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MemberHeather D Baker

…’s Work Study Program)
Nappahu: Digital Corpus of Neo-Babylonian Texts from the Nappahu Archive (on ORACC, in preparation)
Neo-Assyrian Bibliography (on Zotero)
PNAo: The Prosopography of the Neo-Assyrian Empire Online (on ORACC)

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…Books

Baker, H. D. 2017. Neo-Assyrian Specialists. Crafts, Offices, and Other Professional Designations. Prosopography of the Neo-Assyrian Empire, Vol. 4/I. Helsinki: Neo-Assyrian Text Corpus Project & Finnish Foundation for Assyriological Research.
Baker, H.D. &…

As an Assyriologist who has also trained in archaeology and gained considerable experience of Near Eastern excavation, my primary interest is in combining textual information and material culture in the study of Mesopotamian society and economy. I apply this approach to the study of the Babylonian city and to investigating house and household. I am currently PI of an international project, Machine Translation and Automated Analysis of Cuneiform Languages (MTAAC), funded by SSHRC through the Trans-Atlantic Platform Digging into Data Challenge. Research Interests My work focuses on the social, political and economic history and material culture of 1st millennium BC Mesopotamia, with a particular interest in Babylonian urbanism and the built environment, and in the Neo-Assyrian royal household. My research and publications cover the following topics:

  • urbanism and the built environment
  • religious architecture
  • house and household
  • integration of textual and archaeological data
  • Hellenistic Babylonia (especially the city of Uruk)
  • the Assyrian royal palace and household
  • onomastics and naming practices
  • prosopography
  • slavery
  • society and economy
  • political history
  • cuneiform archives and archival practices

Employment

  • 2014–present: Assistant Professor in Ancient Near Eastern History, Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations, University of Toronto
  • 2009—2014: Senior Postdoc and PI of project “Royal Institutional Households in First Millennium BC Mesopotamia,” Institut fūr Orientalistik, University of Vienna
  • 2003–2009: Postdoc, START Project “The Economic History of Babylonia in the First Millennium BC,” Institut fūr Orientalistik, University of Vienna
  • 1999–2002: Research Associate, State Archives of Assyria Project, University of Helsinki; from July 1999, Editor-in-Charge of The Prosopography of the Neo-Assyrian Empire
  • 1993–1998: Editorial Assistant/IT Assistant (part-time), A Lexicon of Greek Personal Names (a British Academy Major Research Project)
  • 1994–1995: Curator Grade G (part-time), Department of the Middle East, the British Museum
  • 1984–1989: Field Archaeologist employed on various excavation and post-excavation projects in England, Cyprus, Turkey, Jordan, and Iraq

MemberChristopher Jones

…I have three major projects at present:

First, my dissertation on competition and communication in the Assyrian empire in the eighth and seventh centuries BC.

Second, I am a square supervisor for the 2017 dig season as part of the Bar-Ilan University Expedition to Tell es-S…

I am a Ph.D student in the Department of History at Columbia University specializing in the Neo-Assyrian Empire. My dissertation, titled “Power and Elite Competition in the Neo-Assyrian Empire, 745-612 BC,” seeks to understand the structure of the Assyrian imperial system through studying communication and competition between government officials for power and status.

MemberDavide Nadali

…uation certificate in Near Eastern Archaeology with Prof. Paolo Matthiae – Grade: 110/110 cum laude (in 2002) with a thesis on the “Assyrian Armies of Sennacherib and Assurbanipal: Compositional Study of the depiction of the battles”.
PhD in Near Eastern Archaeology …
…iche di una battaglia in campo aperto, SMEA XLVI/1, pp. 59-78.
2005a The Representations of Foreign Soldiers and Their Employment in the Assyrian Army, in W. H. van Soldt (ed.), Ethnicity in Ancient Mesopotamia. Papers read at the 48th Rencontre Assyriologique Internationale, …

  • Lecturer in Near Eastern Archaeology at the Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Antiquities, Faculty of Humanities.

MemberMark Weeden

…kkadian words for barley and the god Ḫaya. Welt des Orients 32. Pp. 77-107.

— 2010: Tuwati and Wasusarma. Imitating the behaviour of Assyria. Collon, D. and George, A.R. (eds) Iraq 72 (In Honour of the Seventieth Birthday of Professor David Hawkins). Pp. 39-62.

