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MemberHamish Cameron

In keeping with his research and teaching interests, Hamish Cameron is an itinerant historian hailing from a far-flung colony of a former empire. Thematically, he studies movement, borderlands, networks, geography and imperialism. Geographically, he explores the Eastern Mediterranean, Southwest Asia/the Near East and Rome. Chronologically, he investigates the Hellenistic and Roman periods. Philologically, he enjoys cultural allusions and tricola. No, tetracola… Wait, I’ll come in again… Hamish received his PhD in Classics from the University of Southern California in 2014 where he wrote a dissertation examining the representation of “Mesopotamia” as a borderland in Imperial Roman geographic writing of the first four centuries CE. His monograph on the subject has now been published: Making Mesopotamia: Geography and Empire in a Romano-Iranian Borderland (Brill 2019). He received his MA from the University of Canterbury, New Zealand in 2006 with a thesis on the arrival of Roman power in Cilicia. He also holds a Graduate Certificate in Geographic Information Science and Technology (2011) from the USC Spatial Sciences Institute. He has participated in two survey seasons in Greece and in specialist conferences on digital geography, borderlands, networks, religion, and Cilicia. Hamish has taught classes in History and Classical Languages dealing with topics from the Bronze Age to the Information Age. He is interested in the applied methodologies of digital humanities, especially digital geography, the digital dissemination of academic information, and the pedagogy of tabletop games. He also designs boardgames and roleplaying games.

MemberSheila McManus

I am a Professor of History at the University of Lethbridge in southern Alberta. My research focuses on the borderlands of the North American West, and I am one of the co-editors of the H-Borderlands network. I teach the histories of the North American West, borderlands, historiography and methodology, and world history. In 2001-2002 I was the first Post-Doctoral Associate at the Howard Lamar Center for the Study of Frontiers and Borders at Yale University. I taught American and Canadian history at the University of Winnipeg in 2002-03, before joining the U of L History Department in 2003.

MemberYasmine Beale-Rivaya

My research centers on language contact, change, and borrowing in borderland communities. My main area of focus is evidence of language contact between Romance and Semitic languages among communities, especially the Mozarabic (Arabized-Christians) communities, living between the Andalusí and Christian frontier from the ninth to the early fourteenth century in Medieval Iberia. I maintain a parallel line of research where I study contact between Spanish and English, and Spanish and Indigenous Languages along borderland areas of the United States and Mexico.

MemberDuncan McDuie-Ra

Professor Development Studies UNSW. Recent books Borderland City in New India: frontier to gateway (2016: Amsterdam University Press),  Debating Race in Contemporary India (2015: Palgrave/Springer), Northeast Migrants in Delhi: race, refuge, and retail (2012, Amsterdam University Press). Associate Editor South Asia: journal of South Asian studies (Taylor and Francis), Editorial Board Asian Borderlands Book Series (Amsterdam University Press), editor in Chief ASAA South Asia Book Series (Routledge), committee Asian Borderlands Research Network.

MemberDimitris C. Papadopoulos

I am an anthropologist and a digital humanist working on built, historic, and mediated environments. My work focuses on space, place and landscape, borders and borderlands, and liminal spaces of transition, displacement, or contestation with a regional focus on Greece, Southeast Europe, and the Mediterranean. I am also interested in the dynamics between physical and digital spaces especially as shaped through mapping, data visualization and the design of information environments for learning, research, and storytelling.