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DepositThe Centrality of Aleppo and its Environs

This study analyses the relationship between Aleppo and settlements in the city’s hinterland based on spatial statistics. A theoretical extension of the term central place is used in reconstructing Aleppo’s central character. Locally the city served as a centre for trade, exchange, and cult activity. In a regional and supra-regional context, advantages deriving from the topographic location led trade, exchange, and craft to take on different functions. This study demonstrates that, in contrast to other important cities in the ancient Middle East, Aleppo could maintain its long-lasting significance as a central place due to the combination of different functions.

MemberAnnelies Cazemier

I am an ancient historian with a particular interest in the Greek world, Hellenistic history, and religion, as well as Greek history during the Roman period. Teaching in a History department at Southampton, I am also increasingly fascinated by the reception of the Greek world in later periods of history. My forthcoming book on Greek Sanctuaries and the Rise of Rome explores the spread of Roman power as seen from religious sites in Greece, the Aegean, and Asia Minor (from the third until the early first century BCE). It brings out the key role of cults and sanctuaries in early exchanges between Greeks, Romans, and Hellenistic rulers – in war, diplomacy, and trade. As part of my work for the Copenhagen Associations Project, I undertook research on ancient Greek associations, carrying out surveys and detailed studies of epigraphic evidence (esp. from the Aegean), and analysing religious aspects, foreign involvement, and relations with Rome. My ongoing research interests include the local histories and wider connections of islands in the Aegean from the fifth century BCE, through the Hellenistic age, into the Roman Imperial period; Greek sanctuaries and their networks; and travel and mobility in the ancient world.

DepositApplying Linked Open Data: Refining a Model of Data Sharing as Publication

Twenty-first century humanistic research has unprecedented opportunities to advance new models of scholarly communication together with new data-driven avenues of investigation. This project will help establish “data sharing as publication” as a scalable and professionally-valued model for the dissemination of humanistic research data. The project will develop case studies involving cross-collections research on trade and exchange in the Ancient Near East and East Mediterranean. In developing publishing workflows toward Linked Open Data, the project will help align the needs of the research profession with rapidly expanding capabilities of the Web of Data.

MemberSarah Bond

I am an Associate Professor in the Classics Department at the University of Iowa. I am interested in Roman, late antique, and early medieval history, archaeology, topography and GIS, Digital Humanities, and the role of Classics in pop culture (e.g., Game of Thrones). I obtained a BA in Classics and History with a minor in Classical Archaeology from the University of Virginia (2005). My PhD is in Ancient History from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2011). My book, Trade and Taboo: Disreputable Professionals in the Roman Mediterranean, was published with the University of Michigan Press (October, 2016) and looks at the lives of marginalized tradesmen like gravediggers and tanners. Follow me on Twitter @SarahEBond, read my Blog, or email me at sarah-bond@uiowa.edu .

MemberIoannis Georganas

Ioannis Georganas is Academic Director and Lecturer at Hellenic International Studies in the Arts. He holds an MA (1998) and a PhD (2003) in Archaeology from the University of Nottingham, and has worked for the British School at Athens, the Foundation of the Hellenic World, Lake Forest College, and the University of St Andrews. His research interests include the study of Early Iron Age burial customs and the construction of identities in Greece, as well as weapons and warfare in the Late Bronze and Early Iron Age Aegean. Ioannis has participated in excavations and field surveys in Greece (Kouphovouno, Lefkandi, Kastro-Kallithea, Praisos, Kenchreai) and Bulgaria (Halka Bunar). He served as President of the Athens-Greece Society of the Archaeological Institute of America (2005-2017) and he’s been Secretary of the Society of Ancient Military Historians (2013-present).

MemberCillian O'Hogan

I am an Assistant Professor of Medieval Latin at the Centre for Medieval Studies in the University of Toronto. My main focus is on late antique and early medieval Latin literature, and on the history of the book between c. 300 and 800 CE. Previously, I was a visiting assistant professor in the Department of Classical, Near Eastern, and Religious Studies at UBC, a post-doc in the Department of Classical Studies at the University of Waterloo, and a curator in the Ancient, Medieval, and Early Modern Manuscripts section of the British Library. I received my Ph.D in Classics from the University of Toronto, where I wrote a dissertation entitled “Geography and space in the poetry of Prudentius”. Before that, I studied for my undergraduate degree at Trinity College Dublin.

MemberJonathan Schmidt-Swartz

I am a doctoral candidate in the Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies at New York University focusing on Hebrew Bible and the Ancient Near East. My primary research interests and dissertation focus broadly on the intersection of ancient scribal culture, critical theory, and kingship. More specifically, my dissertation aims to trace the intellectual history and historiography of kingship found within the Hebrew Bible in more concrete terms, namely, by considering how scribes (re)interpreted sources they inherited.