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MemberHamish Cameron

…d Topographical Guide to the Geography of Strabo” (Oct 2018) Bryn Mawr Classical Review.

“Cameron on Barker, Bouzarovski, Pelling, and Isaksen, eds., New Worlds from Old Texts: Revisiting Ancient Space and Place.” New England Classical Journal 44.3 (2017)

“Cameron on Bianchetti, Cataudella and Gehrke, Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography” Classical Review 67.2 (2017).

“Cameron on Greg Fisher (ed.), Arabs and Empires before Islam” (August 2016) Bryn Mawr Classical Review.

“Cameron on Howe, Garvin and Wrightson, Greece, Macedon and Persia” (April 2016) Classical Journal Online.

Workshops, Roundtables, Seminars, Professional Development …

In keeping with his research and teaching interests, Hamish Cameron is an itinerant historian hailing from a far-flung colony of a former empire. Thematically, he studies movement, borderlands, networks, geography and imperialism. Geographically, he explores the Eastern Mediterranean, Southwest Asia/the Near East and Rome. Chronologically, he investigates the Hellenistic and Roman periods. Philologically, he enjoys cultural allusions and tricola. No, tetracola… Wait, I’ll come in again… Hamish received his PhD in Classics from the University of Southern California in 2014 where he wrote a dissertation examining the representation of “Mesopotamia” as a borderland in Imperial Roman geographic writing of the first four centuries CE. His monograph on the subject has now been published: Making Mesopotamia: Geography and Empire in a Romano-Iranian Borderland (Brill 2019). He received his MA from the University of Canterbury, New Zealand in 2006 with a thesis on the arrival of Roman power in Cilicia. He also holds a Graduate Certificate in Geographic Information Science and Technology (2011) from the USC Spatial Sciences Institute. He has participated in two survey seasons in Greece and in specialist conferences on digital geography, borderlands, networks, religion, and Cilicia. Hamish has taught classes in History and Classical Languages dealing with topics from the Bronze Age to the Information Age. He is interested in the applied methodologies of digital humanities, especially digital geography, the digital dissemination of academic information, and the pedagogy of tabletop games. He also designs boardgames and roleplaying games.

MemberManuel Ramírez-Sánchez

Associate Professor of Historiographic Sciences and Technics in the Department of Historical Sciences of the University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Canary Islands, Spain). BA, Geography and History, University of La Laguna (1989). MA, Ancient History, University of Salamanca (1991). PhD, History, University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (1999). Faculty member of the Research Institute of Textual Analysis and Applications (IATEXT), of the University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria.

MemberDaniel Knitter

Hi! I am a postdoc at the Physical Geography unit of Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel. Since my Master I work with prehistoric and classical archaeologists in different research projects mainly in central Europe, Greece, and Turkey. Together we investigate human-society-landscape-environment interactions. My main methodological tools are quantitative spatial analyses using models as heuristic devices. Besides landscape archeology, I am interested in (critical physical) geography, reproducible research, philosophy of science, inter-, and transdisciplinarity.

MemberTeresa Marie Hooper

I teach and study the entire Medieval and Early Renaissance periods, but I specialize in Early Medieval Literature with a focus in Anglo-Saxon England, medieval manuscripts, and just a little Late Antiquity for good measure. My areas of interest for teaching and research purposes include (but often wander outside of: Anglo-Saxon codicology; Anglo-Saxon language and literature; memory studies; LA/medieval cultural geography, cosmography, and travel narratives; LA, medieval, and Early Modern ethnography and exploration; early Latin saint’s lives; Latin texts in English translation; monsters and teratology; Chaucerian dream poems; Renaissance poetry; and Ancient to modern drama. My current research interests include the textual and codicological history of the Beowulf-Manuscript (London, BL Cotton Vitellius A.xv, part 2), the earliest Latin St. Christopher legend, and the OE and Latin versions of Orosius’ History against the Pagans. 

MemberRebecca Kennedy

I work on issues of identity formation processes in Classical Athens and, increasingly, the broader Mediterranean. My primary interests are on imperialism and issues of foreignness, geography, environmental determinism theories and the relationship between such theories and the history of race and ethnicity. I have also published on the intersections of gender, ethnicity, and citizenship in Classical Athens. I run a blog called “Classics at the Intersections” that focuses on issues of race/ethnicity and gender/sexuality in antiquity at their modern receptions. I also maintain there a database of syllabi and modules for teaching race and ethnicity in classical antiquity and a continually growing bibliography on the same subject.

MemberGersón Beltrán López

Geographer, Specialist in Geolocation, Geomarketing, Social Media  and Tourism. PhD student in Geography by the University of Valencia, Master in Regional Geographical Analysis by the University of Valencia and Master in Geographic Information Systems by the University  of  Girona. + 15 years of experience in Education and Consulting. Professor at the Department of Geography at the University of  Valencia, Manager in Geoturismo SLU and cofounder of Marketingeo

MemberJeffrey Becker

Jeffrey Becker is a Mediterranean archaeologist. Becker has held teaching positions at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, The College of William & Mary, Boston University, McMaster University, the University of Mississippi, and the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University. Additionally, Becker served as Acting Director of the Ancient World Mapping Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is an Associate Editor of the Pleiades Project and contributing editor for Etruscan and Roman art at Smarthistory.org. Becker is a veteran of archaeological fieldwork in Italy, notably on the Palatine Hill in Rome with Clementina Panella and the University of Michigan’s project at Gabii in Central Italy. He is currently a visiting assistant professor in the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Studies at Binghamton University – SUNY. At Binghamton, he teaches courses in Mediterranean archaeology and Graeco-Roman art history.