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MemberGlen M Golub

This work reconstructs the lives of Europeans 40 000 years ago through four nonverbal languages found in Grotte Chauvet, Grotte Lascaux, and rock art around the world.  The entirety of both caves are translated here for the first time.  The cultures are understood through the Art, Astronomy, Religion, and Ritual depicted in the caves.  The Index provides a handy field guide to understanding Rock Art worldwide. For those who enjoy Art History, Ancient Religion, Mysticism, Archeology, Greek Classical Literature or Mythology, Ancient History, Languages or Linguistics, Womens Studies, or Human Migration

MemberVictoria Leonard

Victoria Leonard is a postdoctoral researcher in late ancient history, as part of the ERC-funded project ‘Connected Clerics. Building a Universal Church in the Late Antique West (380-604 CE)’, at Royal Holloway, University London and the Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities (ACDH-ÖAW), Austrian Academy of Sciences (Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften). Victoria’s role within the project involves compiling data on clerical connections and using adapted digital tools to examine and visualize evolving clerical networks in the late ancient and early medieval western Mediterranean. Victoria’s research focuses on four main areas: i) social network analysis and digital humanities; ii) ancient and early medieval historiography; iii) ancient religion, particularly conflict and coercion; iv) and gender, sexuality, violence, and theories of the body in antiquity. Her monograph, In Defiance of History: Orosius and the Unimproved Past, is under contract with Routledge. The work explores Paulus Orosius’s historiographical approach to the deconstruction and reconstruction of a narrative of the past through the prism of Christianity. Victoria has published articles in Vigiliae Christianae, Studies in Late Antiquity and forthcoming in Gender and History. Victoria is also a Research Associate at the Institute of Classical Studies, School of Advanced Study, University of London. She is a founding member, former co-chair, and steering committee member of the Women’s Classical Committee (UK). She teaches across the disciplines of ancient history, archaeology, and religious studies. She has convened modules in material approaches to the ancient world and ancient religion, and has held teaching positions at Bristol and Cardiff universities.

MemberPatricia Robin Woodruff

Patricia “Robin” Woodruff is a polymath, author, artist and Priestess of Stone Circle Wicca. Her Lemko heritage from the remote Carpathian mountains started her on a path of intense study of Slavic Paganism and magic. Woodruff has been immersed for the past year writing the Roots of Slavic Magic. Having read over 2,000 sources on the subject, Woodruff can provide new insights into this ancient religion based on recent archeological discoveries, newly-revealed rituals, and revised scholarly analysis of petroglyphs from the areas influencing the proto-Slavs.

MemberLynn Huber

…013.
“Like a Bride Adorned”:  Reading Metaphor in John’s Apocalypse.  New York:  T and T Clark, 2007.
Essays and Articles
“Making Men in Revelation 2-3: Reading the Seven Messages in the Bath-Gymnasiums of Asia Minor” in Stones, Bones and the Sacred: Essays from the Colloquia on Material Culture and Ancient Religion in Honor of Dennis E. Smith. Edited by Alan Cadwallader. Atlanta, GA: Society of Biblical Literature, 2016.
“Same-sex Relations: New Testament” in The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Gender Studies. Edited by Julia M. O’Brien. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014. 274-280.
“Satan.”…

New Testament Studies/ Revelation, Ancient Mediterranean Religions, Early Christian History, Apocalypticism

MemberChristy Cobb

Christy Cobb is Assistant Professor of Religion at Wingate University in North Carolina. She holds a PhD in Biblical Studies from Drew University where she focused on New Testament and Early Christianity and received a certificate in Women and Gender studies. Her first book, Slavery, Gender, Truth, and Power in Luke-Acts and Other Ancient Narratives is forthcoming with Palgrave MacMillan and will be out in the spring of 2019. In addition to serving as the co-chair of the steering committee of the Ancient Fiction section of the Society of Biblical Literature, Cobb is a member of the editorial board for the Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion. She has published articles in Biblical Interpretation and Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion as well as reviews for The Bible & Critical Theory and Review of Biblical Literature. She has also served as a contributor for Ancient Jew Review and Feminist Studies in Religion Blog.

MemberMatt Chalmers

I am currently Visiting Assistant Professor of Religion at Washington and Lee University. I specialize in questions of identity, representation of difference, and contesting shared pasts, between Jews, Christians, and Samaritans in antiquity. My research work uses late ancient identity and self-fashioning as a laboratory space for the critical approaches of the scholar of religion, as well as exploring the resonance of ancient self-fashioning in scholarship and intellectual history after antiquity.

MemberPatrick McCullough

I currently serve as an Upper School History Teacher at Harvard-Westlake School in Los Angeles (US History; The World and Europe). In the classroom, I guide students as they further embrace their own analytical voices on difficult topics with confidence and clarity. I have broad teaching expertise that spans history, religion, and literature from the ancient world to the present. In my classes, I help students make creative connections between the ancient and modern; between dense theoretical materials and popular culture. In their evaluations, my students often note how much they appreciate an instructor who pushes the boundaries of their analytical abilities but also meets them where they are. I earned a Ph.D. in History of Religion, Early Christianity, at UCLA, where I also served as a regular Teaching Fellow. In my academic work, I examine representations of ideologies and identities in ancient Jewish and Christian texts and their modern interpreters. My work problematizes the modern categories we deploy in our discussions of antiquity and religion. My dissertation, “Apocalypse and Difference: Rereading Cultural Boundaries in Early Christian Texts,” explores how apocalyptic discourse in early Christian texts maintains group boundaries as their Christ-confessing authors simultaneously participate in the discursive practices of their ancient Mediterranean society and culture.