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MemberJody Gordon

Jody Michael Gordon is an Associate Professor of Humanities and Social Sciences at Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston and an Assistant Director of the Athienou Archaeological Project (AAP). He received his Ph.D. in Classical Archaeology from the Department of Classics at the University of Cincinnati, where his dissertation involved an archaeological study of the effects of imperialism on local identities in Cyprus during the Hellenistic and Roman periods. In addition to working in Cyprus, Jody has excavated in Tunisia, Italy, Spain, and Greece, and his research interests include Roman archaeology, cultural identity, ancient imperialism, and computer applications in archaeology. See here for more on Jody’s teaching at Wentworth Institute of Technology.

MemberAaron L. Beek

Aaron L. Beek is a philologist and historian with two primary research areas: ancient banditry/piracy and ancient North Africa.  More broadly, he works on a swath of Middle Republic and Hellenistic events, particularly as told and remembered by imperial-era writers centuries later.  Other research interests include Plautus, Latin Patristics (especially Tertullian), and Latin epigraphy (particularly epigraphy in North Africa). He has also worked on history pedagogy, digital humanities, and text analysis.

MemberAnnelies Cazemier

I am an ancient historian with a particular interest in the Greek world, Hellenistic history, and religion, as well as Greek history during the Roman period. Teaching in a History department at Southampton, I am also increasingly fascinated by the reception of the Greek world in later periods of history. My forthcoming book on Greek Sanctuaries and the Rise of Rome explores the spread of Roman power as seen from religious sites in Greece, the Aegean, and Asia Minor (from the third until the early first century BCE). It brings out the key role of cults and sanctuaries in early exchanges between Greeks, Romans, and Hellenistic rulers – in war, diplomacy, and trade. As part of my work for the Copenhagen Associations Project, I undertook research on ancient Greek associations, carrying out surveys and detailed studies of epigraphic evidence (esp. from the Aegean), and analysing religious aspects, foreign involvement, and relations with Rome. My ongoing research interests include the local histories and wider connections of islands in the Aegean from the fifth century BCE, through the Hellenistic age, into the Roman Imperial period; Greek sanctuaries and their networks; and travel and mobility in the ancient world.

MemberCatherine Bonesho

I am currently the Assistant Professor of Early Judaism in the Near Eastern Languages and Cultures department at the University of California-Los Angeles. My primary research interests are in the Early Judaism, rabbinic literature, the Roman Near East. Specifically, I am interested in the ways ancient Jews navigated living under imperial domination through the development of legislation and rhetoric about the Other. I am currently working on my first monograph, The Festivals of the Gentiles in Early Judaism. My research also concentrates on the Roman Near East and Semitic languages, especially Aramaic, and their use in imperial contexts. In particular, I investigate the material presentation of Aramaic inscriptions found throughout the Roman Empire. I have authored translation and paleographic articles on Palmyrene Aramaic inscriptions as one of the founding members of the Wisconsin Palmyrene Aramaic Inscription Project in journals including Maarav and KUSATU. I spent the 2017-2018 academic year in Rome as a Rome Prize Fellow in Ancient Studies at the American Academy in Rome (FAAR ‘18). I earned my PhD in Classical and Ancient Near Eastern Studies (2018) and my MA in Hebrew and Semitic Studies (2014) from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

MemberHenry Colburn

My research focuses on the art and archaeology of ancient Iran, and on the regions of the Near East, Eastern Mediterranean, and Central Asia that interacted with Iran prior to the advent of Islam. I am especially interested in reconstructing the social, cultural, political and even economic environments in which objects were created. I am also interested in how our modern knowledge of the ancient world was created, since this affects how we interpret objects and the conclusions we draw about the people who made them. I have held fellowships at the Harvard Art Museums and the Getty Research Institute, and teaching positions at the University of California, Irvine and the University of Southern California. I am now the Andrew W. Mellon Curatorial Fellow in Ancient Near Eastern Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

MemberRyleigh Adams

I am a PhD Candidate in Classics at the University of Tasmania studying Roman provincial management. I finished my Bachelor of Arts in 2015, graduating with a double major in Classics and History, and a minor in English. In 2016, I completed my Honours thesis “Cicero and the Governors: Perceptions of Provincial Management in the Late Republic” and was awarded First Class Honours. My research interests include Roman Imperialism, Roman provincial management, and social history. I am particularly interested in uncovering the perspective of provincials brought under Roman rule in the chaotic, civil war-stricken period of the Late Republic. Outside of my university, I am the President and Managing Editor of Amphora, an open-access, peer-reviewed Ancient World journal. Amphora welcomes contributions from researchers in a diverse range of fields: Classical Studies, Ancient History, Reception Studies, Digital Humanities, Egyptology, and Archaeology just to name a few. The journal is run by an editorial collective drawn from across Australia and New Zealand, and all articles submitted undergo a rigorous peer-review process.