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MemberClaus Janew

Our striving for knowledge is a declaration of love. By gaining wisdom we are loved in return. – Claus Janew lives in Dresden and Bonn, Germany, and is an independent philosopher and autodidact who has been alternating between multi-year full-time research and multi-year full-time employment for funding since 1985. He only writes when he has something new to say. Claus Janew discovered the infinitesimality structure, an explanation of both consciousness and reality being a direct solution to the problem of free will. Part of it is an unlimited change of conscious focus in principle. The basics have been published in German and English journals. A comprehensive book about his metaphysics is available in German; furthermore a self-help guide and a challenging dialogue, the latter in English as well.

MemberErin Laura O'Neil

I’m a master’s candidate in Digital Humanities at the University of Alberta, specializing in Gender & Social Justice Studies. I’m also the Wikipedian in Residence at the U of A Library for 2020. My undergraduate degree (2008) is from the Arts & Science Program at McMaster University and I have a master’s degree (2016) in Philanthropy and Nonprofit Leadership from Carleton University. My current research interests revolve around investigating the online structures and networks that facilitate, encourage, or even necessitate ignorance and apathy, specifically with respect to white women and anti-racist work. Social networks and general online navigation are increasingly driven by algorithms which use our past behaviour to reveal a virtual world that reflects our own values and opinions; unless we seek it out, we are unlikely to encounter alternative viewpoints. I am curious to explore how we can work against this isolating aspect of digital worlds and foster positive, productive knowledge exchange online.

MemberPaul Reilly

Currently, Visiting Senior Research Fellow in the Archaeological Computing Research Group at the University of Southampton, where I focus on two main areas of research: ontological transformations of archaeology in the digital, especially due to the developing alignments between virtual and physical words; exploring the significance of craft skills in field archaeology, which involves extensive cross-disciplinary collaboration with fine artists.I am a pioneer of data visualisation and virtual heritage. My involvement in archaeological computing began in 1982 while working on my PhD in which I developed and applied proto-GIS technology to the analysis of the archaeological landscape of the Isle of Man. My fascination with the potential and pitfalls of digital technologies to model, explore, present, translate, transform and re-present archaeological data and interpretation has expanded ever since. Now my peer-reviewed research output investigates the implications of additive manufacturing and their affordances for contemporary archaeology (see ORCID account: orcid.org/0000-0002-8067-8991).I am a past chairman and now life member of CAA (Computer Applications in Archaeology), Chairman of the CAA International Scientific Committee, a member of Virtual Heritage Network Ireland, CAA-Greece and the editorial board of Virtual Archaeology (virtualarchaeology.ru)In addition to my academic credentials I bring more than 23 years of wide international business experience in the IT and communications sector (with IBM) where I was worldwide leader for Knowledge brokering, professional and community development and complex solution deployment for the Telecommunications Industry business unit. I have also held leadership roles for strategy development, marketing, sales and research and development (where I was the industry leadership team interface to IBM Research Division). Previous to IBM I was a research fellow and free-lance field archaeologist working in UK, Germany, Austria, and Spain and pioneer of data visualisation techniques in archaeology.

MemberAlejandro L. Madrid

Alejandro L. Madrid is author or editor of books and edited volumes about the intersection of modernity, tradition, globalization, and ethnic identity in popular and art music, dance, and expressive culture of Mexico, the US-Mexico border, and the circum-Caribbean. Working at the intersection of musicology, ethnomusicology, and performance studies, Madrid’s work interrogates neoliberalism, globalization, and postmodernism while exploring questions of transnationalism, diaspora, and migration; homophobia and constructions of masculinity; embodied culture; and historiography, narrative, biography theory, and alternative ways of knowledge production in music and sound practices from the long twentieth century. In 2017, he was awarded the Dent Medal for “outstanding contributions to musicology” by the Royal Musical Association and the International Musicological Society. He is the only Ibero-American to have received this award since its inception in 1961. He is also the recipient of top prizes from the Latin American Studies Association, the American Musicological Society, the ASCAP Foundation Deems Taylor/Virgil Thomson Awards, the International Association for the Study of Popular Music-US Branch, and Casa de las Américas, among others, as well as fellowships and grants from the American Council of Learned Societies, the Ford Foundation, and the Fulbright Program. Madrid is currently professor of musicology and ethnomusicology at Cornell University’s Department of Music. He is the editor of the series Currents in Iberian and Latin American Music for Oxford University Press, and is regularly invited as guest professor at universities in Argentina, Chile, Cuba, Mexico, and Uruguay. Most recently, he served as music advisor to acclaimed director Peter Greenaway, whose latest film, Eisenstein in Guanajuato, is set in 1930s Mexico.