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MemberKelvin Lee

Kelvin Lee holds a PhD from Durham University and is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Leuven. His research focuses on the analysis and history of nineteenth- and twentieth-century symphonic music, with special interests in the analysis of musical form, the theory of tonality, global musical modernism and the intersection between music theory, history and philosophy. Kelvin’s work has been published (or is forthcoming) in Music Analysis, Musurgia and Notes, and he is a contributor to Nikolai Medtner: Music, Aesthetics, and Contexts (Hildesheim: Georg Olms Verlag). His article ‘Rethinking the Symphonic Poem: Dialectical Form, Sequential Dissonances and the Chord of Fate in Schoenberg’s Pelleas und Melisande‘ won the Musurgia 25th Anniversary Prize from Société Française d’Analyse Musicale. He was also awarded the 2018 Theory and Analysis Graduate Student Prize from the Society for Music Analysis. Kelvin is currently writing a monograph, provisionally titled The Sonata Moment: Dialectical Form and Symphonic Modernism in Fin-de-Siècle Vienna, which examines the interrelationship between dialectical thought, chromatic tonality and sonata form.

MemberMatthew Boyle

I’m a music scholar at the University of Alabama with research interests in the analysis and history of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century opera. My current research focuses on the social and expressive use of musical schemas in Italian opera. Ongoing research projects include a series of articles on issues of pleasure and enjoyment in the operas of Gioachino Rossini, the analysis of secco recitative, musical form in early two-tempo arias, as well as music and music-making in the nineteenth-century American South.

MemberAntares Boyle

Antares (Tara) Boyle is currently Assistant Professor of Music Theory at Portland State University, and previously served on the faculty of the University of Northern Colorado. Her research focuses on contemporary art music, ranging from that by European post-serial composers Salvatore Sciarrino and Harrison Birtwistle to Canadian minimalist Ann Southam and American jazz pianist Craig Taborn. Tara completed her PhD in music theory at the University of British Columbia in 2018. Her dissertation, which theorized segmentation and form in repetitive post-tonal music, was awarded the Society for Music Theory’s SMT-40 Dissertation Fellowship in 2018, and her writing will appear in upcoming issues of Music Theory Online and Perspectives of New Music. Tara’s other research interests include theorizing musical meter, ostinato, and groove; the interactions between performance and analysis; and minimalist and process composition and improvisation. She has presented her research at various regional, national, and international conferences, including the annual meetings of the Society for Music Theory, the West Coast Conference of Music Theory and Analysis, the New England Conference of Music Theorists, the Rocky Mountain Society for Music Theory, and the Music Theory Society of the Mid-Atlantic. She serves as co-chair of the Society for Music Theory’s Post-1945 Music Analysis Interest Group and is an associate editor with the journal Analytical Approaches to World Music. Tara is also an accomplished flutist. Before turning her attention to music theory, she earned a Master’s degree in flute performance from the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, won prizes in the International Sydney Flute Festival Competition and the Gisborne International Music Competition, and spent several years working as a freelance flutist in Los Angeles. She enjoys performing new music, especially as part of a duo with her husband, pianist Rory Cowal.    

MemberÁine Heneghan

I teach Music Theory at the University of Michigan. My research focuses on the history of music theory (with an emphasis on theories of form), analysis (of tonal and post-tonal repertoires as well of world music), and sketch and source study. My current work, located at the intersection of music theory and music history, focuses on the music and writings of Arnold Schoenberg and the Second Viennese School. I recently started work on a corpus of Irish piping tunes from the 1800s, a project that combines manuscript study with digital analysis of melodic structures. In spring 2019 I was Visiting Professor at the Universität für Musik und darstellende Kunst Wien (Institut für Musikwissenschaft und Interpretationsforschung). I have served the Society for Music Theory in various capacities, most recently as Reviews Editor of Music Theory Spectrum and before that as member of the Executive Board. Currently I serve on editorial board of Music & Politics and the organizing committee for Analytical Approaches to World Music 2020 (Paris).

