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MemberMatt Chalmers

From September 1, 2020, I am Visiting Assistant Professor in Religious Studies at Northwestern University. I specialize in questions of identity, difference, representation, and pasts shared between Jews, Christians, and Samaritans. My research and teaching uses late ancient self-fashioning as a laboratory space for the critical approaches of the scholar of religion, as well as exploring the resonance of ancient identity in scholarship and intellectual history between the past and the present.

MemberAlejandro G. Sinner

I am an Assistant Professor of Roman Art and Archaeology in the Department of Greek and Roman Studies at the University of Victoria. My research covers the social, economic and cultural history of Roman Spain, and my publications include books and articles in peer reviewed journals exploring Ibero-Roman material culture (especially ceramics and coinage), demography, Palaeohispanic languages, pre-Roman and Roman domestic and religious spaces, and the construction of identities and the processes of cultural change in ancient colonial contexts. Since 2006 I am digging at the ancient site of Ilduro (Cabrera de Mar, Catalonia) in northeastern Spain, where I am also directing a research project and leading an international archaeological field school.  

MemberPatrick McCullough

I currently serve as an Upper School History Teacher at Harvard-Westlake School in Los Angeles (US History; The World and Europe). In the classroom, I guide students as they further embrace their own analytical voices on difficult topics with confidence and clarity. I have broad teaching expertise that spans history, religion, and literature from the ancient world to the present. In my classes, I help students make creative connections between the ancient and modern; between dense theoretical materials and popular culture. In their evaluations, my students often note how much they appreciate an instructor who pushes the boundaries of their analytical abilities but also meets them where they are. I earned a Ph.D. in History of Religion, Early Christianity, at UCLA, where I also served as a regular Teaching Fellow. In my academic work, I examine representations of ideologies and identities in ancient Jewish and Christian texts and their modern interpreters. My work problematizes the modern categories we deploy in our discussions of antiquity and religion. My dissertation, “Apocalypse and Difference: Rereading Cultural Boundaries in Early Christian Texts,” explores how apocalyptic discourse in early Christian texts maintains group boundaries as their Christ-confessing authors simultaneously participate in the discursive practices of their ancient Mediterranean society and culture.