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MemberAlison Alison

I completed my Ph.D. in English, with specializations in Medieval Literature and Digital Humanities, in June 2011.  While a student at UCLA, I worked closely with the medieval manuscripts and digital humanities initiatives at UCLA was twice the recipient of the British Library’s Internship in Illuminated Manuscripts.  After graduating, I worked as a Mellon-funded postdoctoral researcher at Saint Louis University’s Center for Digital Humanities, where I helped to develop T-PEN (Transcription for Paleographical and Editorial Notation) and Tradamus—software applications that assist scholars in transcribing manuscripts and creating digital editions.  After my postdoctoral research, I taught for a year as a Visiting Assistant Professor at the University of Puget Sound’s department of English.  I’ve published on medieval manuscripts, the digital humanities, and medieval film music. While writing her dissertation, I started an online business selling mid-century design objects to clients worldwide.  My shop has been featured in Apartment Therapy, Gourment magazine, and Etsy and has sourced products for Mad Men, Anthropologie, and Hawaii 5-0, among others. Currently, I live in Seattle and works as a Senior Curator at Amazon Books, where I curate the selection of titles for many categories in Amazon’s growing network of brick-and-mortar bookstores, including Art & Design, Graphic Novels, and Science Fiction.

MemberHelen Armstrong

Helen Armstrong views design from across the spectrum of a practicing designer, a college professor and a published author. She is an Associate Professor of Graphic Design at North Carolina State University. In addition to teaching, Armstrong works as principle of her company. Strong Design. Her clients have included Johns Hopkins, T. Rowe Price, US internetworking and Euler ACI. Her work has been recognized by Print and How Magazine and highlighted in numerous design publications. She currently serves on the editorial board of Design and Culture and as a member of the AIGA National Board of Directors and is a past co-chair of the AIGA Design Educators Community Steering Committee. Armstrong authored Graphic Design Theory: Readings from the Field (Princeton Architectural Press, 2009) and co-authored Participate: Designing with User-Generated Content (Princeton Architectural Press, 2011) with Zvezdana Stojmirovic. Her new book Digital Design Theory: Readings from the Field explores works by both designers and programmers, examining the two threads of discourse—design and computation—that have rapidly merged to define contemporary graphic design.

MemberSarah Werner

Sarah Werner is an independent librarian, book historian, and digital media scholar based in Washington, DC. Her latest project, Studying Early Printed Books, 1450-1800: A Practical Guide, was published by Wiley Blackwell in the spring of 2019; the book is accompanied by EarlyPrintedBooks.com, an open-access website showcasing images of hand-press books and pedagogical resources. Werner worked for nearly a decade at the Folger Shakespeare Library as the Undergraduate Program Director and as Digital Media Strategist; in those roles she taught a regular semester-length research seminar on book history, created their research blog (The Collation), and led the overhaul of their website. She has a PhD in English from the University of Pennsylvania and is the author of numerous works on Shakespeare and performance, including Shakespeare and Feminist Performance (Routledge 2001), as well as on bibliography, digital tools, and pedagogy.

MemberJuan Moises de la Serna

Recognized by the International Biographical Center (Cambridge – UK) as one of the top one hundred health professionals in the world in 2010. He also teaches in various national and international universities   Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/l/B017WVN8US Twitter: https://twitter.com/PsychologyBook2 Facebook: https://bit.ly/2EUa5Kz Blog: https://juanmoisesdelaserna.es/en/ ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8401-8018 Loop: https://loop.frontiersin.org/people/107568 Email: popularscientist@juanmoisesdelaserna.es

MemberRamzi Salti

Ramzi Salti, Ph.D. Lecturer of Arabic, Author & Radio Host Stanford University Stanford, CA 94305-2006 ___ My Stanford Faculty Page: https://profiles.stanford.edu/ramzi-salti My Arabology Blog: http://www.arabology.org Arabology on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/arabology My Arabology Podcasts: https://soundcloud.com/arabology Author Page: https://www.amazon.com/author/ramzisalti LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/ramzisalti Stanford DLCL Page: https://dlcl.stanford.edu/people/ramzi-salti

MemberEleanor Sandry

My research is focused on developing an ethical and pragmatic recognition of, and respect for, otherness and difference in communication. I write about communication theory and practice, and draw upon varied examples—taken from science and technology, science fiction and creative art—to illustrate the ideas in my work. Much of my work to date has explored the communicative possibilities illustrated by human interactions with humanoid and non-humanoid robots, looking to fact and fiction, science and art, for inspiration. This research has now been published (along with some more recent thinking about human interactions with explosive ordnance disposal robots and robotic floor cleaners) as a book, Robots and Communication, with Palgrave Macmillan in the Pivot series.