— 2011…

Senior Lecturer in Ancient Near Eastern Studies, SOAS, University of London

MemberCarly L. Crouch

I am currently David Allan Hubbard Professor of Old Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California, where I teach and research in a number of areas relating to Hebrew Bible/Old Testament and Hebrew language and exegesis. My research focuses on the intersection of theology, ethics, and community identities, with a historical focus on the social and intellectual world of ancient Israel and a contemporary interest in the relevance of this work for twenty-first century ethics. I am especially interested in integrating insights from other disciplines, such as anthropology, refugee studies, and postcolonial theory, into biblical studies. This has, thus far, led to monographs examining the intersection between creation theology and ethics in the conduct of war (War and Ethics), the social context of Deuteronomy’s distinctively Israelite ethics (The Making of Israel), and the relationship between oaths of loyalty to the Assyrian king and Deuteronomy’s emphasis on exclusive loyalty to God (Israel and the Assyrians). My current project is aimed at understanding the multiple names by which the biblical text’s refer to the people of God, focusing in the first instance on how the destruction of Jerusalem by the Babylonians affected what it meant to be ‘Israel’ and ‘Judah’. I also have interests in Genesis, the Psalms, and the prophets. My previous post was at the University of Nottingham (UK), where I directed the Centre for Bible, Ethics and Theology, bringing together biblical and historical scholars with systematic and philosophical theologians to address contemporary issues in theology and religious studies. I have held research fellowships at Keble College and St John’s College in Oxford and at Fitzwilliam College and Gonville and Caius College in Cambridge.

MemberAysha W. Musa

…Track Changes, Issue 9, pp. 130-133.

2015
Book Review: Sherry Lou Macgregor, Beyond Hearth and Home; Women in the Public Sphere in Neo-Assyrian Society’, Palestine Exploration Quarterly, Volume 14, pp. 256-260….

Aysha W. Musa is a fully funded fourth year PhD student with the Sheffield Institute for Interdisciplinary Biblical Studies (SIIBS) and the School of English Literature at the University of Sheffield. She is working in the field of Gender and the Bible, focusing on Jael’s performances of gender in Judges 4 and 5. Aysha is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (FHEA) and is currently a coordinator for the Sheffield Gender History Group and an Academic Tutor for the Realising Opportunities outreach programme.

MemberJonathan Valk


2019. The Origins of the Assyrian King List. Journal of Ancient Near Eastern History 6.1: 1-17.
2016. “They Enjoy Syrup and Ghee at Tables of Silver and Gold”: Infant Loss in Ancient Mesopotamia. ­Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient 59.5: 695-74…

University Lecturer in Assyriology at Leiden University specializing in the social and economic history of the Ancient Near East and in the theory of collective identity.

MemberChristopher Hays

…al, and Historical Contexts of Ancient Israel. Edited by Jonathan S. Greer, John W. Hilber, and John H. Walton. Baker Academic, 2018.

“Assyria,” (first author, with Peter Machinist) in The World Around the Old Testament, Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2016.

“A Story To…

Christopher Hays is the D. Wilson Moore Associate Professor of Ancient Near Eastern Studies at Fuller Theological Seminary. He has previously held teaching and research positions at Emory University, Princeton Theological Seminary, and the University of Notre Dame Tantur Ecumenical Institute in Jerusalem. He has participated in archaeological research in Israel and conducts study trips there. In 2017-18, Hays is serving as president of the Society of Biblical Literature’s Pacific Coast region. Hays is the author of Hidden Riches: A Textbook for the Comparative Study of the Old Testament and the Ancient Near East (Westminster John Knox, 2014) and Death in the Iron Age II and in First Isaiah (Forschungen zum Alten Testament 79; Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2011). He is working on the Isaiah commentary for the Old Testament Library series, having translated the book for the Common English Bible and written the entry on Isaiah for the Oxford Encyclopedia of the Books of the Bible. In 2013, he was one of ten scholars around the world to receive the Manfred Lautenschlaeger Award for Theological Promise. Hays has published articles on diverse topics in journals such as the Journal of Near Eastern Studies, the Journal of Biblical Literature, Vetus Testamentum, Biblica, Zeitschrift für die Alttestamentliche Wissenschaft, Ugarit-Forschungen, Journal of Ancient Egyptian Interconnections, and the Journal of Theological Interpretation. He has also contributed essays to various edited volumes. Hays teaches courses in Old Testament and directs the master’s program in Ancient Near Eastern Studies in the School of Theology. His languages include Hebrew, Akkadian, Ugaritic, Aramaic, Greek, and Latin. Hays is ordained in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).