Search

MemberKirsty Millican

I completed my PhD from the University of Glasgow titled ‘Contextualising the Cropmark Record: The timber monuments of Neolithic Scotland’ in 2009. From 2009-10 I held a short-term lectureship at the University of of Aberdeen and from 2010 have worked for Historic Environment Scotland. I am currently Aerial Survey Projects Manager at Historic Environment Scotland and Affiliate Researcher (Archaeology) at the University of Glasgow. I am co-director of the Lochbrow Landscape Project, an archaeological survey project investigating the sites and landscapes at and around Lochbrow in Dumfries and Galloway. My research interests include the Neolithic and Early Bronze Age of Scotland, timber monumentality and the use of wood to build monuments, aerial archaeology and the interpretation of cropmarks, relationships between humans and the environment in prehistory, landscape archaeology and the integration of experiential and GIS approaches. My publications cover themes of Neolithic Scotland, cropmark archaeology, experiential and landscape archaeology.

MemberMike Bishop

Field archaeologist and artefact specialist, experienced in post-excavation management and aerial/satellite image interpretation. Also a practising copy-editor, proofreader, indexer, and typesetter, as well as a published writer and volume editor, book illustrator, and translator. Founding editor of the Journal of Roman Military Equipment Studies. I am a specialist on the Roman army and Roman artefact studies with long-term interests in the archaeological applications of computing and all aspects of publishing in archaeology.

MemberKaty Whitaker

My doctoral research is an investigation of the archaeology and history of sarsen stone use in southern Britain. Funded by the South, West, and Wales Doctoral Training Partnership, I am co-supervised by Professor Martin Bell (University of Reading) and Professor Josh Pollard (University of Southampton). My study area extends from Dorset to Kent, and expect my specific case studies to be in south-west Dorset, north Wiltshire, the Oxfordshire/Berkshire border, south Buckinghamshire, and the Medway Valley in Kent. A heritage professional for a number of year, I work for Historic England, the UK public body that helps people care for, enjoy, and celebrate England’s historic environment. With strengths in archaeological archives, aerial photography, and historic mapping, my current role is in heritage protection.

MemberJames Green

I have been a working archaeologist for almost 30 years in the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic United States. I am experienced with all aspects of terrestrial archaeological survey, site testing, site mitigation, artifact analysis, curation, data management, historic and archival research, and report writing. I have supervised hundreds of Phase I site delineations and have crewed or supervised numerous Phase II and III prehistoric and historic site investigations. I have taught prehistoric lithic and ceramic analysis, as well as historic artifact analysis to up to 8 individuals at the corporate level. I have given knapping and prehistoric pottery making demonstrations, as well as reproducing prehistoric vessels for museums and corporate culture. I am a GIS professional who uses aerial imagery and LiDAR to analyze the terrain on a regular basis. Additionally, I have spent almost 20 years processing and analyzing offshore geophysical data.

MemberFrancesco Iacono

I joined the Department of History, Culture and Civilization of the University of Bologna after winning the “Montalcini” program against the so-called “brain-drain” and after a long period of research at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research at the University of Cambridge (first with a fellowship from the Institute for Aegean Prehistory and then with a Marie Slodowska Curie IF). Previously, I had earned a Ph.D. at the Institute of Archeology, University College London, funded by the AHRC and the British School at Athens. My research interests range from prehistory and archeology of the Mediterranean (with particular attention to the Bronze Age), to social theory (in particular Marxist archeology) to the use of applications based on graph-theory, to cultural heritage studies (with specific attention to the so-called “difficult heritage”), and, finally, the history of the archaeological thought.

MemberEmma Dwyer

I develop research projects and studentships with collaborative partners in Higher Education and the wider archaeology sector for MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology), the only archaeology unit that is a UKRI Independent Research Organisation. I was previously Business Development Executive (Heritage) at the University of Leicester, developing collaborative research, consultancy, CPD (Continuing Professional Development) and contract research projects between organisations in the heritage sector and academic staff in the Schools of Archaeology & Ancient History, History, Arts, and Museum Studies. These knowledge exchange activities ensure that teaching and research into heritage and the historic environment continues to inform, and be informed by, professional practice. I undertook my PhD at Leicester’s Centre for Historical Archaeology, in the School of Archaeology & Ancient History, where I contributed to undergraduate and postgraduate teaching in Historical Archaeology. Before coming to Leicester I was Senior Archaeologist in the Built Heritage department at MOLA and previously worked for archaeology units across Britain. I am a full Member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists (MCIfA), Associate Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (AFHEA) and Hon. Secretary of the Society for Post-Medieval Archaeology.