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MemberDylan Kerrigan

I’m a lecturer and researcher in Socio-Cultural Anthropology, Political Sociology, and Criminology at the University of the West Indies, St Augustine Campus. I got my PhD in Anthropology from American University in Washington DC. Did a Masters in Anthropology and Cultural Process at Goldsmiths College, University of London. And I started out with a BA in Social Anthropology from the University of Sussex. From a Caribbean, global South perspective I am most interested in how cultural and economic processes extend over long periods of time in the service of various systems of power. My main areas of focus are: class analysis; class and culture; race, class, and colourism; inequality; social change and the state; spectacle, carnival, and sport; popular culture; social and economic justice; power, elites, and white-collar crime; culture and politics. My dissertation was a social history of race, class and culture in urban Trinidad with a specific focus on Woodbrook, Carnival, and Violence. It provided examples of cultural connections between the different political and economic climates/structures/eras of Colonialism, Post Colonialism and Neo Colonialism in Trinidad. Since then I’ve done research into:

  • ·      Men and masculinities on the small goal football fields of Trinidad
  • ·      Court user experiences of the magistrate and high courts of Trinidad and Tobago
  • ·      Youth experiences of urban violence
  • ·      Therapeutic cultures, positive psychology and transnational self-help
  • ·      The militarisation of everyday life in urban Port of Spain
  • ·      Decision-making amongst government officials
  • ·      Political culture
  • ·      White-collar crime, corruption and bobol
  • ·      The coloniality of power and Justice in the Caribbean
  • ·      Spoken word as a local research methodology
  • ·      Fear of crime and local policing
  • ·      Crime and it’s representation in the anglophone Caribbean
  • ·      Radicalisation and preventing violent extremism

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MemberStephen Hopkins

I work on all things apocrypha in Medieval religious literature, taking a comparative philological approach. My dissertation tracks the transmission of infernal apocrypha (especially the Gospel of Nicodemus and Vision of St. Paul) across Old English, Old Norse, Middle Welsh, and Old/Middle Irish texts and translations. My idea of a good time is scrutinizing vernacular translations of theologically-oriented works, and thinking about the history of emotions and temporality. My favorite sport is etymology. I’m also into Ghost Stories (especially those of M.R. James), Horror, Medievalism (Tolkien and Lewis), and Vikings.

MemberGreg Hollin

My name is Greg Hollin and I’m a Wellcome Research Fellow based in the School of Sociology and Social Policy at The University of Leeds – before this I was a lecturer in social theory at the same school. Before that I was based in the Institute for Science and Society, University of Nottingham. I’m interested in the sociology of science and medicine and my work is largely focused around two areas. Firstly, I’ve studied the role of cognitive psychology and neuroscience in emerging diagnoses. Much of my research here has focused upon autism but my current project (see below) is examining Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) in the context of contact sports. Secondly, I’m interested in new materialism and more-than-human research. I’ve examined these questions in relation to of the consolidation of Beagles as a breed of choice within laboratories but am also working on other cases.

MemberLangdon Elsbree

Aside from essays on Lawrence, Woolf, Hardy, Austen, Frost, and Golding,I Have been writing about the relationship between ritual and story. Two books of mine –The Rituals of Life and Ritual Passage and Narrative Structures–explore some of the relationships, especially liminality ( RP AND NS) Now retired, I still read (casually) in anthropology and try to keep up with such topics as liminality and rites of passage and the ways they inform novels and short stories, as wells as poetry occasionally.

MemberZachary Smith

Zach is a PhD student and graduate teaching associate in Sport Studies at the University of Tennessee. Before Tennessee, he completed an MA in Comparative Religion at Western Michigan University. His academic interests revolve primarily around religion and physical cultures in the US, and he is a research assistant at the Center for the Study of Sport and Religion at the University of Tennessee. His dissertation is an ethnographic study of Christian mixed martial arts.