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MemberEvan Jones

… with a focus on the photocopier and Xeroxlore, and the other an examination of the ‘feminisation’ of the office and its connection with office technology.

My present research interests stem from my PhD research into the perception and significance of the photocopier in 20th century visual culture. Following on from this my current research interest is in depictions and representations of the office, with a particular focus on 19th and 20th century American visual culture….

I recently completed a PhD in History of Art at the University of Nottingham. My research interests cover 20th Century American Visual Culture and Art History. I have a particular interest in dipictions of the office in 20th America.

MemberChristine Yao

Christine “Xine” Yao is a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of British Columbia in the Department of English. She works on intersections of affect, race, gender, and sexuality in relation to science and law through long 19th century American literature. Her research has been published in J19: The Journal of Nineteenth-Century Americanists and American Gothic: An Edinburgh Companion. She is an award-winning instructor of literature, culture, and writing. She completed her Ph.D.  in English at Cornell University in 2016 with minors in American Studies and Feminism, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. Dr. Yao’s postdoctoral, PhD, and MA work has been funded by competitive national grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. Her archival research has been supported by travel grants to the American Antiquarian Society, the Massachusetts Historical Society, and the College of the Library of Physicians of Philadelphia. Additional training thanks to the Center for American Visual Culture, the Futures of American Studies Institute at Dartmouth College, and the LGBT Leadership Academy at Cornell in Washington. For further information and CV, please see http://www.christineyao.com 

MemberErika Piola

Erika Piola has worked in the Print and Photograph Department at the Library Company of Philadelphia since 1997. She received her B.A. from Haverford College and her M.A. in History from the University of Pennsylvania. She is Co-Director of the Visual Culture Program and has served as a project director and curator for a number of Library Company initiatives, including Common Touch, Philadelphia on Stone, 18th-and 19th-Century Ephemera, and African Americana Graphics. She is editor and contributor to Philadelphia on Stone: Commercial Lithography in Philadelphia, 1828-1878 (Penn State University Press, 2012). Ms. Piola has also presented and published work on American visual culture, 19th-century ephemera, the antebellum Philadelphia print market, and the Library’s African American history and photography collections. Her research interests include Philadelphia lithography, the frame maker and print dealer James S. Earle, and stereographs portraying the New Woman.

MemberSierra Rooney

I am an assistant professor of art history at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, specializing in American visual culture and public art. My research interests include representations of gender and race, commemoration, civic-engagement, and place-based identity within the United States. My current book project, Breaking the Bronze Ceiling: Contemporary Statue Monuments to Women and the Changing Heroic Ideal in the United States, analyzes more than fifty monuments to the five most-commemorated women in the United States (Sacagawea, Susan B. Anthony, Harriet Tubman, Amelia Earhart and Rosa Parks) to uncover the many ways in which artists and patrons adapt the traditional model of the hero statue to integrate feminist and race-conscious modes of thought into local communities.   

MemberChristopher Lukasik

Christopher J. Lukasik is a Provost’s Fellow for Fulbright Faculty Awards and an Associate Professor of English and American Studies at Purdue University, specializing on the literary and visual cultural history of the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Atlantic world. He has received over fifteen fellowships, including long-term awards from the Rockwell Center for American Visual Studies, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Fulbright Senior Scholar Program, the American Antiquarian Society, the Boston University Humanities Foundation, the Purdue Research Foundation, and the Harrison Institute for American History, Literature, and Culture at the University of Virginia. He has presented over 90 papers on three continents and his work has been published in over a dozen journals. He is the author of Discerning Characters: The Culture of Appearance in Early America (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011) and he is currently working on a new book project entitled The Image in the Text: Intermediality, Illustration, and Nineteenth-Century American Literature.