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MemberMatteo Pangallo

Dr. Pangallo is a former Junior Fellow in the Society of Fellows at Harvard University and currently assistant professor of English at Virginia Commonwealth University. His primary areas of interest are early modern drama and theater history, with a focus upon connections between text, performance, and reception. He also has an interest in dramatic literature generally and the social and intellectual history of the book. His research focuses upon the complex connections between plays and the playhouses from which they emerged – their performance practices, modes of authorship and textual transmission, audiences and experiences of reception, and place within their historical context. As a scholar and a teacher, he is interested especially in the edges of theatrical and literary history, both how those edges transform our understanding of the center and how they can serve as entirely new centers themselves. Dr. Pangallo’s first book, Playwriting Playgoers in Shakespeare’s Theater (2017, University of Pennsylvania Press), focuses upon theatrical audiences and amateur playwriting in early modern England. Currently he is working on two books. “Theatrical Failure in Early Modern England” explores the causes and productive results of aesthetic, commercial, and material failure in domains such as the professional stage, court masque, household entertainment, and university play. “Strange Company: Foreign Performers in Medieval and Early Modern England” surveys the history of performers who toured to England from Spain, Italy, France, Ireland, Scotland, the Ottoman Empire, and elsewhere, establishing the role that they played in the development of early English theatrical culture and situating England’s theatrical Renaissance as one part of a global and more complexly transnational, transcultural theatrical Renaissance. Dr. Pangallo has designed and taught courses in early modern literature, dramatic literature, theater history, and book history at Bates College, Mount Holyoke College, Westfield State University, the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and Salem State University. He has been the recipient of grants from the Bibliographical Society of the United Kingdom, The Malone Society, and the Shakespeare Association of America, as well as a Jack Kent Cooke Foundation Scholarship and Jacob K. Javits Fellowship. Outside of his academic pursuits, Dr. Pangallo is a director and dramaturge and has worked for Salem Theatre Company as its founding artistic director, Rebel Shakespeare Company, and the Globe Theatre in London. He is also an award-winning book-collector.

MemberJennifer E. Nicholson

I recently submitted my PhD in the Department of English at the University of Sydney, Australia. My research projects currently span Shakespeare studies (particularly Hamlet), Montaigne, Shakespeare in translation, Renaissance books, Renaissance publication history, and world literature. I have also worked on Anglophone translations of Japanese film and my broader research interests include untranslatability and comparative translation.

MemberSarah Werner

Sarah Werner is a book historian, Shakespearean, and digital media scholar based in Washington, DC. Her latest project, Studying Early Printed Books, 1450-1800: A Practical Guide, will be published by Wiley Blackwell in the spring of 2018; the book will be accompanied by a website showcasing images of hand-press books and pedagogical resources. Werner worked for nearly a decade at the Folger Shakespeare Library as the Undergraduate Program Director and as Digital Media Strategist; in those roles she taught a regular semester-length research seminar on book history, created their research blog (The Collation), and led the overhaul of their website. She has a PhD in English from the University of Pennsylvania and is the author of numerous works on Shakespeare and performance, including Shakespeare and Feminist Performance (Routledge 2001), as well as on bibliography, digital tools, and pedagogy.

MemberTodd Barnes

Todd Landon Barnes is Associate Professor of Literature at Ramapo College of New Jersey. His essays and reviews have appeared in Shakespeare Bulletin, Public Books, Renaissance Quarterly (forthcoming), Weyward Macbeth: Intersections of Race and Performance, Shakespearean Echoes, Hamlet Handbook: Subject Matter, Adaptations, Interpretations, and Julius Caesar: A Critical Reader, part of the Arden Shakespeare’s Early Modern Drama Guides series. Barnes has served as dramaturg for the African-American Shakespeare Company in San Francisco, where he also worked in educational outreach. He is currently completing a monograph on Shakespeare, performance, and neoliberalism. He serves on the editorial board for Cambridge University Press’s forthcoming Elements: Shakespeare Performance series.

MemberHugh M. Richmond

I head the U.C.B. Shakespeare Program which develops audio-visual/digital materials for the teaching of Shakespeare such as the video documentaries “Shakespeare and the Globe” (distributed by Films for the Humanities),and “Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre Restored” and “Shakespeare and the Spanish Connection” (both distributed by TMW Media). In addition to the above-cited web site, “Shakespeare’s Staging,” we have also developed Milton material, such as the documentary “Milton by Himself” (Films for the Humanities) and a website: http://miltonrevealed.berkeley.edu