MemberKatherine D. Harris

Katherine D. Harris, a Professor in the Department of English and Comparative LiteratureSan José State University, specializes in Romantic-Era and 19th-century British literature, women’s authorship, the literary annual, 19th-century history print culture and history of the book, textuality, editorial theory, Digital Humanities, and Digital Pedagogy. Her work ranges from pedagogical articles on using digital tools in the classroom to traditional scholarship on a “popular” literary form in 19th-century England. She chronicled her teaching adventures in the March 2011 blog, A Day in the Life of Digital Humanities, along with 200 other participants which turned into a plenary address for the 2012 Re: Humanities and an article about the successes and failures of teaching with digital tools, “TechnoRomanticism: Creating Digital Editions in an Undergraduate Classroom” (Journal of Victorian Culture April 2011). Because of this work, Harris was named to the Council on Digital Humanities for the National Institute of Technology in Liberal Education and  co-taught a week-long seminar in Digital Pedagogy at the Digital Humanities Summer Institute, University of Victoria. In January 2012, she represented Digital Pedagogy as a panelist at the DHCommons pre-conference workshop, “Getting Started in Digital Humanities,” at the 2012 Modern Language Association ConventionHarris wrote about her pedagogical adventures over at FairMatter.com, a blog hosted by W.W. Norton Publishers. Her most recent article on digital pedagogy was published in Fall 2013 for Polymath. The latest experiment, along with co-editors Rebecca Frost Davis, Matthew K. Gold, and Jentery Sayers, involves open peer review, GitHub, and establishing a digital pedagogy collection of teaching materials, Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities along with the Modern Language Association. In keeping with her work in Digital Humanities, Harris chaired the California Open Educational Resources Council, a state-funded initiative to promote adoption of open educational resources textbooks in the University of California, California State University, and California Community College segments (113 campuses). After 3 years of state-funded work, that initiative has been converted to a program supporting adoption of OER materials on individual campuses throughout the CCC and CSU (AB 798 [Bonilla 2015]). The Council’s work culminated in a series of helpful OER resources:

Council members, including Harris, continue to submit journal articles to publicize their findings — the latest published article by Hanley & Bonilla presents initial findings based on surveys, focus groups, and a pilot project conducted on CCC, CSU, and UC faculty and students as well as the infrastructure of the CA-OER Council. In her scholarly adventures, Harris’ research on 19th-century British literary annuals resulted in a literary history of annuals: Forget Me Not: The Rise of the British Literary Annual (1823-1835) (Ohio UP, 2015), a monograph based on her articles, “Feminizing the Textual Body: Women and their Literary Annuals in Nineteenth-Century Britain” (Publications of the Bibliographical Society of America 99:4) and “Borrowing, Altering and Perfecting the Literary Annual Form – or What It is Not: Emblems, Almanacs, Pocket-books, Albums, Scrapbooks and Gifts Books” (Poetess Archive Journal 1:1). She created a legacy scholarly edition for the study of literary annuals, The Forget Me Not: A Hypertextual Archive, most of which has been re-coded into TEI and incorporated into the Poetess Archive Database edited by Professor Laura Mandell. Harris’ edited collection of Gothic short stories from the 1820s’ most popular annuals, with Zittaw Press (2012) was part of her plenary address at the Gothic Fiction Studies Conference in March 2012. Two talks that were offered during Spring 2014 at universities in New Zealand addressed some of the more interesting findings about the publishers, printers, and engravers in the business of literary annuals. In January 2013, she returned to her textual studies foundation with her presentation, “Echoes at Our Peril: Small Feminist Archives in Big Digital Humanities” at the 2013 Modern Language Convention in Boston, a talk originally given in October 2012, Scripps College as part of their Humanities Institute lecture series. In February 2013, Harris spoke at the Mellon-funded Digital Humanities Colloquium, Austin College. In Spring 2014, she returned to the road with  a talk focusing on the work of David C. Greetham at The Graduate Center, City University of New York being published in Textual Cultures 9.1 (2015). In Fall 2014, the travel continued with an invited talk on collaboration at the University of Alabama’s Digital Humanities Center and another on “archive” at the University of Tulsa, and then an appearance at the Modern Language Association Convention 2016 in Austin to co-preside over a digital pedagogy poster session. As of Fall 2019, her promotion to Full Professor and ensuing sabbatical have offered an opportunity to dig deeply into the intellectual representations of British Romanticism to continue to investigate moving beyond the Big 6 of this literary period. Her current project combines her work on SJSU’s “Deep Humanities” endeavors to conjoin Humanities and STEM curriculum on campus as well as continuing the commitment to publish in open access journals. She has spent the last few years on community-building through the Humanities, especially with her talk to the both the Book Club of California and the San Jose Museum of Art. To see her most recent and upcoming talks as well as the accompanying slides, check this page. For a full list of courses, syllabi, assignments, calendar, office hours, contact information, see Harris’ teaching page.