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MemberMarina Gerzic

ECR based at UWA. Lover of all things Shakespearean. I work for the ARC Centre for Excellence for the History of Emotions (1100-1800) as its National Administrative Officer. I also work as the Executive Administrator for the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies Inc., as the editorial assistant for the academic journal Parergon, and for the Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies at The University of Western Australia in both research and administrative roles.   My current research project examines popular culture depictions of Richard III, and analyses how these works interpret and visually embody Richard and his disability. My research explores and analyses the clash between Early Modern performance texts and youth culture/popular culture, in particular the appropriation of Shakespeare by youth culture/popular culture and the expropriation of youth culture in the manufacture and marketing of Shakespeare. I have taught courses in Shakespeare, film adaptation, and Australian literature. My doctoral work concerned millennial Shakespearean cinematic adaptations, specifically the intersection of Shakespeare and popular culture, as well as the function of music within these films. As well as the analysis of film versions of Shakespeare, I am also interested in how Shakespeare is adapted in new media, such as music, advertising, television, graphic novels and children’s literature. In particular, I am interested at how Australian authors adapt Shakespeare for children via a variety of forms and genres.

MemberJessica Carniel

Jessica Carniel is a Senior Lecturer in Humanities at the University of Southern Queensland, where she teaches on the history of Western ideas, ethics and human rights, and global migration. Her broad research interests include Australian and global immigration, cosmopolitan cultures, sporting communities and identities, cultural studies and gender studies. She has published widely on gender and ethnic identities in literature and sports cultures in multicultural Australia. Her study of Eurovision in Australia will be published by Palgrave Macmillan in late 2018.

MemberSophie Couchman

Sophie is a curator and public historian. She is an Honorary Research Fellow at La Trobe University and an Honorary Research Associate at Museums Victoria. She is interested in the place of migrants in Australia’s history and has researched and published in the field of Chinese-Australian history for many years. She has just completed work at Museums Victoria as exhibition curator on ‘British Migrants: Instant Australians?’, a travelling exhibition exploring British migration to Australia after World War II and its significance today. Sophie has a particular interest in the creation and circulation of visual representations and how they shape our understandings of Australia’s past. She developed the Chinese Australian Historical Images in Australia website (http://www.chia.chinesemuseum.com.au) as part of the completion of her doctorate. She is currently working on a joint project between La Trobe University and Museums Victoria, ‘The Camera at Work’, which explores how changes in photographic technologies and practices transformed the visual documentation of factory life in Melbourne, 1870s through to the present day. While Curator at the Chinese Museum in Melbourne Sophie led a number of notable projects including ‘Language, A Key to Survival: Cantonese-English Phrasebooks in Australia’, which won a Museums & Galleries National Award for ‘Interpretation, Learning and Audience Engagement’ in 2014. She also led the development of ‘Chungking Legation: Australia’s diplomatic mission in wartime China’ exhibition and book in 2015 and in 2014 the tour to six locations in China of ‘Bridge of Memories: Exploring identity, diversity, community — An Australian touring exhibition in China’.