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MemberAnke Finger

Anke Finger’s teaching and research focus on modernism, media studies, digital humanities, literature and other arts, aesthetics, and interculturality. Based on her early interests in art connections and multi-media, she specializes in the idea of the total artwork in modernism (Das Gesamtkunstwerk der Moderne, 2006), and she edited (with Danielle Follett) a collection of articles entitled The Aesthetics of the Total Artwork: On Borders and Fragments (2011). Her discussion of the total artwork ranges from conceptual art and atmospheres to architecture and design (The Death and Life of the Total Work of Art, 2015), including e-literature and multi-modal publishing. A co-founder and co-editor (2005-2015) of the multilingual ejournal  Flusser Studies, Anke Finger’s closely related scholarship in media studies and theory originates from her work on the Czech-Brazilian philosopher Vilém Flusser. She is co-author of the 2011 Introduction to Vilém Flusser (with shorter versions available in German and Portuguese) and serves on the advisory board of FlusserBrasil. Her latest Flusser project goes digital again, a cross-art collection composed with Scalar. The introduction to this multimodal publication is available on Vimeo. Her most recent publication in intercultural communication, a collection of essays entitled KulturConfusão: On German-Brazilian Interculturalities, was published by Walter de Gruyter in 2015. She also co-authors a blog on intercultural tool sets, “PracticingDifference,” with Manuela Wagner. Anke Finger serves as the Assistant Director of Digital Humanities and Media Studies (DHMS) at the UCONN Humanities Institute.

MemberNicole Rizzuto

Statement of Interest as Candidate for MLA’s Executive Committee LLC 20th and 21st Century English and Anglophone Literatures My interest in serving on the Executive Committee for Twentieth and Twenty-First Century English and Anglophone Literatures stems from my ongoing research within these fields and from my commitment to addressing the changing structure of the profession and its effects on knowledge production and scholarly activity. I take the current ideological and financial pressures placed on the humanities and literary studies occurring in the context of ecological and employment crises as challenges to be met on a number of fronts. I will work toward fomenting an inclusive atmosphere in the organization of sessions, panels, and other scholarly activities to encourage dialogue among all ranks of teacher-scholars across racial, gender, ethnic, sexual, and class identifications. I am interested in supporting a range of scholarship that foregrounds methodological debates about interpretative practices and ways of reading colonial, postcolonial, and neocolonial modernities; scholarship that reflects on the protocols of disciplinary and cross-disciplinary formations in era of an increasingly globalized and digitalized literary studies; and scholarship that considers how these debates, practices, and protocols are shaped by precarities emergent with the contraction of employment opportunities and resources for those working in the fields of twentieth and twenty-first century literatures. I will work to encourage the participation of graduate students, Early Career Researchers, and independent scholars in reimagining the intellectual landscape of the field and its professional practices. Finally, given the unevenly experienced effects of the climate crisis, I will support environmental humanities work that foregrounds marginalized perspectives while reconfiguring the boundaries of humanistic thought through engagement with social sciences, natural sciences, and science and technology research.

MemberYan (Amy) Tang

I am an incoming Assistant Professor in the Department of English at the University of the Fraser Valley. I recently completed my doctoral degree in English at the University of Victoria (2015–2020). My research interests include twentieth-century British literature, modernism, environmental humanities, and affect studies. My dissertation looks at the relationship between aesthetic feelings, literary forms, and the experience of history in twentieth-century novel series. I worked as Project Manager of the Routledge Encyclopedia of Modernism online (2015–2017) and Sessional Instructor of ENGL 135 “Academic Reading and Writing” at UVic (Fall 2017–Spring 2018). I co-founded and co-organized (with Kevin Tunnicliffe) of “The Mod Squad,” an interdisciplinary modernist reading group at UVic. With Alana Sayers (PhD candidate), I co-organized a BIPOC English Graduate Students Support Group at UVic in 2019.  

MemberCaitlin Duffy

…I co-host a horror movie podcast called Night of the Living Academic. You can listen to us on iTunes, Podcast Addict, Spotify, and Google Play.
‘This Mansion of Gloom’: Visualizing Edgar Allan Poe’s Atmospheres of Horror”
My blog.
I’m currently doing some freelance work for the Humanities Commons team, including co-organizing the #HCTwitterConf19, as well as building and leading the Humanities Com…

I’m an English literature Ph.D. candidate at Stony Brook University. My work focuses on 19th century American gothic literature and contemporary horror films. I’m currently working on my dissertation, which traces a thread between early American gothic fiction and contemporary American horror films through the dual lens of 19th century American liberalism and present-day American neoliberalism. In particular, I’m interested in the ways that these two modes of reasoning depict what it means to be American, as well as the ways that 19th-century American gothic texts and contemporary American horror films challenge, support, and subvert these depictions through the deployment of repeated figures and environments. Outside of my academic life, I’m a podcast aficionado, tea addict, and novice yogi. Some of my favorite days are spent going to the theatre.

