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MemberMagnus Møller Ziegler

I am 29 years old and from Copenhagen, Denmark. Currently, I am employed as a Ph.D. Fellow in the Department of Philosophy and the History of Ideas, School of Culture and Society, Aarhus University (Denmark). I work with German philosophy in the 19th century and more specifically the reception of Hegel, especially the Young Hegelians, but also the political and institutional reception of Hegel in a socio-economic and political context. Areas of specialisation G. W. F. Hegel, Hegelianism, and the contemporary reception of Hegel; German Idealism; Karl Marx; Friedrich Engels; the intellectual history of Marxism, circa 1850-1970. Areas of competence/interest Philosophy of science, especially the social sciences; philosophy of history and history of philosophy; German 19th century philosophy in general; the Frankfurt School (1st generation) and Critical Theory; ancient philosophy, mainly Aristotle; “classical” political philosophy (from Plato to Marx); the institutionalisation of systems of thought; digital humanities and text-as-data methods for political theory and philosophy research.

MemberSarah Ruth Jansen

…and Censorship in Plato’s Republic: The Problem of the Irrational Part,” Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy, Vol. 19, No. 2, pp. 205-215

2014

“Review of Plato on Art and Beauty by A.E. Denham (ed.),” The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, Vol. 72, No. 1, pp. 104-106.

2013

“Plato’s Phaedo as a Pedagogical Drama,” Ancient Philosophy, Vol. 33, No. 2 , pp. 333-352

ACCEPTED WITH REVISIONS

“Plato on Laughing at People,” Ancient Philosophy

Translation/commentary of chapters 14-15 of Aristotle’s “On the Progression of Animals,” contribution to an English translation/commentary edited by Andrea Falcon (Cambridge University Press)

 

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My ancient Greek philosophy scholarship explores the intersection of ethics, art and emotion; the dramatic and educational aspects of Plato’s dialogues; and ‘purpose’ or ‘telos’ in nature (teleology). I have also written a memoir about bikepacking the Arizona Trail from Mexico to Utah.

MemberA.G. Holdier

I am a master’s student in the Philosophy department of the University of Arkansas. My current research focuses on the semantics/pragmatics divide and other issues in the philosophy of language (including contextualism, deixis, and the meaning of gestures). I am also a graduate candidate in the Office of Sustainability’s certificate program exploring the relationship between green business practices and animal ethics. Additional interests include embodiment’s implications for moral psychology, axiological grounding and its relationship to political ecology, various issues in the philosophy of religion (atheological arguments, philosophical eschatology, theological aesthetics), and Ancient Greek philosophy (specifically, Plato).

MemberNicholas Perez

Currently an independent research focusing on religion, philosophy, and history who is hoping to attend the University of Louisville for the PhD in Humanities program.  Planned research is over Teresa of Avila’s epistemology of the body. Research interests include Virgin Mary, primarily theological conceptions conerning her and cultural reception of her; theology and history of Christianity (primary periods ancient, medieval, and postmodern), particular focus on concepts of salvation, the Eucharist, gender, and the body; female Christian mystics, primarily Catherine of Siena and Teresa of Avila; Biblical exegesis, translation, and literary analysis; connections between literature and religion; philosophy of Plato, Augustine, Aquinas, Nietzsche, Freud, Heideggar, Bataille, Beauvoir, Kirsteva, and Irigaray (primary philosophic interest is existential phenomenology).

GroupDR2 – Distant Reading in the History of Philosophy

In the last twenty years Franco Moretti’s ‘distant reading’ approach has provided a fresh under­standing of literature and its historical development not by studying in detail a few particular texts (as in the so-called ‘close reading’), but rather by aggregating and analyzing large amounts of information. The central role of data in this approach is […]

DepositCultivating Communities of Learning with Digital Media

Digital media technology, when deployed in ways that cultivate shared learning communities in which students and teachers are empowered to participate as partners in conjoint educational practices, can transform the way we teach and learn philosophy. This essay offers a model for how to put blogging and podcasting in the service of a cooperative approach to education that empowers students to take ownership of their education and enables teachers to cultivate in themselves and their students the excellences of dialogue. The essay is organized around a compelling story of how the students in an Ancient Greek Philosophy course responded to an anonymous, belligerent commenter on the blog from outside of the class. The incident brings the pedagogy of cooperative education into sharp relief.

MemberJames South

My primary areas of research are Augustine, Late Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy, Ordinary Language Philosophy (especially the thought of Stanley Cavell), and Philosophy and Popular Culture. Much of my research to date in the history of philosophy has focused on issues associated with questions about cognition in later medieval philosophy, for example, intentionality, sensation and knowledge of the singular. The reason for this focus is my suspicion that the precise contours of Descartes’ indebtedness to Late Scholastic thought are still not well understood due to a failure to appreciate some distinctive turns made in discussions concerning the intellect in the 15th and 16th centuries. My writing on popular culture–tv shows, music, comic books, etc.–allows me to explore some interests I have in contemporary philosophy, including the social context in which philosophy finds itself. Recent published work includes an essay on Zabarella and regressus theory (in the Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal), an essay on comic book heroes and modernity in a volume of essays edited by William Irwin and Jorge Gracia, an essay on the Beatles and the practice of philosophy, an essay on Veronica Mars and Skepticism, and the volumes James Bond and Philosophy (co-edited with Jacob M. Held), Buffy Goes Dark (co-edited with Lynn Edwards and Elizabeth Rambo) and Mad Men and Philosophy (co-edited with Rod Carveth). My most recent published work, with Jacob M. Held is a co-edited book entitled Philosophy and Terry Pratchett for Palgrave-Macmillan. I sometimes blog at andphilosophy.com. For the last eleven years, I have edited the journal Philosophy and Theology. I have also begun coursework as an Academic Candidate at the Michigan Psychoanalytic Institute. You can find more information about my publications at my bepress.com site. I regularly teach undergraduate courses in Social and Political Philosophy. My interests there are directed at the development of the modern tradition of political thought from Machiavelli to Mill and the criticism of that tradition begun by Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, and others. I also regularly teach a course on the history and philosophy of crime and punishment. I have recently developed several new courses. One, “Philosophy and Popular Culture,” explores several philosophical issues associated with popular culture, while also looking closely at various ways of thinking about the discipline of philosophy. Another, “Philosophy and Film,” takes as its central text Stanley Cavell’s Cities of Words. Another, “Conceiving the Subject,” look at various texts from 20th century literature and thought to see how we can best approach the vexed question of the notion of ‘the subject.’ I am especially concerned in this course with making problematic the notion of ‘authenticity’ by focusing on several challenges stemming from the work of Freud, Wittgenstein, Adorno, and others. On the graduate level, I often teach a Plato course, specialized courses on Augustine, Late Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy (“Franciscan Philosophy,” “Humanism and Platonism in the Renaissance”), and a course on Marx and Moral Theory. Most recently, I developed a course on the thought of Cora Diamond and Stanley Cavell. For many years I taught a freshman seminar in the honors program on the work of Joss Whedon.