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MemberHeather D Baker

…omated Analysis of Cuneiform Languages (MTAAC), funded by SSHRC through the T-AP Digging into Data Challenge (2017–2019)
Royal Institutional Households in First Millennium BC Babylonia, funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF) (2009–2015)
BatCUL: Babylonian Texts Concerning the Urban Landscape (on ORACC, in preparation with graduate student assist…
…s of Ancient Western Asia. From the Early Bronze Age to the Fall of the Persian Empire. London & New York: Routledge.
Baker, H.D. & M. Jursa (eds) 2005. Approaching the Babylonian Economy. Proceedings of the START Project Symposium Held in Vienna, 1–3 July 2004. AOAT 330 Münster: Ugarit-Verlag.
Baker, H.D. 2004. The Archive of the Nappāḫu…

As an Assyriologist who has also trained in archaeology and gained considerable experience of Near Eastern excavation, my primary interest is in combining textual information and material culture in the study of Mesopotamian society and economy. I apply this approach to the study of the Babylonian city and to investigating house and household. I am currently PI of an international project, Machine Translation and Automated Analysis of Cuneiform Languages (MTAAC), funded by SSHRC through the Trans-Atlantic Platform Digging into Data Challenge. Research Interests My work focuses on the social, political and economic history and material culture of 1st millennium BC Mesopotamia, with a particular interest in Babylonian urbanism and the built environment, and in the Neo-Assyrian royal household. My research and publications cover the following topics:

  • urbanism and the built environment
  • religious architecture
  • house and household
  • integration of textual and archaeological data
  • Hellenistic Babylonia (especially the city of Uruk)
  • the Assyrian royal palace and household
  • onomastics and naming practices
  • prosopography
  • slavery
  • society and economy
  • political history
  • cuneiform archives and archival practices

Employment

  • 2014–present: Assistant Professor in Ancient Near Eastern History, Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations, University of Toronto
  • 2009—2014: Senior Postdoc and PI of project “Royal Institutional Households in First Millennium BC Mesopotamia,” Institut fūr Orientalistik, University of Vienna
  • 2003–2009: Postdoc, START Project “The Economic History of Babylonia in the First Millennium BC,” Institut fūr Orientalistik, University of Vienna
  • 1999–2002: Research Associate, State Archives of Assyria Project, University of Helsinki; from July 1999, Editor-in-Charge of The Prosopography of the Neo-Assyrian Empire
  • 1993–1998: Editorial Assistant/IT Assistant (part-time), A Lexicon of Greek Personal Names (a British Academy Major Research Project)
  • 1994–1995: Curator Grade G (part-time), Department of the Middle East, the British Museum
  • 1984–1989: Field Archaeologist employed on various excavation and post-excavation projects in England, Cyprus, Turkey, Jordan, and Iraq

MemberCarly L. Crouch

I am currently David Allan Hubbard Professor of Old Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California, where I teach and research in a number of areas relating to Hebrew Bible/Old Testament and Hebrew language and exegesis. My research focuses on the intersection of theology, ethics, and community identities, with a historical focus on the social and intellectual world of ancient Israel and a contemporary interest in the relevance of this work for twenty-first century ethics. I am especially interested in integrating insights from other disciplines, such as anthropology, refugee studies, and postcolonial theory, into biblical studies. This has, thus far, led to monographs examining the intersection between creation theology and ethics in the conduct of war (War and Ethics), the social context of Deuteronomy’s distinctively Israelite ethics (The Making of Israel), and the relationship between oaths of loyalty to the Assyrian king and Deuteronomy’s emphasis on exclusive loyalty to God (Israel and the Assyrians). My current project is aimed at understanding the multiple names by which the biblical text’s refer to the people of God, focusing in the first instance on how the destruction of Jerusalem by the Babylonians affected what it meant to be ‘Israel’ and ‘Judah’. I also have interests in Genesis, the Psalms, and the prophets. My previous post was at the University of Nottingham (UK), where I directed the Centre for Bible, Ethics and Theology, bringing together biblical and historical scholars with systematic and philosophical theologians to address contemporary issues in theology and religious studies. I have held research fellowships at Keble College and St John’s College in Oxford and at Fitzwilliam College and Gonville and Caius College in Cambridge.

MemberJordan Rosenblum

…; Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. February 28, 2019

“‘The wine of the region’: Wine, Beer, and the Translation fo Rabbinic Ritual from a Palestinian to a Babylonian Context,” Food as Concept/Symbol/Metaphor Program Unit, International Society of Biblical Literature Meeting, Rome, Italy, July 2019

“‘The wine of t…

My research focuses on the literature, law, and social history of the rabbinic movement. In particular, I am interested in how rabbinic food regulations enact and maintain distinct identities. I am currently writing a book entitled Rabbinic Drinking: What Beverages Teach Us About Rabbinic Literature (University of California Press; forthcoming in February 2020) and co-editing a volume entitled Feasting and Fasting: The History and Ethics of Jewish Food (New York University Press; forthcoming in December 2019).

MemberDustin Nash

…ications.” Annual Meeting of the Society of Biblical Literature, Hebrew Scriptures and Cognate Literature Section, Nov. 24, 2013.

“Enlil and Marduk, Nippur and Babylon: Old Babylonian Religious Ideology and the Geography of Religion.” Knowledge and Power in Ancient Iraq: An Academic Symposium Honoring David I. Owen. Oct. 29, 2010.

“My Brother! …

Dustin Nash’s research straddles disciplinary boundaries through its exploration of the nexus between religion, politics, and identity in the formation of the Hebrew Bible, and the repercussions of scribal engagement with these categories in the development of Judaism. Dustin received his B.A. in 2004 from Luther College of Decorah, IA.  He was a visiting graduate student at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem from 2004-2005, received an MTS from Harvard Divinity School in 2007, an MA in Near Eastern Studies from Cornell University in 2011, and his PhD from the same institution in 2015.  He is currently Assistant Professor of Religion Studies at Muhlenberg College in Allentown, PA.  His courses there include “Jewish Traditions,” “Paths in Jewish Thought,” “Introduction to the Hebrew Bible,” “Reading Biblical Hebrew,” “Rabbinic Texts and Traditions,” “Speaking with the Divine: Divination, Shamanism, and Prophecy,” and “Myth, Religion, and Creation.”