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MemberJonathan Weiland

Jon’s research uses traditional classics scholarship, bioarchaeology and digital research methods, to investigate the darker aspects of the ancient world, topics like poverty, disease, slavery and violence.  His master’s thesis explored how malaria affected the landscapes of Roman Italy.  His dissertation focuses on the archaeology of what some refer to as the “Invisible Romans,” the people with the lowest socio-economic status in Italy, such as slaves and peasants.  His other projects include developing effective low-cost 3D modeling techniques for documenting archaeological evidence and using GIS to model ancient travel and exchange. Jon has worked for the Midwest Archaeological Center of the National Park Service, the Archaeological Mapping Lab at the University of Pennsylvania’s Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, and in Archaeological Collections at the Arizona State Museum.  He has participated in archaeological investigations in Italy, Greece, Turkey, Egypt, Mexico, Peru, and at several locations in the United States. In his free time Jon enjoys travel, photography, rambling conversation, excessively long walks and binge watching good TV.

MemberLinda R. Gosner

Linda Gosner studies Roman archaeology, art, and social history. Her research centers on local responses to Roman imperialism in rural and industrial landscapes of the western Mediterranean (primarily Spain, Portugal, and Sardinia). In particular, she studies the impact of empire on technology, craft production, labor practices, and everyday life in provincial communities. Linda’s current book project examines the transformation of mining communities and landscapes in the Iberian Peninsula following Roman conquest. Her work engages with broad questions about human-environment interaction, community and identity, labor history, mobility, and culture contact. In addition to her ongoing research in Spain and Portugal, Linda currently co-directs the Sinis Archaeological Project, a landscape survey project in west-central Sardinia, Italy. The project explores the diverse social and environmental factors impacting resource extraction, settlement patterns, and colonial interactions in the 1st millennium BCE through the Roman period. She is also a core collaborator with the Progetto S’Urachi excavations in Sardinia. Previously, Linda has conducted fieldwork—including excavation, pedestrian survey, and ceramic analysis—in Spain, Portugal, Italy, Egypt, Jordan, and Turkey, most recently co-leading a survey at the site of S’Urachi in Sardinia. At Michigan, Linda teaches courses in Classical Art and Archaeology and Classical Civilization. She is also a postdoctoral scholar with the Michigan Society of Fellows and a Research Affiliate with the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology. Linda holds a PhD from the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University. In fall 2020, Linda will join the faculty of Texas Tech University as an Assistant Professor of Classical Archaeology.

MemberSean Burrus

Currently the Bothmer Fellow in Greek and Roman Art at the Metropolitan Museum, my research explores the role that material and visual culture played in the Jewish experience of the late ancient Roman world. I received my B.A. in Ancient Mediterranean Religions from the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill (2008), and went on to study at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem before receiving an M.A. (2012) and Ph.D. (2017) in the History of Judaism from Duke University. I am an experienced instructor in Hebrew Bible and Jewish history from the Israelite period to Late Antiquity with an emphasis on the Greco-Roman World. I also have expertise in material and visual culture, archaeology and anthropology. I have archaeological field experience from important Roman period sites in Israel, and am a member of the publication team for the Duke excavations at Sepphoris. My dissertation research involved several enjoyable summers on site documenting and photographing in Rome and Beth She’arim. Having concluding my current research on Jewish sarcophagus patrons, I have begun work on a monograph more broadly exploring additional media of Jewish visual culture in Late Antiquity as evidence of cultural interaction and change. I am also developing a digital project that seeks to virtually reconstruct and reopen the destroyed Jewish catacombs of Monteverde.

MemberRebecca Kennedy

I work on issues of identity formation processes in Classical Athens and, increasingly, the broader Mediterranean. My primary interests are on imperialism and issues of foreignness, geography, environmental determinism theories and the relationship between such theories and the history of race and ethnicity. I have also published on the intersections of gender, ethnicity, and citizenship in Classical Athens. I run a blog called “Classics at the Intersections” that focuses on issues of race/ethnicity and gender/sexuality in antiquity at their modern receptions. I also maintain there a database of syllabi and modules for teaching race and ethnicity in classical antiquity and a continually growing bibliography on the same subject.

