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MemberJustin Walsh

I research and teach Mediterranean art and archaeology and I am listed in the Register of Professional Archaeologists. I have worked on excavations in the United States, Spain, Jordan, and Italy (particularly at the site of Morgantina, in east-central Sicily), since 1998. In 2014, I began a new collaborative project on the Iberian indigenous settlement of Cástulo, in Andalusia, with archaeologists from the University of Jaén and the Andalusian regional government. This work has been supported by grants from the Loeb Classical Library Foundation and the National Geographic Society. I have also worked to develop the emerging field of space archaeology. Together with my co-PI, Dr. Alice Gorman (Flinders University), I am leading the first large-scale archaeological investigation of a human habitation site in space: the International Space Station. This project received a 2019 Discovery Grant from the Australian Research Council (two years at AUD$244,400). Follow @ISSarchaeology on Twitter and our website, ISS Archaeology, for regular updates on this project. My publications have concerned imported pottery found at Morgantina, and the implications of that material for a new consumer-oriented perspective on the ancient economy. The final results of this research will be published in a volume of Morgantina Studies, to be co-authored with Carla Antonaccio (Duke University) and Jenifer Neils (Case Western Reserve University). A general monograph on the relationship between economic consumption and identity in the western Mediterranean and trans-Alpine Europe, titled Consumerism in the Ancient World: Imports and Identity Construction, was published by Routledge Press in late 2013. You can read reviews here, here, here, and here. My other work includes problems related to cultural heritage management and the use of digital technology in art history and archaeology. I have received several awards, including a Fulbright Grant to Greece in 2002-2003, a Rome Prize in 2003-2004, the inaugural Arthur Ross Advanced Research Fellowship from the Institute for Classical Architecture and Classical America in 2008, and a Tytus Summer Residency Fellowship from the Burnam Classics Library at the University of Cincinnati in 2010. In 2016, I was Benjamin Meaker Visiting Professor at the Institute for Advanced Studies of the University of Bristol. USERS INTERESTED IN MY DATA SETS SHOULD VISIT THE CHAPMAN UNIVERSITY DIGITAL COMMONS.

MemberCarol Atack

From Oct 2019: Associate tutor, Director of studies in Classics, and Bye-fellow, Newnham College, University of Cambridge. Fellow (2019-20), Harvard Center for Hellenic Studies, Washington DC. Associate editor, Polis: the Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 2016-19: Post-doctoral research assistant, ‘Anachronism and Antiquity’ project, Faculty of Classics, University of Oxford, and non-stipendiary Junior Research Fellow, St Hugh’s College. Current research is focused on fourth-century BCE Greek political thought, especially temporality and change in Greek political thought and the dialogues of Plato. Teaching at Oxford included lectures and classes for Sexuality and Gender in Greece and Rome, an upper-level course for students in Classics and Ancient History at the University of Oxford. I am the treasurer of the Women’s Classical Committee UK.

