Search

MemberGerman Pallares

German is a PhD Candidate at the Stuart Weitzman school of Design interested in the history of modern architecture in Latin America and the United States with a focus on cultural relations, borders and politics. His work is interdisciplinary, drawing on fields such as Border and Chicano Studies, Environmental History, and Urbanism, and explores Post-colonial and De-colonial concepts that refine understandings of territories, nations, and migration as they relate to architectural and urban conditions. German has taught History & Theory courses in Mexico and the U.S.

MemberCarla Sassi

My recent research work has been devoted to re-defining Scottish studies as a ‘theoretical borderland’ in relation to the Empire and postcolonialism, as well as to map out pathways and patterns of interdisciplinary conversation across these fields. I have also researched and published widely on contemporary Scottish literature and Scottish Modernism, my main interest in the latter field being a questioning of the Anglo-American canon and a re-evaluation of the role of ‘vernacular modernisms’. Other research interests lie in the field of critical theory, with a special focus on postcolonial theories, nationalism and literature, the historical novel, border theories and, more recently, issues of canonicity and canon formation, memory studies, eocriticism/environmental studies. While I have often developed my research work in collaboration with or within Scottish institutions, I have always privileged a comparative approach, networking with colleagues from different countries and different disciplinary backgrounds. Within ESSE, I collaborated with ASLS in setting up panels focused on Scottish studies (Turin 2010, Istanbul 2012, Kosice 2014, Galway 2016). Within MLA I organised two special sessions, respectively on “Transforming the Atlantic: Caribbean-Scottish (Post)Colonial Relations” (Seattle 2012) and on “Postcolonial Celts: reframing Celticity between Otherness and Authenticity”(2014). I have been invited to speak as keynote speaker/guest lecturer at major Institutions in the UK, including the Universities of Edinburgh, Stirling, Aberdeen, Glasgow, Manchester and the Open University in London, and in other countries, including Spain, France, Germany, China, Malaysia and the US. I have also delivered the 2013 “Scottish Literature International Lecture” at the Scottish Parliament, in Edinburgh. I was a Royal Society of Edinburgh Visiting Research Fellow at the University of Stirling in 2008, Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Glasgow in 2010/2011, and Affiliate Professor at the University of Glasgow in 2016/2017. I am currently co-editing a special issue of Humanities on “Environment, Ecology, Climate and ‘Nature’ in 21st Century Scottish Literature” (forthcoming). I am a member of the steering committee of the forthcoming 2020 IASSL Conference (Prague). I have been elected Convenor of IASSL (2020-23).

MemberBrett M. Neilson

I am Research Director at the Institute for Culture and Society, University of Western Sydney (http://www.uws.edu.au/ics/people/researchers/brett_neilson). Currently I coordinate the transnational research projects Transit Labour (http://transitlabour.asia) and Logistical Worlds (http://logisticalworlds.org). My main interests are in interdisciplinary studies of culture and society with a focus on borders, migration, labor, political theory and digital transformations. I have a disused blog at http://aldiqua.blogspot.com.au/ (one day I might even update it).

MemberKen Tadashi Oshima

Ken Tadashi Oshima is Professor in the Department of Architecture at the University of Washington, where he teaches in the areas of trans-national architectural history, theory, representation, and design. He has also been a visiting professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Design and taught at Columbia University and the University of British Columbia. He earned an A.B. degree, magna cum laude, in East Asian Studies and Visual & Environmental Studies from Harvard College, M. Arch. degree from U. C. Berkeley and Ph.D. in architectural history and theory from Columbia University. From 2003-5, he was a Robert and Lisa Sainsbury Fellow at the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures in London. Dr. Oshima’s publications include Kiyonori Kikutake: Between Land and Sea (Lars Müller/Harvard GSD, 2015), Architecturalized Asia (University of Hawaii Press/Hong Kong University Press, 2013), GLOBAL ENDS: towards the beginning (Toto, 2012), International Architecture in Interwar Japan: Constructing Kokusai Kenchiku (University of Washington Press, 2009) and Arata Isozaki (Phaidon, 2009). He curated “Tectonic Visions Between Land and Sea: Works of Kiyonori Kikutake” (Harvard GSD, 2012), “SANAA: Beyond Borders”” (Henry Art Gallery 2007-8), and co-curator of “Crafting a Modern World: The Architecture and Design of Antonin and Noemi Raymond” (University of Pennsylvania, UC Santa Barbara, Kamakura Museum of Modern Art, 2006-7). He served as President of the Society of Architectural Historians from 2016-18 and was an editor and contributor to Architecture + Urbanism for more than ten years, co-authoring the two-volume special issue, Visions of the Real: Modern Houses in the 20th Century (2000). His articles on the international context of architecture and urbanism in Japan have been published in The Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, Architectural Review, Architectural Theory Review, Kenchiku Bunka, Japan Architect, L’Architecture d’Aujourd’hui, and the AA Files.

MemberJosé Angel GARCÍA LANDA

I am a Senior lecturer in English at the University of Zaragoza (Spain), and I specialise in literary theory and narratology. I keep going back to (and perhaps working on) a number of ideas and their interface: the evolutionary nature of reality, the narrative articulation of representations, the dramatistic structure of the human world and mind, and the virtuality of the world generated by human attention and interactions. The study of “Evolutionary narratology” and of “The Great Theatre of the World” are two possible routes through this complex of ideas.

MemberPeter J Garcia

Dr. Peter J. García is Professor at California State University Northridge where he teaches in Anthropology, Music, and Chicana and Chicano Studies. His research in U.S. Latinx and Mexican  borderlands focuses on indigenous and settler music-culture intersectionalities and contact zones between and among New Mexican, Northern Mexican and Southwest  Native American (indigenous) communities and immigrant barrios on both sides of the US/Mexico border. García is also faculty advisor, directs and performs  with the CSUN Latin/x music ensemble and Mariachi “el Matador.”  García was Fulbright García-Robles grantee to Mexico in 2007 and continues ethnographic research on the annual peregrinacion (pilgrimage) in Magdalena de Kino (Sonora).