Membertarek farrag

  I read a lot in science books, especially astronomical sciences, anthropology books, novels and poetry books.  I love philosophy; photography books and watching movies which have a universal or human vision.First, I wrote poetry, and published a collection of scattered poems in newspapers and literary magazines in Egypt and the Arab world. Since 2003, she started publishing poetry and novels until the end of this year, “Black Sands”, published by the Egyptian General Book Organization. Translating a number of articles in literature, photography and astronomical sciences in many cultural magazines in the Arab world, including:  El-Rafid Cultural Magazine and Emirates Cultural Magazine issued by the UAE, and published a number of articles translated in the cultural magazine like: Merritt Magazine (Egypt), New Culture magazine (Egypt), El-Jadeed Magazine (London) .. Etc. Participating in many literary conferences inside Egypt including “Writers Conference”, Central Cultural Conference (6 times), The One Day’s Conference (3 times). My translation experience gives me a great motivation to complete what I started in this hard, wonderful and challenging work. I want to do important and comprehensive work at the global and humanitarian levels. For me, translation creates a profound reflection of the universe and its evolution that requires the development of human knowledge. As Stephen Jake Dyck says, broadening the horizons of cultural development to include the global context has many potential benefits. Since biology has benefited from broader cosmic considerations, cultural development can also benefit from thinking in more general theoretical terms about the origin and development of cultures. I very much want to translate an important book that gives us a great opportunity to see, perhaps to realize that human is a complete and independent universe, evolving – man – because the universe is evolving. Man seeks perfection as does the universe. I believe in the words “George Santayana” who wrote in “Theory of Beauty” says: “It seems that what is missing is a continuous life, has no end, and the rigid thing does not know it by virtue of its formation.” I believe that there is a relationship between translation and nostalgia. The colossal epistemic revolution in the world forced languages into rapprochement, one day, someone said that a prominent translator argued that if we only relied on the English language, we would lose the curiosity that was driving Milton and Orwell pushes them forward. Translated articles: Like, The Unwomanly Face of War by Svetlana Alexievich – ‘a monument to courage’ Svetlana Alexievich: ‘Stalin and the Gulag are not history’  – Kazuo Ishiguro, the New Nobel Laureate, By James Wood New Egyptian culture magazine October 2017. Carson McCullers’s Primal Scenes: The Ballad of the Sad Café,by: Doreen Fowler, El-Jadeed Magazine – London 2017. The world will surely end,” Can Lightning Strike the Same Place Twice?” By:  Nora Gonzalez– Emirates Cultural Issue (62) December 2017. This is The Beat Generation, by John Clellon Holmes New Egyptian culture magazine. DEFINING BEAUTY; The Body in ancient Greek art. by Ian Jenkins, Merritt Magazine, Cairo, July 2019 issue. Ugliness Is Underrated: In Defense of Ugly Paintings, by Karl Rosenkranz Al-Faisal Saudi Journal, Issues 511-512 (July August 2019). Multiple Views about Muhammad; The Man and the Prophet, Merritt Cultural Magazine, Issue No. 9, September 2019.  