MemberDaniel Williams

…e to Deception: L. P. Hartley and the Bildungsroman.” Anglia: Journal of English Philology 134.1 (2016): 43–69.

“Stem and Skein: Order and Evolution in Hopkins.” Victorian Poetry 53.4 (2015): 423–454.

“Atmospheres of Liberty: Ruskin in the Clouds.” ELH 82.1 (2015): 141–182.

“Rumor, Reputation, and Sensation in Tess of the d’Urbervilles.” NOVEL: A Forum on Fiction 46.1 (2013): 93–115.

Book Chapters

British Literature, Victorian Literature and Culture, Romanticism, South African Literature, Novel, Poetry, Literary Theory and Criticism, Philosophy, Intellectual History, Science, History of Science, Literature and Science, Mathematics and Literature, Law and Literature, Animal Studies

MemberLauren Osborne

My interests revolve broadly around perception and experience of religious texts. My areas of specialization include Islamic Studies, the Qur’an and Qur’anic Studies, Islam and music, and Sensory Studies in the study of religion. My current project is a book on meaning and experience across the sound, text, and performance of the recited Qur’an called, Recite! Aesthetics and Experience of the Recited Qur’an. In this work, I take a combined hermeneutic and ethnographic approach in considering the recited Qur’an in a wide range of contexts, illuminating the theoretical possibilities for interrelationships and discontinuities between different realms of meaning. In my research and teaching more broadly, I am interested in interactions between discursive and non-discursive meanings of religious texts—the Qur’an most specifically—, as well as sense experience within Islamic Studies and Religious Studies. I am currently the co-chair of the Qur’an Unit in the American Academy of Religion.

Memberdavid41448

…Phenomenology: Lifeworld, Natural Attitude, Homeworld and Place, in K. Galvin, ed. A Handbook of Well-being. London: Routledge, forthcoming.

2017    Architecture, Place, and Phenomenology: Buildings as Lifeworlds, Atmospheres, and Environmental Wholes, a chapter in Janet Donohoe (ed.), Phenomenology and Place (pp. 247-263). Lanham, MD: Roman and Littlefield.

2017    A Phenomenological and Hermeneutic Reading of Rem Koolhaas…

David Seamon (PhD, 1977, Clark University, Worcester, Massachusetts USA) is a Professor of Environment-Behavior and Place Studies in the Department of Architecture at Kansas State University in Manhattan, Kansas, USA. Trained in behavioral geography and environment-behavior research, he is interested in a phenomenological approach to place, architecture, environmental experience, and environmental design as place making. His books include: A Geography of the Lifeworld (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1979/Routledge Revival series, 2015); The Human Experience of Space and Place (edited with Anne Buttimer, London: Croom Helm, 1980); Dwelling, Place and Environment: Toward a Phenomenology of Person and World (edited with Robert Mugerauer; New York: Columbia University Press, 1989); Dwelling, Seeing, and Designing: Toward a Phenomenological Ecology (Albany, New York: State University of New York Press, 1993); and Goethe’s Way of Science: A Phenomenology of Nature (edited with Arthur Zajonc, Albany, New York: State University of New York Press, 1998). Seamon’s A GEOGRAPHY OF THE LIFEWORLD was reprinted in Routledge’s “Revival” series in 2015. His book, LIFE TAKES PLACE, will be published by Routledge in 2018. He is editor of Environmental and Architectural Phenomenology, which celebrated its 25th year of publication in 2014. DOIs for many of my books, articles, and chapters are available at the ORCHID website at https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3709-7398 Dr. David Seamon, Architecture Department, Kansas State University, 211 Seaton Hall, Manhattan, KS. 66506-2901 USA. Tel 1-785-532-5953; triad@ksu.edu Most of his writings, including articles and book chapters, are available at: https://ksu.academia.edu/DavidSeamon

MemberErik Malcolm Champion

UNESCO Chair of Cultural Heritage and Visualisation, and Professor at Media, Creative Arts and Social Inquiry, in the Humanities Faculty of Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia. The purpose of the Chair is to promote an integrated system of research, training, information and documentation on virtual heritage sites and facilitate collaboration between high-level, internationally-recognized researchers and teaching staff of Curtin University and other institutions throughout the world.   My recent books are Critical Gaming: Interactive History and Virtual Heritage for Routledge’s Digital Research in the Arts and Humanities Series, Playing with the Past (Springer, 2011), editor of Game Mods: Design, Theory and Criticism (ETC Press, 2012) and co-editor of  Cultural Heritage Infrastructures in Digital Humanities (Routledge, 2017).