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MemberEthan Miller

…Ph.D., Social & Political Thought (Western Sydney University, 2015)
M.S., Geography (University of Massachusetts Amherst, 2011)
B.A., Environmental Studies (Bates College, 2000)…

  Ethan Miller is an activist-scholar, teacher, parent, and farmer committed to co-creating resilient and liberatory forms of collective livelihood. He is a member of the Community Economies Collective, a lecturer in politics, anthropology, and environmental studies at Bates College in Lewiston, Maine (USA), and has worked for the past eighteen years with an array of organizing and popular education projects including Grassroots Economic Organizing (GEO), the Data Commons Cooperative, the JED Collective, Wild Mountain Cooperative farm and homestead, and Land in Common community land trust. Ethan’s current research and writing seeks to challenge dominant concepts of “economy,” “society” and “environment,” and to develop cross-cutting and integrative conceptual tools to strengthen transformative, postcapitalist livelihood organizing efforts. His book, Ecological Livelihoods: Imagining Life Beyond Economy, Society, and Environment was released in March 2019 by the University of Minnesota Press.  

MemberRichard Greenfield

Richard Greenfield was born in Hemet, California, spent his early childhood in Southern California, and later lived in the Pacific Northwest. Richard Greenfield began teaching at New Mexico State University in 2009, where he teaches in the MFA program as well as undergraduate courses in creative writing. In 2016, he was a Fulbright US Scholar Fellow and Distinguished Visiting Professor at Ewha Woman’s University in Seoul, South Korea. In 2010, he was a Bates College Learning Associate. He has also been writer in residence at Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts, Willipa Bay Artist in Residence, the Atlantic Center for the Arts, and Seoul Art Space Yeonhui.  Recent courses have included classes on the sonnet form, surrealism, prose poetry, and contemporary poetics. From 2011-2013 he was the director of the creative writing program at NMSU. He is one of the founding editors of Apostrophe Books, a small press of poetry, which began publishing books in 2007. He is currently editor in chief of Puerto del Sol.

MemberMatteo Pangallo

…BA, Bates College (2003)

MA, King’s College London (2006)

PhD, University of Massachusetts Amherst (2012)…

Dr. Pangallo is a former Junior Fellow in the Society of Fellows at Harvard University and currently assistant professor of English at Virginia Commonwealth University. His primary areas of interest are early modern drama and theater history, with a focus upon connections between text, performance, and reception. He also has an interest in dramatic literature generally and the social and intellectual history of the book. His research focuses upon the complex connections between plays and the playhouses from which they emerged – their performance practices, modes of authorship and textual transmission, audiences and experiences of reception, and place within their historical context. As a scholar and a teacher, he is interested especially in the edges of theatrical and literary history, both how those edges transform our understanding of the center and how they can serve as entirely new centers themselves. Dr. Pangallo’s first book, Playwriting Playgoers in Shakespeare’s Theater (2017, University of Pennsylvania Press), focuses upon theatrical audiences and amateur playwriting in early modern England. Currently he is working on two books. “Theatrical Failure in Early Modern England” explores the causes and productive results of aesthetic, commercial, and material failure in domains such as the professional stage, court masque, household entertainment, and university play. “Strange Company: Foreign Performers in Medieval and Early Modern England” surveys the history of performers who toured to England from Spain, Italy, France, Ireland, Scotland, the Ottoman Empire, and elsewhere, establishing the role that they played in the development of early English theatrical culture and situating England’s theatrical Renaissance as one part of a global and more complexly transnational, transcultural theatrical Renaissance. Dr. Pangallo has designed and taught courses in early modern literature, dramatic literature, theater history, and book history at Bates College, Mount Holyoke College, Westfield State University, the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and Salem State University. He has been the recipient of grants from the Bibliographical Society of the United Kingdom, The Malone Society, and the Shakespeare Association of America, as well as a Jack Kent Cooke Foundation Scholarship and Jacob K. Javits Fellowship. Outside of his academic pursuits, Dr. Pangallo is a director and dramaturge and has worked for Salem Theatre Company as its founding artistic director, Rebel Shakespeare Company, and the Globe Theatre in London. He is also an award-winning book-collector.

