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MemberEmily Cock

I am a Leverhulme Early Career Research Fellow in the School of History, Archaeology and Religion at Cardiff University, and a BBC/AHRC New Generation Thinker for 2019. I completed my PhD at the University of Adelaide, and will soon publish a related book all about noses and plastic surgery in early modern British medicine and culture.

MemberScott Chaussée

…Chartered Institute for Archaeologists

Council of British Archaeology

Medieval Archaeology

International Society for Archaeological Prospection

Sussex Archaeology Society…

My Ph.D. thesis examines the material reflections of group identity, the dynamics of social change, and the evidence for political structures from the late Roman through the Middle Saxon period, ca AD 275-850. I am a self-employed archaeological geophysicist with global experience of both academic- and commercially-led surveys.

MemberFrancesco Iacono

I joined the Department of History, Culture and Civilization of the University of Bologna after winning the “Montalcini” program against the so-called “brain-drain” and after a long period of research at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research at the University of Cambridge (first with a fellowship from the Institute for Aegean Prehistory and then with a Marie Slodowska Curie IF). Previously, I had earned a Ph.D. at the Institute of Archeology, University College London, funded by the AHRC and the British School at Athens. My research interests range from prehistory and archeology of the Mediterranean (with particular attention to the Bronze Age), to social theory (in particular Marxist archeology) to the use of applications based on graph-theory, to cultural heritage studies (with specific attention to the so-called “difficult heritage”), and, finally, the history of the archaeological thought.

MemberAdam Parker

…2015. “The Fist-and-Phallus Pendant from Roman Catterick”, Britannia 46. 135-149.2015. “Excavations in the South Transept of St. Mary’s Abbey”, FORUM: The Journal of the Council for British Archaeology, Yorkshire 4. 71-76.2016. with Ross, C. “A New Phallic Carving from Roman Catterick”, Britannia 47. 271-279.2016. “Staring at Death: The Jet Gorgoneia of Roman Britain”, in Hoss, S. and Whitmore, A. (eds.) Small Finds and Ancient Social Practices in the Northwest Provinces of the Roman Empire. Oxford, Oxbow. 98-116.2016. “Shallow Surprises: Excavations in York’s St. Mary’s Abbey”, Medieval Archaeology 60 (2). 377-382….

Professionally I work as the Assistant Curator of Archaeology at the Yorkshire Museum, responsible for the curation, interpretation, documentation and advocacy of a designated archaeology collection relating to York city and North Yorkshire. The collection ranges from the Middle Palaeolithic to the early Post-Medieval periods, with particular focus on the Roman, Anglo-Scandinavian and Medieval periods of York’s history. I am additionally responsible for the training of volunteers in object handling, supervision of several post-graduate students and for the planning, managing and writing-up of small scale archaeological excavations.In an academic capacity I am currently undertaking PhD research with the Open University collating the evidence for and questioning the function of magic in Roman Britain. The project aims to look at the disparate evidence for magic in terms of its contextual significance, including: phallic imagery, inscribed and portable amulets, Jet and Amber objects, lamellae, figurines etc.

MemberMegan Meredith-Lobay

Megan Meredith-Lobay is the digital humanities and social sciences analyst for ARC at UBC. In addition, Megan serves on the Compute Canada Humanities and Social Sciences National Team as well as the Software Carpentry National Team. She holds a PhD from the University of Cambridge in Archaeology where she used a variety of computing resources to investigate ritual landscapes in Late Iron Age/Early Medieval Scotland.  Megan worked at the University of Alberta where she supported research computing for the Faculty of Arts, and at the University of Oxford where she was the programme coordinator for Digital Social Research, an Economic and Social Research Council project to promote advanced ICT in Social Science research.

MemberIoannis Georganas

Ioannis Georganas is Academic Director and Lecturer at Hellenic International Studies in the Arts. He holds an MA (1998) and a PhD (2003) in Archaeology from the University of Nottingham, and has worked for the British School at Athens, the Foundation of the Hellenic World, Lake Forest College, and the University of St Andrews. His research interests include the study of Early Iron Age burial customs and the construction of identities in Greece, as well as weapons and warfare in the Late Bronze and Early Iron Age Aegean. Ioannis has participated in excavations and field surveys in Greece (Kouphovouno, Lefkandi, Kastro-Kallithea, Praisos, Kenchreai) and Bulgaria (Halka Bunar). He served as President of the Athens-Greece Society of the Archaeological Institute of America (2005-2017) and he’s been Secretary of the Society of Ancient Military Historians (2013-present).

