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MemberLiberty Stanavage

…sh Drama: Domesticating Vengeance, 1566-1700.”  (Monograph under consideration). “Margaret of Anjou and the Rhetoric of Sovereign Vengeance.”  (Essay for collection on Shakespeare’s Queens …

I work across what I like to jokingly refer to as “the long English Renaissance,” as I have projects that span from the late Medieval to the Restoration, as well as sideline interests in science fiction and Ecocriticism. I primarily deal with drama, although that includes attention to the physical codex, the text itself, and the text in performance. My current research interests include: gender, revenge, and the passions in early modern England; medieval ideas of/around dramatic manuscripts; ballad publics and anti-publics; and the social function of revenge drama.

MemberNicholas Ealy

… myth of Narcissus including the Lay of Narcissus, Alain de Lille’s Plaint of Nature, René d’Anjou’s Love-Smitten Heart, Chrétien de Troyes’s Story of the Grail and Guillaume de Machaut…

I specialize in the medieval literature and culture of Iberia and France and teach courses on literature, literature and psychology, Mediterranean studies, Western humanities, Classical Greece, and the French language. My research is primarily focused on Ovidian narcissism in erotic and spiritual literature from the 12th to the 15th century. Other scholarly interests include psychoanalytic studies and cinema studies.

MemberMarilyn Kelly-Buccellati

…6. “26. Tell Mozan/Urkesh (Hassake).” In A History of Syria in One Hundred Sites, edited by Y. Kanjou and A. Tsuneki, 111–14. Oxford: Archaeopress Publishing LTD. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figs…

Professor Marilyn Kelly-Buccellati has been excavating and conducting research on the archaeology and art history of the ancient Near East for over 50 years. Her Ph.D. from the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago was on the third millennium B.C. in the Caucasus. She taught archaeology and art history in California State University, Los Angeles and is now Visiting Professor at the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, UCLA. She is Director of the Urkesh/Mozan Archaeological Project, a site spanning the fourth to the second millennia BC which has provided crucial to our understanding of the history, art and architecture of northern Mesopotamia. Her research interests include Syro-Mesopotamian seal iconography, ceramics, ancient identification markers, pre-history in the southern Caucasus. She has published many site reports based on work in Terqa and especially Mozan/Urkesh, and is currently finishing a digital volume on the excavated ceramics from Urkesh, to be published within the Urkesh Global Record website. One of her important publications was on the function of the necromantic pit excavated in Urkesh, unique in its monumentality and significance; her research on the seal impressions of the AP Palace has brought to light the artistic value of these objects as well as the complex royal court to which they give witness. With the cessation of excavations in Syria due to the war she has returned to the Republic of Georgia to work with the Italian team from the Ca’ Foscari University, Venice. This fieldwork activity lead her to curate an exhibit entitled “Georgia Paese d’oro e di fede. Identita e alterita nella storia di un popolo” on the archaeological and artistic heritage of the Republic of Georgia. Marilyn Kelly-Buccellati has worked for many years in the Near East, especially in Syria, Iraq and Turkey. She and her husband, Giorgio Buccellati, are at present co-directors of the archaeological expedition to Tell Mozan/Urkesh in North-Eastern Syria. They work closely together both in the field and on the publication reports from their excavations, of which five volumes, plus audio-visual presentations, have appeared so far. They lead an international staff comprising colleagues and students from the US, Europe, the Near East and Asia and have given joint lectures on the excavations, and workshops on methods used, at major archaeological centers around the world as well as holding positions as visiting professors in various European universities.

MemberGiorgio Buccellati

…6. “26. Tell Mozan/Urkesh (Hassake).” In A History of Syria in One Hundred Sites, edited by Y. Kanjou and A. Tsuneki, 111–14. Oxford: Archaeopress Publishing LTD. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figs…

Giorgio Buccellati studied at the Catholic University (Milan, Italy), Fordam University and received his Ph.D. from the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago. He is Research Professor in the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology at UCLA, and Professor Emeritus in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures and in the Department of History at UCLA. He founded the Institute of Archaeology at UCLA, of which he served as first director from 1973 until 1983 and where he is now Director of the Mesopotamian Lab. He is currently the Co-Director of the Urkesh/Mozan Archaeological Project as well as Director of IIMAS – The International Institute for Mesopotamian Area Studies and Director of AVASA – Associazione per la Valorizzazione dell’Archeologia e della Storia Antica. His research interests include the ancient languages, the literature, the religion, the archaeology and the history of Mesopotamia, as well as the theory of archaeology. His publications include site reports, text editions, linguistic and literary studies as well as on archaeological theory, historical monographs and essays on philosophy and spirituality. He has published a structural grammar of ancient Babylonian, two volumes on Mesopotamian civilization (on religion and politics; two more are forthcoming on literature as well as on art and architecture), a volume on archaeological theory dealing with the structural, digital and philosophical aspects of the archaeological record. He has authored two major scholarly websites on the archaeology of Urkesh and on archaeological theory. As a Guggenheim Fellow, he has traveled to Syria to study modern ethnography and geography for a better understanding of the history of the ancient Amorites. In his field work, he has developed new approaches to the preservation and presentation of archaeological sites and to community archaeology. He has spearheaded the Urkesh Extended Project, responding to the crisis of the war in Syria by maintaining a very active presence at the site. Giorgio Buccellati has worked for many years in the Near East, especially in Syria, Iraq and Turkey. Together with his wife, Marilyn Kelly-Buccellati, he is co-director of the archaeological expedition to Tell Mozan/Urkesh in North-Eastern Syria. They work closely together both in the field and on the publication reports from their excavations, of which five volumes, plus audio-visual presentations, have appeared so far. They lead an international staff comprising colleagues and students from the US, Europe, the Near East and Asia and have given joint lectures on the excavations, and workshops on methods used, at major archaeological centers around the world as well as holding positions as visiting professors in various European universities.