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MemberBrittany Roberts

Brittany Roberts is a Ph.D. candidate in Comparative Literature at University of California, Riverside, where she studies 20th- and 21st-century Russian and Anglophone literature and cinema. She is currently writing her dissertation, which undertakes a comparative analysis of Russian and Anglophone horror literature and cinema focusing on depictions of humans, animals, the environment, and the ecological and metaphysical dynamics that link them. Brittany has published articles and chapters in The Irish Journal of Gothic and Horror Studies and the forthcoming collections Ecohorror, Plants in Science Fiction: Speculative Vegetation, and The Spaces and Places of Horror. She is especially interested in how horror disrupts the human-nonhuman binary and in how speculative fiction reconsiders, challenges, and reconceives of our relations with other species.

MemberAma Bemma Adwetewa-Badu

My research focuses on politics, aesthetics, and identity construction and representation as articulated through avant-garde poetics and 20th/21st century Anglophone Black diasporic literature and culture, especially poetry. I am especially interested in the intersection of politics and aesthetics in literature, and the ways in which avant-garde poetics disrupt preconceived notions of Blackness  (and personhood) while constructing an open nature to the signs placed upon the (black) body. My most recent project, “Iterations of Identity: Black Diasporic Poetics and the Politics of Form,” positions these interests in a comparative aesthetic perspective, with a focus on examining avant-garde poetics through a primary lens of close-reading and aesthetics, including a study of the politics of aesthetics as dictated by neo-colonialism in West-Africa and the Caribbean, and racialized climates constructed by the global white gaze.

MemberNicole Rizzuto

Statement of Interest as Candidate for MLA’s Executive Committee LLC 20th and 21st Century English and Anglophone Literatures My interest in serving on the Executive Committee for Twentieth and Twenty-First Century English and Anglophone Literatures stems from my ongoing research within these fields and from my commitment to addressing the changing structure of the profession and its effects on knowledge production and scholarly activity. I take the current ideological and financial pressures placed on the humanities and literary studies occurring in the context of ecological and employment crises as challenges to be met on a number of fronts. I will work toward fomenting an inclusive atmosphere in the organization of sessions, panels, and other scholarly activities to encourage dialogue among all ranks of teacher-scholars across racial, gender, ethnic, sexual, and class identifications. I am interested in supporting a range of scholarship that foregrounds methodological debates about interpretative practices and ways of reading colonial, postcolonial, and neocolonial modernities; scholarship that reflects on the protocols of disciplinary and cross-disciplinary formations in era of an increasingly globalized and digitalized literary studies; and scholarship that considers how these debates, practices, and protocols are shaped by precarities emergent with the contraction of employment opportunities and resources for those working in the fields of twentieth and twenty-first century literatures. I will work to encourage the participation of graduate students, Early Career Researchers, and independent scholars in reimagining the intellectual landscape of the field and its professional practices. Finally, given the unevenly experienced effects of the climate crisis, I will support environmental humanities work that foregrounds marginalized perspectives while reconfiguring the boundaries of humanistic thought through engagement with social sciences, natural sciences, and science and technology research.

MemberRachel S. Harris

Rachel S. Harris is Associate Professor of Israeli Literature and Culture in Comparative and World Literature and the Program in Jewish Culture and Society at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Her recent publications include An Ideological Death: Suicide in Israeli Literature (2014) and Warriors, Witches, WhoresWomen in Israeli Cinema (2017). She is the book review editor for the Journal of Jewish Identities, and Chair of the Women’s Caucus of the AJS (Association for Jewish Studies) 2018-2020.