MemberRoss Wilson

Dr Ross Wilson is a Senior Lecturer in the History department at the University of Chichester. He holds a BA (Hons) in Archaeology, an MA by Research in Archaeology and History (York, 2004) and a PhD in Archaeology and History (York, 2008). His doctoral thesis examined the experience of British soldiers on the Western Front and the representation of this experience within contemporary politics, media and culture. My research background is varied, taking approaches from archaeology, anthropology, literature and sociology to examine aspects of modern history and its representation in the present. I have research interests in modern British history and the history of the United States and I have written widely on issues of conflict, consumerism, identity, enslavement, literature, museums, heritage, urbanism, landscapes and material culture. In 2012, Routledge published my first book, Landscapes of the Western Front: Materiality during the Great War, which provided an anthropologically-informed examination of the British soldiers on the battlefields of France and Flanders during the First World War. This work then developed into an assessment of how the Great War (1914-1918) is valued and used across contemporary British society. This analysis of cultural history and heritage assesses how individuals and communities use the memory of the conflict to understand current political and social contexts. This work, Cultural Heritage of the Great War in Britain, was published by Routledge in July 2013. I continued my examination of the experience of the First World War with the 2014 publication with Routledge, New York and the First World War: shaping an American city. This work examined how the conflict of 1914-1918 had a dramatic effect on the citizens of New York, ensuring that a city of immigrants, which was perceived as a potential threat within the wider United States, was reformed during the war as a metropolis which was dedicated to the principles of the nation. In 2016, I published The Language of the Past with Bloomsbury. This study examined how we use references to the past to establish ideas and values in the present. From dinosaurs, cavemen, Egyptian pharaohs, Roman Emperors, medieval feudalism, Victorian culture and the Wild West, we incorporate the past as a metaphor, allusion or simile to guide us towards the future within contemporary society. I have developed my work within heritage studies and modern history with a book with Routledge in 2017, Natural History: heritage, place and politics. This assessed how the representation of natural history in museums, heritage sites, the media and within popular discourse, can be used to address how we relate to and understand our environment. In conjunction with this research, I have also been involved with the 1807 Commemorated project at the University of York which provided one of the major assessments of the marking of the bicentenary of the abolition of the slave trade in British museums in 2007. This work was published by Routledge in 2011 as Representing Enslavement and Abolition in Museums: Ambiguous Engagements. My current research examines the history and heritage of health and safety, the media representation and memory of the First World War, the history of New York, the role of ‘natural heritage’, digital heritage, memory studies and the role of museums and heritage sites as a mode of social and political reform.

MemberGuy Burneko

Born and raised in central New York State, life/work/school/travel from there to the Bronx to Fairbanks, Bethel and Anchorage, Alaska,  Atlanta, Dalian, China, Asheville, NC, Roanoke, VA, San Francisco, Seattle, Whidbey Island, WA, with sojourns, wanderings and fellowships in several other delightful places….All transdisciplinary, intercultural, hermeneutic and naturalistic in character.

MemberCarly L. Crouch

I am currently David Allan Hubbard Professor of Old Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California, where I teach and research in a number of areas relating to Hebrew Bible/Old Testament and Hebrew language and exegesis. My research focuses on the intersection of theology, ethics, and community identities, with a historical focus on the social and intellectual world of ancient Israel and a contemporary interest in the relevance of this work for twenty-first century ethics. I am especially interested in integrating insights from other disciplines, such as anthropology, refugee studies, and postcolonial theory, into biblical studies. This has led to monographs examining the intersection between creation theology and ethics in the conduct of war (War and Ethics), the social context of Deuteronomy’s distinctively Israelite ethics (The Making of Israel), and the relationship between oaths of loyalty to the Assyrian king and Deuteronomy’s emphasis on exclusive loyalty to God (Israel and the Assyrians), as well as a co-authored volume analysing scribal translation practice in the Iron Age (Translating Empire, with Jeremy M. Hutton). My current project incorporates trauma theory, social-scientific research on involuntary migration, and postcolonial theory to understand the consequences of the Babylonian exile on Israel and Judah, developing previous work on Israelite identity and theology and on the prophets. I also have interests in Genesis, the Psalms, and the prophets. My previous post was at the University of Nottingham (UK), where I directed the Centre for Bible, Ethics and Theology, bringing together biblical and historical scholars with systematic and philosophical theologians to address contemporary issues in theology and religious studies. I have held research fellowships at Keble College and St John’s College in Oxford and at Fitzwilliam College and Gonville and Caius College in Cambridge.