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MemberFelipe Martinez-Pinzon

19th Century Latin American Literature, Latin American Studies, Latin American Literature (Literature), 19th Century Colombian History, Colombia, Maps and Society, Historical Geography, Tropical Ecology, Eco-criticism, War Theory, Naturaleza/cultura, Nature Culture, Costumbrismo Latinoamericano, 19th century culture and politics – Colombia & Latin America, 19th Century Latin American Art History, Modernismo, Spanish and Latin American Modernism, Spanish American Independence, Society and Politics 19th Century Latin America, Amazonia, Costumbrismo hispánico, and Historia política y social siglos XIX y XX

Membernispero

I am a scholar of U.S. and Latin American literature and culture of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In particular, my first book and my current projects reflect a transnational approach to the cultural history of capitalism. They address a common broad question: how are our local and national identities shaped by and through popular economic and political narratives? My book, A Cultural History of Underdevelopment: Latin America in the U.S. Imagination (University of Virginia Press, 2016) explores how Americans have mapped the hemisphere from the mid-19th century to the end of the Cold War in terms of an economic geography in which the United States was a rich nation among poor ones. The most common term for this geography and condition of poverty has been “underdevelopment,” a term from the social sciences that has also drawn on cultural generalizations about the origins and the spaces of poverty. Since I arrived at Wayne State, I have also taught and writen about the history and culture of Detroit, especially in the ways its image circulates outside the city–as the Motor City, Motown, the Arsenal of Democracy, and the city of ruins. My new project, Keywords for the Age of Austerity, is an evolving online work of historical etymology and cultural criticism. I trace the history of economic concepts in the mass media, uncovering the history and common use of popular terms like “accountability,” “entrepreneur,” and “innovation.”

MemberMarlene Daut

Marlene L. Daut has a B.A. in English and French from Loyola Marymount University, and she earned a Ph.D. in English from the University of Notre Dame in 2009. She is currently Associate professor of African Diaspora Studies in the Carter G. Woodson Institute and the Program in American Studies at the University of Virginia. Before joining the faculty of UVA, Daut was Associate professor of English and Cultural Studies at Claremont Graduate University. She has also been the recipient of fellowships from the National Humanities Center, the Ford Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). She is the author of two books: Baron de Vastey and the Origins of Black Atlantic Humanism (Palgrave, 2017) and Tropics of Haiti: Race and the Literary History of the Haitian Revolution in the Atlantic World, 1789-1865 (Liverpool, 2015); and the forthcoming edited collection, An Anthology of Haitian Revolutionary Fictions. Her articles have appeared in numerous scholarly journals such as, Studies in Romanticism, L’esprit creatur, Small Axe, Nineteenth-Century Literature, Comparative Literature, South Atlantic Review, Research in African Literatures, and J19. She is also co-editor and co-creator of H-Net’s scholarly network, H-Haiti.