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MemberChristoph Lange

…Genealogies and Tribal Histories of Arabian horses – A Comparative Network Analysis of the Transcultural Milieu of Arab and Western breeders, traders and enthusiasts of the Arabian Horse. | Or: Breeding Arabian Horses. Circulation, Certification and Standardization

In the end of the 19th century Euro-American private breeders, traders and enthusiasts of the Arabian horse started establishing a global market through expanding importations of purebred Arabian horses from Egypt, Greater Syria and Northern Arabia to Europe und US. They founded local nat…

I studied from 2004–2011 Social Anthropology and Middle East Studies at the University of Leipzig. With my first travels to Syria, Lebanon and Jordan, I set my research focus on the Levant region within the Arab Middle East. From 2008–2012 I worked for the German state-funded Collaborative Research Center CRC 586 „Difference and Integration“ at the universities of Leipzig and Halle/Lutherstadt Wittenberg where I conducted my first ethnographic research about Bedouin representations in Syrian television dramas and Arab media discourses about authenticity. Since 2014 I am working as a doctoral researcher at the Research Lab “Transformations of Life” at the a.r.t.e.s. Graduate School for the Humanities Cologne. My actual PhD-research project is about the breeding, standardization and circulation of Arabian purebred horses with an ethnographic focus on Egypt and Arab actors within the global breeding industry.

MemberKatrin Boniface

Kat Boniface is a PhD student at the University of California, Riverside, studying horses and horsemanship in early modern Europe. She earned her MA in medieval history, with Distinction, from California State University, Fresno in 2015. Her Master’s thesis was on the social symbolism of the horse, and the disconnect from its practical value that developed in the late middle ages. She graduated from Stony Brook University, in New York, in 2013 with honors in history and a second major in English, both focusing on medieval Europe. She is the founder and current President of the Equine History Collective. Prior to returning to academics, she earned a trade degree in horse training from Meredith Manor International Equestrian Centre, along with a teaching certification, and ran an equine program in Maryland. Current research areas include medieval and early modern equine nutrition, changing definitions of “humane” treatment in animal training, and genetic history. Her dissertation, “Manufacturing the Horse,” examines how the heritability of traits in livestock was understood prior to Mendel and Darwin.

MemberEmma Herbert-Davies

I am currently completing an MA in Medieval Studies at the University of Leeds. My undergraduate dissertation explored how horses were used in manuscript art to reflect the status and gender of their riders. My master’s dissertation carries on the equine theme through a study of violence and injury to horses in medieval tournaments. I will begin my PhD in September and my thesis will be based on researching the equestrian equipment used in tournaments and warfare, with a focus on horse armour. My supervisors will be Dr Alan Murray (University of Leeds) and Dr Karen Watts (Royal Armouries, Leeds). I have ridden, trained and competed horses for most of my life and also have a keen interest in numismatics, having spent much of my undergraduate time cataloging and digitising the University of Leeds coin collections (@winchestercoins).