MemberBryan A. Whitelaw

Bryan A. Whitelaw BMus (Hons) MPhil LRSM  Bryan is a current PhD Researcher in Musicology at Queen’s University Belfast. His interests lie in the theory and analysis of 19th–century repertoire and works with allusions to literary or narrative figures, particularly in the music of Franz Liszt. Society for Musicology in Ireland Bryan is the current Student Representative and a council member of the Society for Musicology in Ireland: http://www.musicologyireland.com/ Similarly, he is a member of both the Royal Musical Association and the Society for Music Analysis. Master of Philosophy (MPhil) After completing his Bachelor of Music degree in 2015 with first-class honours, Bryan was awarded a School of Arts, English and Languages funding scholarship for his MPhil research project on the Piano Sonata in B minor (1853), by Franz Liszt. The MPhil thesis focuses on the contextual, theoretical, and hermeneutic analysis of the Liszt Sonata, and provides the first Sonata Theory analysis of this work. The thesis additionally explores a hermeneutic reading of the sonata in poetic terms, based on Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s Faust (1808), and a typological comparison with Liszt’s other Faustian works; the Mephisto Waltzes and A Faust Symphony, for example. Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) Bryan’s PhD research focuses on the interplay between Franz Liszt’s literary and cultural influences, and their impact in his compositional output during the Weimar period; ca. 1848–1861.  The research is based on the development of a narratographic music theory which attempts to bridge the divide between historically- and culturally-contextual scholarship, on the one hand, and the theoretically-rigorous application of formal theory on the other. The work thus adopts aspects of narratology, hermeneutics, and semiotics, alongside theoretical interests such as Hepokoski and Darcy’s Sonata Theory, William Caplin’s theory of formal functions, and neo-riemannian theory. The thesis explores a conextual history of Liszt’s time as kappelmeister in the Weimar Court Theatre, while situating his reception history within the lineage of Weimar Classicism. After setting up a theoretical methodology, the thesis chapters provide case-study analyses of several symphonic poems, the Faust Symphony, Dante Sonata, and the Piano Sonata in B Minor. A final chapter outlines the broader strategy Liszt employed as a compositional archetype for sonata-form works, before drawing some conclusions for the future analysis of Liszt’s oeuvre.

MemberSam Reenan

Sam Reenan is a Lecturer in music at Hamilton College and a Ph.D. candidate in music theory at the Eastman School of Music. He holds the M.A. in music theory from Eastman (2018) and the B.M. in music theory and the B.S. in biological sciences from the University of Connecticut (2014). A recipient of Eastman’s 2017–18 TA Prize for Excellence in Teaching, he has taught throughout the Eastman curriculum, most recently serving as supervisor for Sophomore Aural Musicianship. Sam is co-author of a 2016 article exploring seventh-chord voice-leading transformations, published in Music Theory Online. His dissertation focuses on issues of genre, large-scale form, and narrative in early modernist Germanic works described as “maximalist.” He has presented spoken papers on a range of topics including pitch structure in Henri Dutilleux’s Ainsi la Nuit (Music Theory Society of New York State, Ninth European Music Analysis Conference, 2017), theoretical approaches to sonata form in Mahler’s late symphonies (Society for Music Theory, 2018, 2020), T. W. Adorno’s analytical aesthetics (Music Theory Midwest, 2019), graduate instructor peer observation (Pedagogy into Practice, 2019), and commercial jingles (Society for American Music, 2020). Sam has been editorial assistant with Music Theory Online since 2016 and is a past co-editor of Intégral, where he led the journal’s transition to an online, open-access format. Outside of music theory, he enjoys sampling local coffee roasters, running, biking, rock climbing, hiking in the Adirondacks, and attending operas at the Met.

MemberSean Atkinson

Sean is currently Assistant Professor of Music Theory at the TCU School of Music where he teaches a wide range of courses, including Freshman and Sophomore music theory and aural skills, Form and Analysis, graduate seminars on music analysis and musical meaning, and a media studies class for the TCU Honors College. Prior to joining the faculty at TCU, Sean served on the music faculty at the University of Texas-Arlington. He has earned both the MM and PhD degrees in music theory from Florida State University and holds a BM in music theory and trombone performance from Furman University. While attending Florida State, Sean was nominated for the university-wide Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award. Sean’s research, which broadly address issues of musical meaning in multimedia contexts, has been published in numerous journals, including Music Theory Online, Indiana Theory Review, The Dutch Journal of Music Theory, and Popular Music. Sean is also active in the growing field of video game music (ludomusicology), with presentations at the North American Conference on Video Game Music and Music and the Moving Image. His article on Topics and Tropes in Video Game Music is published in Music Theory Online (25.2) and a chapter on the music in the game Final Fantasy IX is forthcoming in a collection that explores the work of video game composer Nobuo Uematsu (edited by Richard Anatone). Sean is also working on a monograph that explores the various ways music and media interact to create meaning. In 2018, Sean joined with a group of faculty from across campus to create No Quarters, an on-campus video game lab committed to the interdisciplinary research and teaching of video games. Housed in the TCU library, the lab allows students and teachers to explore a growing number of games and consoles, including virtual reality. At TCU, Sean is an active member of the faculty, currently serving as chair-elect of the Faculty Senate where he has been a member since 2016. As chair of the Senate’s Academic Excellence Committee, Sean helped bring a motion to the entire faculty that will add a Diversity. Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) requirement to TCU’s Core Curriculum.