MemberMark Turin

Mark Turin (PhD, Linguistics, Leiden University, 2006) is an anthropologist, linguist and occasional radio presenter, and an Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia. From 2014-2018, Dr. Turin served as Chair of the First Nations and Endangered Languages Program and from 2016-2018, as Acting Co-Director of the University’s new Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies. Before joining UBC, he was an Associate Research Scientist with the South Asian Studies Council at Yale University, and the Founding Program Director of the Yale Himalaya Initiative. He continues to hold an appointment as Visiting Associate Professor at the Yale School Forestry & Environmental Studies. Prior to Yale, Dr. Turin worked a Research Associate at the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Cambridge. At UBC, Dr. Turin is an Associate Member of the Department of Asian Studies an Affiliate Member of the Institute of Asian Research.

MemberKirsty Millican

I completed my PhD from the University of Glasgow titled ‘Contextualising the Cropmark Record: The timber monuments of Neolithic Scotland’ in 2009. From 2009-10 I held a short-term lectureship at the University of of Aberdeen and from 2010 have worked for Historic Environment Scotland. I am currently Aerial Survey Projects Manager at Historic Environment Scotland and Affiliate Researcher (Archaeology) at the University of Glasgow. I am co-director of the Lochbrow Landscape Project, an archaeological survey project investigating the sites and landscapes at and around Lochbrow in Dumfries and Galloway. My research interests include the Neolithic and Early Bronze Age of Scotland, timber monumentality and the use of wood to build monuments, aerial archaeology and the interpretation of cropmarks, relationships between humans and the environment in prehistory, landscape archaeology and the integration of experiential and GIS approaches. My publications cover themes of Neolithic Scotland, cropmark archaeology, experiential and landscape archaeology.

MemberRoss Wilson

Dr Ross Wilson is a Senior Lecturer in the History department at the University of Chichester. He holds a BA (Hons) in Archaeology, an MA by Research in Archaeology and History (York, 2004) and a PhD in Archaeology and History (York, 2008). His doctoral thesis examined the experience of British soldiers on the Western Front and the representation of this experience within contemporary politics, media and culture. My research background is varied, taking approaches from archaeology, anthropology, literature and sociology to examine aspects of modern history and its representation in the present. I have research interests in modern British history and the history of the United States and I have written widely on issues of conflict, consumerism, identity, enslavement, literature, museums, heritage, urbanism, landscapes and material culture. In 2012, Routledge published my first book, Landscapes of the Western Front: Materiality during the Great War, which provided an anthropologically-informed examination of the British soldiers on the battlefields of France and Flanders during the First World War. This work then developed into an assessment of how the Great War (1914-1918) is valued and used across contemporary British society. This analysis of cultural history and heritage assesses how individuals and communities use the memory of the conflict to understand current political and social contexts. This work, Cultural Heritage of the Great War in Britain, was published by Routledge in July 2013. I continued my examination of the experience of the First World War with the 2014 publication with Routledge, New York and the First World War: shaping an American city. This work examined how the conflict of 1914-1918 had a dramatic effect on the citizens of New York, ensuring that a city of immigrants, which was perceived as a potential threat within the wider United States, was reformed during the war as a metropolis which was dedicated to the principles of the nation. In 2016, I published The Language of the Past with Bloomsbury. This study examined how we use references to the past to establish ideas and values in the present. From dinosaurs, cavemen, Egyptian pharaohs, Roman Emperors, medieval feudalism, Victorian culture and the Wild West, we incorporate the past as a metaphor, allusion or simile to guide us towards the future within contemporary society. I have developed my work within heritage studies and modern history with a book with Routledge in 2017, Natural History: heritage, place and politics. This assessed how the representation of natural history in museums, heritage sites, the media and within popular discourse, can be used to address how we relate to and understand our environment. In conjunction with this research, I have also been involved with the 1807 Commemorated project at the University of York which provided one of the major assessments of the marking of the bicentenary of the abolition of the slave trade in British museums in 2007. This work was published by Routledge in 2011 as Representing Enslavement and Abolition in Museums: Ambiguous Engagements. My current research examines the history and heritage of health and safety, the media representation and memory of the First World War, the history of New York, the role of ‘natural heritage’, digital heritage, memory studies and the role of museums and heritage sites as a mode of social and political reform.