MemberEliot Bates

Eliot Bates is an ethnomusicologist and recording engineer with a special interest in the social studies of technology. His research examines recording production and the social lives of musical instruments and studio recording technologies. A graduate of UC Berkeley (2008) and ACLS New Faculty Fellow (2010), he is currently an Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology at the Graduate Center at the City University of New York. He has also taught at the University of Birmingham (UK), Cornell University, and the University of Maryland, College Park. He is currently the Vice-President of the Society for Asian Music, and formerly served on the Board of the Society for Ethnomusicology. He has written two books: Digital Tradition: Arrangement and Labor in Istanbul’s Recording Studio Culture (Oxford University Press, 2016), and Music in Turkey: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture (Oxford University Press, 2011)—and, with Samantha Bennett, co-edited Critical Approaches to the Production of Music and Sound (Bloomsbury Academic, 2018). He is also a performer and recording artist of the 11-stringed oud.

MemberSheila A Brennan

…George Mason University, PhD, History (Major field US History; Minor fields: memory and museums; digital history)

University of Notre Dame, MA, American Studies

Bates College, BA, American Cultural Studies, (Minor in Spanish)…

I am a digital public historian and a program officer. I am the former Director of Strategic Initiatives at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media where I also worked as a Research Associate Professor in History and Art History at George Mason University. My newest publication, Stamping American Memory: Collectors, Citizens, and the Post, is available as an open access digital and print monograph from the University of Michigan’s Digital Culture Books series. It offers the first cultural history of stamp collecting through closely examining the Post Office’s commemorative stamp program. Designed to be saved as souvenirs, commemoratives circulated widely and stood as miniature memorials to carefully selected snapshots from the American past that also served the political needs of small interest groups. I began my career working in public museums, and served as the Director of Education and Public Programs at the U.S. Navy Museum in Washington, DC for seven years before I came to RRCHNM in 2005. At the Center, I directed and managed 30+ projects. The first project that I managed and worked on from start to finish was the Hurricane Digital Memory Bank. After HDMB, I became part of the original Omeka team (2007-present), and continued to work on many other digital humanities and cultural heritage projects. I have experience teaching, and leading and developing workshops that introduce digital humanities methods to scholars, GLAM professionals, and graduate students. I received my PhD in American and digital history from Mason, and earned an MA from the University of Notre Dame and BA from Bates College in American Studies. My research interests include public history, digital history, collecting practices, how museums use the web and digital platforms, museums and material culture, memory and memorialization, and US cultural history. I have co-authored essays on teaching the history of technology, doing oral history in the digital age, as well as white papers focused on developing digital public history projects and on increasing digital literacies of mid-career scholars. I have contributed to edited collections, including Debates in Digital Humanities 2016 and two volumes published by Smithsonian Institution Press. My dissertation, “Stamping American Memory: Stamp Collecting in the U.S. 1880s-1930s,” earned the 2010 Moroney Prize for Scholarship in Postal History. In 2012, I was awarded the University of Michigan Press-HASTAC Prize for Digital Humanities to create a new web project, Stamping American Memory, an open peer-reviewed, open access digital book and publication with University of Michigan Press. I present on topics in digital humanities and museums, online collecting, postal history, and digital public history.

MemberJoseph Stadolnik

I am a New Haven-based student of medieval English literature and culture, and will be a 2017-18 Junior Research Fellow at the Institute of Advanced Studies, University College London.  I am currently working on a book project on the rhetoric of the sciences and vernacular literary culture in late-medieval England. I am also interested in manuscript studies and medievalism in the Americas. I earned a Ph. D. in English from Yale University in spring 2017.