by examining the built environment and monumental topography of the city and the territory of Duchy of Naples. Furthermore, her thesis aims to understand the cultural impact of Byzantium alongside other regional cultures on Naples. She is also interested in the study of Persian literature and transcription of Medieval manuscripts in English.    

MemberHugo Lundhaug

– Professor of Biblical Reception and Early Christian Literature. – Scientific Director of the Interdisciplinary Research School Authoritative Texts and Their Reception (ATTR) [2017-2020] – Principal Investigator of ERC-project Storyworlds in Transition: Coptic Apocrypha in Changing Contexts in the Byzantine and Early Islamic Periods (APOCRYPHA) [2020-2025] – Principal Investigator of ERC-project New Contexts for Old Texts: Unorthodox Texts and Monastic Manuscript Culture in Fourth- and Fifth-Century Egypt (NEWCONT) [2012-2016]

MemberMichail Kitsos

I am a scholar of the history of Judaism and Christianity in late antiquity. I am interested in Jewish-Christian contacts and representations of the “other” in Christian and rabbinic multivocal literature composed in Ecclesiastical Greek, Ecclesiastical Latin, Syriac, and Aramaic (Palestinian and Babylonian) that originate from inside and outside the Eastern Roman Empire. In my research, examine the construction of “self” and “other” in light of polemical rhetoric. For more information on my research focus, current and future work see my personal website (michailkitsos.org).

MemberChance Bonar

I am a PhD candidate in the Committee on the Study of Religion (New Testament and Early Christianity subfield) at Harvard University, with a secondary concentration in Religion, Ethics, and Politics. I am currently working on a dissertation on the Shepherd of Hermas, a popular second-century Christian text containing visions, commandments, and parables given to Hermas. I demonstrate that the Shepherd depicts believers as enslaved to God, and argue that such a depiction is part of a broader Mediterranean conception of enslavement to deities. My goal is to demonstrate that early Christians are part of a network of ancient religious practitioners that understand their relationship to deities through the institution of enslavement, and that early Christianity is deeply embedded in the institution of enslavement. My research interests Greek and Coptic papyrology, enslavement in antiquity, religious and ethnic difference in the Hellenistic and Roman worlds, and the translation of late ancient and Byzantine apocryphal texts.