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DepositLinking Letters: Translating Ancient History into Medieval Romance

In his prologue to the late fourteenth-century romance, the Destruction of Troy, John Clerk of Whalley negotiates between his roles as translator, historian and alliterative poet to introduce his account of the fall of Troy for medieval English readers. Professing to tell the true story of Britain’s ancient ancestors, he invokes the fiction of translatio imperii, in which the power of empire passes from Troy to Rome to Britain. According to Clerk, his translation of Guido delle Colonne’s Historia destructionis Troiae provides vernacular readers access to historical truth that had not previously been available to them. Clerk’s assumption of Guido’s history separates his romance from the historiographic tradition of the vastly influential Geoffrey of Monmouth, whose Historia regum Britannie celebrates Britain’s Trojan ancestry and promises future glory to the Britons. Rather than venerate Troy as a font of imperial power, Guido condemns the martial policy of the Trojans that causes their defeat, characterizing Troy as a tainted origin of Western civilization. By comparing Clerk’s text with another translation of Guido’s Historia, John Lydgate’s Troy Book, I argue that Clerk’s translational method, which he calls a ‘linking of letters’, reflects a commitment to connecting a destructive past with an English present.

MemberTimothy Luckritz Marquis

Pedagogy, communication, mobility I work in faculty development and instructional design with an emphasis on online and hybrid teaching and learning and intercultural engagement. I also teach Religious Studies, Christian origins, and ancient history. My research and writing explore ancient and modern itinerancy, ancient ethnicity and modern race, gender studies, and biopolitics.

MemberManuel Ramírez-Sánchez

Associate Professor of Historiographic Sciences and Technics in the Department of Historical Sciences of the University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Canary Islands, Spain). BA, Geography and History, University of La Laguna (1989). MA, Ancient History, University of Salamanca (1991). PhD, History, University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (1999). Faculty member of the Research Institute of Textual Analysis and Applications (IATEXT), of the University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria.

MemberYvonne Seale

…Ph.D., History, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, 2016.

M.Litt., Mediæval History, University of St Andrews, Scotland, 2008.

B.A. (Hons.), History with Ancient History and Archaeology, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, 2006….

I am an Assistant Professor in the History Department of the State University of New York-Geneseo, where I teach courses with a focus on medieval history, women’s history, and the digital humanities. I earned my BA in History, Ancient History and Archaeology from Trinity College Dublin, and my MLitt in Mediaeval History from the University of St Andrews. I obtained my PhD in History from The University of Iowa in 2016. Follow me on Twitter at @yvonneseale or email me at seale@geneseo.edu.

MemberEmma Dwyer

…Hon. Research Fellow, School of Archaeology & Ancient History, University of Leicester

Hon. Secretary of the Society for Post-Medieval Archaeology

Full Member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists (MCIfA)

Associate Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (AFHEA)

Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London (FSA), member of the Society for Historical Archaeology, and Oral History Society….

I develop research projects and studentships with collaborative partners in Higher Education and the wider archaeology sector for MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology), the only archaeology unit that is a UKRI Independent Research Organisation. I was previously Business Development Executive (Heritage) at the University of Leicester, developing collaborative research, consultancy, CPD (Continuing Professional Development) and contract research projects between organisations in the heritage sector and academic staff in the Schools of Archaeology & Ancient History, History, Arts, and Museum Studies. These knowledge exchange activities ensure that teaching and research into heritage and the historic environment continues to inform, and be informed by, professional practice. I undertook my PhD at Leicester’s Centre for Historical Archaeology, in the School of Archaeology & Ancient History, where I contributed to undergraduate and postgraduate teaching in Historical Archaeology. Before coming to Leicester I was Senior Archaeologist in the Built Heritage department at MOLA and previously worked for archaeology units across Britain. I am a full Member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists (MCIfA), Associate Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (AFHEA) and Hon. Secretary of the Society for Post-Medieval Archaeology.

MemberGlen M Golub

This work reconstructs the lives of Europeans 40 000 years ago through four nonverbal languages found in Grotte Chauvet, Grotte Lascaux, and rock art around the world.  The entirety of both caves are translated here for the first time.  The cultures are understood through the Art, Astronomy, Religion, and Ritual depicted in the caves.  The Index provides a handy field guide to understanding Rock Art worldwide. For those who enjoy Art History, Ancient Religion, Mysticism, Archeology, Greek Classical Literature or Mythology, Ancient History, Languages or Linguistics, Womens Studies, or Human Migration

MemberCarl R. Rice

…Ph.D. Candidate, Ancient History…
…B.A. in History, summa cum laude West Virginia University, 2013

B.A. in Religious Studies, summa cum laude, West Virginia University, 2013

M.A. in History, awarded with distinction, North Carolina State University, 2016

Ph.D. in Ancient History, Yale University, in progress (anticipated 2022)…

I am a doctoral candidate in Yale University’s combined program in ancient history. I first graduated from West Virginia University in 2013 with two bachelor’s degrees (history and religious studies), then from North Carolina State University in 2016 with a master’s degree in history.   My dissertation project, titled “Religio Licita: Empire, Religion, and Civic Subject, 250-450 CE,” explores the question of normative religion and its role in shaping the subjects of empire in the third, fourth, and fifth centuries. Drawing on an array of primary sources (including historiography, oratory, legal texts, numismatics, and material culture), I argue that the late Roman state became increasingly concerned with policing the boundaries of permissible religio and employed a variety of coercive strategies to enforce conformity. My dissertation project examines the development and articulation of this normative discourse and its consequences for the empire’s subjects.   In addition, I am interested in gender and sexuality studies in the Roman and late Roman worlds, social and cultural histories of antiquity more broadly, and exploring various critical approaches to ‘doing’ ancient history. I also enjoy thinking about various strategies for teaching the ancient world in a modern university classroom.   Please feel free to write me at carl.rice@yale.edu.

DepositCoptic SCRIPTORIUM: Digitizing a Corpus for Interdisciplinary Research in Ancient Egyptian

Coptic, having evolved from the language of the hieroglyphs of the pharaonic era, represents the last phase of the Egyptian language and is pivotal for a wide range of disciplines, such as linguistics, biblical studies, the history of Christianity, Egyptology, and ancient history. The Coptic language has proven essential for the decipherment and continued study of Ancient Egyptian and is of major interest for Afro-Asiatic linguistics and Coptic linguistics in its own right. Coptic manuscripts are sources for biblical and extra-biblical texts and document ancient and Christian history. Coptic SCRIPTORIUM will advance knowledge in these fields by increasing access to now largely inaccessible texts of historical, religious, and linguistic significance. The project designs digital tools and methodologies and applies them to literary texts, creating a rich open-access corpus.