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MemberHeather D Baker

…omated Analysis of Cuneiform Languages (MTAAC), funded by SSHRC through the T-AP Digging into Data Challenge (2017–2019)
Royal Institutional Households in First Millennium BC Babylonia, funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF) (2009–2015)
BatCUL: Babylonian Texts Concerning the Urban Landscape (on ORACC, in preparation with graduate student assist…
…s of Ancient Western Asia. From the Early Bronze Age to the Fall of the Persian Empire. London & New York: Routledge.
Baker, H.D. & M. Jursa (eds) 2005. Approaching the Babylonian Economy. Proceedings of the START Project Symposium Held in Vienna, 1–3 July 2004. AOAT 330 Münster: Ugarit-Verlag.
Baker, H.D. 2004. The Archive of the Nappāḫu…

As an Assyriologist who has also trained in archaeology and gained considerable experience of Near Eastern excavation, my primary interest is in combining textual information and material culture in the study of Mesopotamian society and economy. I apply this approach to the study of the Babylonian city and to investigating house and household. I am currently PI of an international project, Machine Translation and Automated Analysis of Cuneiform Languages (MTAAC), funded by SSHRC through the Trans-Atlantic Platform Digging into Data Challenge. Research Interests My work focuses on the social, political and economic history and material culture of 1st millennium BC Mesopotamia, with a particular interest in Babylonian urbanism and the built environment, and in the Neo-Assyrian royal household. My research and publications cover the following topics:

  • urbanism and the built environment
  • religious architecture
  • house and household
  • integration of textual and archaeological data
  • Hellenistic Babylonia (especially the city of Uruk)
  • the Assyrian royal palace and household
  • onomastics and naming practices
  • prosopography
  • slavery
  • society and economy
  • political history
  • cuneiform archives and archival practices

Employment

  • 2014–present: Assistant Professor in Ancient Near Eastern History, Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations, University of Toronto
  • 2009—2014: Senior Postdoc and PI of project “Royal Institutional Households in First Millennium BC Mesopotamia,” Institut fūr Orientalistik, University of Vienna
  • 2003–2009: Postdoc, START Project “The Economic History of Babylonia in the First Millennium BC,” Institut fūr Orientalistik, University of Vienna
  • 1999–2002: Research Associate, State Archives of Assyria Project, University of Helsinki; from July 1999, Editor-in-Charge of The Prosopography of the Neo-Assyrian Empire
  • 1993–1998: Editorial Assistant/IT Assistant (part-time), A Lexicon of Greek Personal Names (a British Academy Major Research Project)
  • 1994–1995: Curator Grade G (part-time), Department of the Middle East, the British Museum
  • 1984–1989: Field Archaeologist employed on various excavation and post-excavation projects in England, Cyprus, Turkey, Jordan, and Iraq

MemberReuven Kiperwasser

… 22, 215-242 (Hebrew)
9. Kiperwasser R. and Shapira D. 2008, “Irano-Talmudica I: The Three-Legged Ass and Ridya in B. Ta’anit: Some Observations about Mythic Hydrology in the Babylonian Talmud and in Ancient Iran,” AJS Review 32:1, 101–116
10. Kiperwasser R. 2009, “The Visit of the Rural Sage: Text, Context and Intertext in a Rabbinic Narrative,…

https://hcommons.org/members/reuvenkiperwasser/

MemberGina Konstantopoulos

…Papers:
“Looking for Glinda: Wise Women and Benevolent Magic in Old Babylonian Literary Texts.” In Cult Practices in Ancient Literatures: Egyptian, Near Eastern and Graeco-Roman Narratives in a Cross-Cultural Perspective, eds. Franziska Naether. ISAW Papers 18, 2020. Available here: http://hdl.handle.net/2333.1/wwpzgxs5 
 
“Deities…

https://hcommons.org/members/gvkonsta/

MemberJacob Lauinger

… 

Books

 
2015 Following the Man of Yamhad: Settlement and Territory at Old Babylonian Alalah. Culture and History of the Ancient Near East 75. Leiden/Boston.
Reviews: A. Jacquet, Revue d’Assyriologie 111 (2017): 181-85; M. Sigrist, Revue
Biblique 124 (2017): 616.
2015 Texts and Contexts: Approaches to Textual Circulation and Transmiss…

Jacob Lauinger is an Assyriologist who focuses on Akkadian cuneiform texts of the first and second millennium B.C with an interest in peripheral (i.e. extra-Mesopotamian) dialects of Akkadian.  His research focuses on the social, legal, and economic history of the ancient Near East and, in particular, on approaching cuneiform tablets from both philological and archaeological perspectives in order to better define the social contexts in which they were written, used, and stored. In this regard, he is fortunate to serve as the epigrapher for three archeological excavations, Koç University’s Tell Atchana (Alalah) Excavations, the University of Toronto’s Tayinat Archaeological Project, and the Sirwan Regional Project’s Khani Masi Excavations.  His first book (Following the Man of Yamhad, Brill 2015) explored questions of land tenure and political territoriality at Middle Bronze Age Alalah, while his curreent book project focuses on the Satue of Idrimi from Late Bronze Age Alalah.

MemberChristopher Jones

….

Conference Presentations:

“Fragmentation, Leveling and a Lack of Effective Control: How Neo-Assyrian Kings Simultaneously Bolstered and Undermined Royal Authority in Babylonia and Beyond.” November 18-21, American Schools of Oriental Research Annual Meeting, Boston, Massachusetts [upcoming].

