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MemberMicheal Palmer

I am the owner of Greek-Language.com, GreekLinguistics.com, and HellenisticGreek.com. You can find my blog at GreekLanguage.blog. After a career teaching Ancient Greek (both Classical and Hellenistic) and Biblical Studies, I made a radical switch in 2006 taking me much more into the field of modern language acquisition. I now teach both Spanish and English in a dual language elementary school, and I will co-direct an academic-vocabulary development program to support bi-literacy this year (2018-19).

MemberA.G. Holdier

I am a master’s student in the Philosophy department of the University of Arkansas. My current research focuses on the semantics/pragmatics divide and other issues in the philosophy of language (including contextualism, deixis, and the meaning of gestures). I am also a graduate candidate in the Office of Sustainability’s certificate program exploring the relationship between green business practices and animal ethics. Additional interests include embodiment’s implications for moral psychology, axiological grounding and its relationship to political ecology, various issues in the philosophy of religion (atheological arguments, philosophical eschatology, theological aesthetics), and Ancient Greek philosophy (specifically, Plato).

MemberChristopher Hays

Christopher Hays is the D. Wilson Moore Associate Professor of Ancient Near Eastern Studies at Fuller Theological Seminary. He has previously held teaching and research positions at Emory University, Princeton Theological Seminary, and the University of Notre Dame Tantur Ecumenical Institute in Jerusalem. He has participated in archaeological research in Israel and conducts study trips there. In 2017-18, Hays is serving as president of the Society of Biblical Literature’s Pacific Coast region. Hays is the author of Hidden Riches: A Textbook for the Comparative Study of the Old Testament and the Ancient Near East (Westminster John Knox, 2014) and Death in the Iron Age II and in First Isaiah (Forschungen zum Alten Testament 79; Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2011). He is working on the Isaiah commentary for the Old Testament Library series, having translated the book for the Common English Bible and written the entry on Isaiah for the Oxford Encyclopedia of the Books of the Bible. In 2013, he was one of ten scholars around the world to receive the Manfred Lautenschlaeger Award for Theological Promise. Hays has published articles on diverse topics in journals such as the Journal of Near Eastern Studies, the Journal of Biblical Literature, Vetus Testamentum, Biblica, Zeitschrift für die Alttestamentliche Wissenschaft, Ugarit-Forschungen, Journal of Ancient Egyptian Interconnections, and the Journal of Theological Interpretation. He has also contributed essays to various edited volumes. Hays teaches courses in Old Testament and directs the master’s program in Ancient Near Eastern Studies in the School of Theology. His languages include Hebrew, Akkadian, Ugaritic, Aramaic, Greek, and Latin. Hays is ordained in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).

MemberAdam Rasmussen

Dr. Rasmussen is a Professorial Lecturer in the Department of Theology at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. He teaches “Introduction to Biblical Literature” and “Women in Christianity,” a course of his own design that explores the significance and accomplishments of women from Eve to Thérèse of Lisieux. He is also a Senior Lecturer in the Humanities Division of Brescia University’s online program, where he teaches theology, biblical studies, and church history courses. He has a Ph.D. in Theology and Religious Studies from The Catholic University of America, specializing in historical theology and early Christianity. His research focuses on Basil of Caesarea, Origen, and the interface between theology and science in their writings. His first book, Genesis and Cosmos, was recently published in Brill’s Bible in Ancient Christianity series. His current research focuses on Basil and the human body, physiology, and medicine. He has also begun a fresh translation of Basil’s Hexaemeron. He sometimes blogs (and Tweets) about issues in the Catholic church, particularly Pope Francis and his discontents at Where Peter Is.

MemberJill Marshall

I completed the PhD in New Testament in the Graduate Division of Religion at Emory University, with specializations in Paul’s letters and women’s activity in early Christianity and ancient Mediterranean religions. This academic year (2018–19), I have research fellowships at Humboldt University in Berlin and the Albright Institute of Archaeological Research in Jerusalem to work on a project on cities in early Christianity. My book, Women Praying and Prophesying in Corinth: Gender and Inspired Speech in First Corinthians, situates Paul’s arguments about prayer and prophecy within their ancient Mediterranean cultural context, using literary and archaeological evidence. This research emerges from exegetical observations about 1 Corinthians 11-14, a section of the letter about inspired speech that begins and ends with conflicting passages about whether women should speak in the assembly. I argue that gender dynamics influence this entire part of the letter and the religious speaking practices in Corinth that prompted it. I am interested in situating early Christian texts, traditions, and communities within their cultural milieu using archaeological data. For the Summer 2016, I won the Dever Fellowship for Biblical Scholars, awarded by the American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOR). The fellowship supported one month of excavation at Shikhin, a Roman-era Jewish settlement in the Galilee, and one month of research at the Albright Institute in Jerusalem. I have also conducted research at the ancient sites of Corinth and Ephesos and participated in archaeological fieldwork at Halmyris, a Roman frontier fort on the Danube Delta. I have taught courses on Jesus and the Gospels, Luke, Acts, First Corinthians, Women and the Bible, Gender and Religion in the Ancient Mediterranean World, Global Perspectives on the Bible, Biblical Greek, New Testament interpretation, and theological writing and argumentation.

MemberMatt Chalmers

I am currently Visiting Assistant Professor of Religion at Washington and Lee University. I specialize in questions of identity, difference, representation, and pasts shared between Jews, Christians, and Samaritans. My research and teaching uses late ancient self-fashioning as a laboratory space for the critical approaches of the scholar of religion, as well as exploring the resonance of ancient identity in scholarship and intellectual history between the past and the present.

MemberGregory Lamb

Ph.D. candidate (ABD) at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary (Wake Forest, NC) in the Biblical Studies (NT) program; Advisor: L. Scott Kellum; Secondary Reader: Andreas J. Köstenberger; Outside Reader: Craig A. Evans; Adjunct Professor of Greek (SEBTS); Pastor (Mays Chapel Baptist Church [SBC] Bear Creek, NC); Solo/Lead Docent Researcher; former VP and NT Editor of Inservimus – the PhD student journal of SEBTS; Research interests include: Paul (esp. Philippians), joy and human flourishing, marriage and family, faith, work, and economics, ars vivendi/moriendi, the afterlife imagery of the NT, and the parables of Jesus (esp. Lukan parables). Seeking a full-time teaching/ministry position.