MemberJohn Hobbins

The languages of the Bible have been my passion since I was 15 years old. While in high school, I was introduced to modern Hebrew by Ruth Ann Driss (now Guthmann), biblical Hebrew by Menahem Mansoor, Aramaic and Ugaritic by Keith Schoville, and New Testament Greek by John Linton, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. I went on to pursue ancient Near Eastern Studies at the University of Toronto. I studied Hebrew with E. J. Revell, J. J. M. Roberts, Stanley Walters, and John Wevers, Aramaic with E. G. Clarke, Hellenistic Greek with Al Pietersma, Syriac with D. J. Lane, Akkadian with A. K. Grayson, and Sumerian with R. F. G. Sweet. I would go back and forth to Wisconsin during my undergraduate days. I served as a research assistant for Michael V. Fox at the UW-Madison as he prepared his books on Song of Songs and Qohelet. I earned an M.A. degree at the UW-Madison and taught Elementary and Intermediate Biblical Hebrew there. My studies of Hebrew and other Northwest Semitic languages continued under Michael Fox, David McCarthy, and Ron Troxel. I studied for a year at the Pontifical Biblical Institute-Rome with Mitchell Dahood, Luis Alonso Schoekel, and many others. I earned a graduate degree at the Waldensian Theological Seminary-Rome with a dissertation under the supervision of J. Alberto Soggin on First Isaiah. Mario Liverani was the “corelatore.” The thesis was accepted for publication by Paideia editrice. I chose not to see it published at the time. I taught Hebrew at the seminary while a student there, and seminars on the Old Testament later while serving as a pastor in Sicily. I studied a year at the Kirchliche Hochschule Bethel in Bielefeld, Germany under the guidance of Frank Cruesemann and Christof Hardmeier. I am an ordained pastor in the Waldensian Church – Union of Waldensian and Methodist Churches in Italy. Currently my wife Paola serves United Methodist congregations in Wisconsin. I serve Lutheran congregations in the church body known as LCMC (Lutheran Congregations in Mission for Christ). We have three children: Giovanni, Elisabetta, and Anna. I taught Hebrew at the Waldensian Theological Seminary in Rome and the University of Wisconsin-Madison; I taught “Bible and Current Events” in the Anthropology & Religious Studies Department at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh. I am a member of editorial board of the Journal of the Evangelical Study of the Old Testament. I currently teach Hebrew in July of each year for Trinity Lutheran Seminary (Lutheran Church of the South Sudan) in Gambella, Ethiopia.

MemberNicholas S.M. Matheou

I am a social historian specialising in the Middle East and Mediterranean in the Middle Ages, particularly Anatolia, Upper Mesopotamia and Caucasia (approximately modern-day Turkey, Armenia, Georgia and Azerbaijan, as well as parts of northern Syria and Iraq). In particular my research focuses on the empire of New Rome (“Byzantium”), Armenian and Georgian polities in the central Middle Ages, and the city of Ani, between the ninth to and fourteenth centuries. I also takes a comparative perspective across the region, especially from Kurdish and Ottoman studies, as well as globally, from pre-history to the modern day. Through this research I theorise social-historical themes of hegemony and counterpower, ethnicity and nationhood, and critical political economy before, during and after the rise of capitalism. I aim towards a radical perspective on social history from an anarchist – that is, a methodologically anti-state – standpoint. I received my first degree in Ancient & Medieval History from the University of Edinburgh, before moving to the University of Oxford to complete first a master’s degree in Late Antique & Byzantine Studies, and then a doctoral dissertation in the Faculty of Oriental Studies titled ‘Situating the History attributed to Aristakes Lastiverc‘i: The Empire of New Rome & Caucasia in the Eleventh Century’. During my time as a postgraduate student I co-founded the international research network The Long History of Ethnicity & Nationhood at The Oxford Research Centre for the Humanities (TORCH), running a number of workshops, conferences and seminar series. At the IHR I will focus on developing my doctoral research into a monograph, and begin a new project titled ‘“The Fate of Unjust Cities”: Global History, Political Economy & the Abandoned City of Ani, 900-1400’. This radical global history and political economy of the abandoned city of Ani in central South Caucasia, modern-day eastern Turkey, will situate the city’s emergence, development and decline between the tenth and fourteenth centuries in macro regional and interregional transformations, particularly the Mediterranean Commercial Revolution and the emergent world-system generated by Mongol Eurasian hegemony, in connected micro analysis of developing social relations in the urban space. The project draws on Ani’s rich material remains, particularly the large corpus of monumental epigraphy, as well as numismatics, ceramics and architectural remains, supplemented by Armenian, Georgian, Greek and Islamic (Arabic & Persian) literary sources. Exploring and theorising the political economy of different state-systems, long durée histories of commercial capitalism, and subaltern resistance framed through the heuristics of hegemony and counterpower, the project touches on historical and social themes relevant across time and place.   Normal 0 false false false EN-GB KO X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:107%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:”Calibri”,sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

MemberTimothy Luckritz Marquis

Pedagogy, communication, mobility I work in faculty development and instructional design with an emphasis on online and hybrid teaching and learning and intercultural engagement. I also teach Religious Studies, Christian origins, and ancient history. My research and writing explore ancient and modern itinerancy, ancient ethnicity and modern race, gender studies, and biopolitics.