“A Great King Without Rival: The Literary …

I am a Ph.D student in the Department of History at Columbia University specializing in the Neo-Assyrian Empire. My dissertation, titled “Power and Elite Competition in the Neo-Assyrian Empire, 745-612 BC,” examines the careers of Assyrian provincial governors and other mid-level officials. Using several thousand official letters which survive from this period, as well as analytical tools borrowed from the fields of social network analysis, organizational communication, and leader-member exchange theory, I examine the social connections, status, and career progression of these officials. Understanding empire as a dynamic process enacting power relationships which are created and maintained through communication, I argue that the expansion of the Assyrian empire in the late eighth century simultaneously expanded the number of officials and made it more difficult for them to distinguish themselves. This resulted in an often-vicious competition for status, a decrease in effective communication, and less effective governance in the seventy years leading up to the empire’s collapse.

MemberMichail Kitsos

Michail Kitsos is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Middle East Studies at the University of Michigan specializing in the History of Judaism and Christianity in Late Antiquity. Kitsos also has an MA in Middle East Studies from the University of Michigan, an MA in Jewish Studies with a major in Rabbinics from Gratz College, Philadelphia, and an MA in Biblical Archaeology from the School of Theology, Department of Theology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. His BA is in Theology with a major in the Interpretation of the Old and the New Testament and Patristics from the School of Theology, Department of Theology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens.   His research examines intersectionality, particularly, the crossing of religious and societal boundaries and identity formation of religious groups in late antiquity and the early Byzantine period in the Mediterranean world. Specifically, by comparing Greek and Syriac anti-Jewish multivocal texts known as Adversus or Contra Iudaeos dialogues and Rabbinic multivocal narratives between rabbis and “others, Kitsos explores the mechanisms that create and reinforce the binary of “us” and “them” between religious communities and how this binary affects the process of self-representation on the part of the outsider group or “other.” His work examines the rhetorical use and function of the image of the “other” by both Christians and Rabbis in dialogical literature within its historical context, and it helps to understand the birth, formation, and diffusion of stereotypes—a process evident in late antiquity that still occurs today.   His research languages include Classical, Hellenistic/Koinē, Ecclesiastical, and Medieval Greek; Classical and Ecclesiastical Latin; Biblical and Rabbinic Hebrew; Palestinian and Babylonian Aramaic; Syriac and Coptic.

MemberDaniel McClellan

…Early Christology.” Biblical Interpretation 25.4–5 (2017): 647–62.

“Review of Susan Niditch, The Responsive Self: Personal Religion in Biblical Literature of the Neo-Babylonian and Persian Periods.” Journal of Hebrew Scriptures 17 (2017): 1–2.

“Review of Thomas Römer, The Invention of God.” Journal of Hebrew Scriptures 17 (2017…

I recently received my PhD from the University of Exeter, where I am wrote my doctoral dissertation under the supervision of Francesca Stavrakopoulou. My dissertation treats the concept of divine agency in the Hebrew Bible through the methodological lenses of cognitive linguistics and the cognitive science of religion. More specifically, it interrogates the notion of communicable agency as represented by the ark of the covenant and the messenger of YHWH. My thesis at Trinity Western University interrogated the conceptualization of deity in the Hebrew Bible through the application of cognitive linguistic frameworks. Among other things, it concluded that the conceptual category of deity was not clearly delineated and extended well beyond the traditional dichotomous view of deity as “Wholly Other.” My thesis at the University of Oxford, “Anti-Anthropomorphism and the Vorlage of LXX Exodus,” examined the case for translator exegesis in the so-called anti-anthropomorphic variants in the Septuagint. It was awarded the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies’ annual award for “Best Dissertation.” While my primary areas of specialization are early Israelite religion, textual criticism, and Second Temple Judaism, my work in cognitive linguistics and the cognitive science of religion has expanded my research interests into broader studies of religion, religious identity, and linguistics. I currently work for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints as a scripture translation supervisor, and for Brigham Young University as an adjunct instructor of ancient scripture.

MemberCarly L. Crouch

I am currently David Allan Hubbard Professor of Old Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California, where I teach and research in a number of areas relating to Hebrew Bible/Old Testament and Hebrew language and exegesis. My research focuses on the intersection of theology, ethics, and community identities, with a historical focus on the social and intellectual world of ancient Israel and a contemporary interest in the relevance of this work for twenty-first century ethics. I am especially interested in integrating insights from other disciplines, such as anthropology, refugee studies, and postcolonial theory, into biblical studies. This has led to monographs examining the intersection between creation theology and ethics in the conduct of war (War and Ethics), the social context of Deuteronomy’s distinctively Israelite ethics (The Making of Israel), and the relationship between oaths of loyalty to the Assyrian king and Deuteronomy’s emphasis on exclusive loyalty to God (Israel and the Assyrians), as well as a co-authored volume analysing scribal translation practice in the Iron Age (Translating Empire, with Jeremy M. Hutton). My current project incorporates trauma theory, social-scientific research on involuntary migration, and postcolonial theory to understand the consequences of the Babylonian exile on Israel and Judah, developing previous work on Israelite identity and theology and on the prophets. I also have interests in Genesis, the Psalms, and the prophets. My previous post was at the University of Nottingham (UK), where I directed the Centre for Bible, Ethics and Theology, bringing together biblical and historical scholars with systematic and philosophical theologians to address contemporary issues in theology and religious studies. I have held research fellowships at Keble College and St John’s College in Oxford and at Fitzwilliam College and Gonville and Caius College in Cambridge.